5th Cavalry DUI & COA

5th Cavalry Regiment

Distinctive Unit Insignia and Coat of Arms

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 7/32 inches (3.10 cm) in height consisting of a coat of arms blazoned as follows: Shield: Or a cross moline Sable, on a chief embattled of the last a Maltese cross Argent.

Crest

On a wreath of the colors (Or and Sable) a bundle of five arrows Sable armed and flighted Gules, tied with a rattlesnake skin having five rattles Proper; the device enclosed within a motto scroll arcing over the top of the shield and inscribed “Loyalty” on the dexter side and “Courage” to sinister in Black letters.

Symbolism

The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The cross moline symbolizes the charged of this Regiment on Longstreet’s troops at Gaines Mills in 1862; a charge which saved the Union artillery and which is characterized by the Regimental historian as “its most distinguished service.” The cross moline is supposed to represent the iron pieces of a mill stone (moulin, the French word Mill). The chief is for the Puerto Rican Expedition of 1898. The original name of the island was San Juan, named for the old knights of St. John who wore a white maltese cross on a black habit. The partition line is embattled to suggest the castle on the Spanish arms. The crest is for the Indian campaigns of the Regiment; the number of arrows corresponds to the numerical designation of the organization.

Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 5th Cavalry on 19 January 1923. It was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) on 16 December 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry on 10 July 1959. It was amended to revise the symbolism on 23 June 1960.

Coat of Arms

Blazon

Shield: Or a cross moline Sable, on a chief embattled of the last a maltese cross Argent.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Sable) a bundle of five arrows Sable armed and flitted Gules, tied with a rattlesnake skin having five rattles Proper.

Motto: LOYALTY AND COURAGE.

Symbolism

Shield: The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The cross moline symbolizes the charge of this Regiment on Longstreet’s troops at Gaines Mills in 1862; a charge which saved the Union artillery and which is characterized by the Regimental historian as “its most distinguished service.” The cross moline is supposed to represent the iron pieces of a mill stone (moulin, the French word Mill). The chief is for the Puerto Rican Expedition of 1898. The original name of the island was San Juan, named for the old knights of St. John who wore a white maltese cross on a black habit. The partition line is embattled to suggest the castle on the Spanish arms.

Crest: The crest is for the Indian campaigns of the Regiment; the number of arrows corresponds to the numerical designation of the organization.

Background: The coat of arms was originally approved for the 5th Cavalry on 11 June 1921. It was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) on 16 December 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry on 10 July 1959. It was amended to revise the symbolism on 23 June 1960.

Highlights - CTA

Ghosts of Fallujah

Ghosts of Fallujah (written by Coley D. Tyler) is a first person account of the Second Battalion, Seventh Cavalry’s participation in the Second Battle of Fallujah, the largest single engagement of the Iraq War and the largest urban battle since Hue in 1968. A First Marine Division operation, it was spearheaded by one of the […]

Special Annoucements

Taps Update – 12 March 2019

12 March 2019 Added SGT Charles G. Buttram who died 2 February 2019, CPT Raymond D. Kinnard who died 25 December 2018, LTC (Ret) Louis R. Lefebvre who died 24 February 2019, 1LT Frederick I. Levine who died 11 December 2018, SSG Dennis C. London who died 26 February 2019, 1LT Bruce R. Markusen who […]