DSC World War II Citations

1st Cavalry Division Distinguished Service Cross

World War II Citations

WWII Division Parade Brisbane 1943

Troopers of the 1st Cavalry Division have been awarded 261 Distinguished Service Crosses in four wars, with 113 of them being awarded posthumously.  There were no Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to First Team Troopers during the Gulf War or from service in Afghanistan.

Citations

ARMSTRONG, PETER J.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Peter J. Armstrong, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy on 19 March 1944. Corporal Armstrong’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 83 (1944)

 Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Just beyond the regimental outpost line, stiff fire was met from several enemy bunkers. During the fire fight preceding the assault on the pillboxes, Corporal Peter J. Armstrong of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Corporal Armando V. Valencia of Tucson, Arizona both of “D” Troop, 8th Cavalry set their machine gun in position at a range of 35 feet from one of the bunkers in the teeth of its fire. Armstrong commenced a continuous burst of fire on the bunker thereby disclosing his position and although he was hit and wounded by snipers’ bullets, he sustained the fire until a grenade knocked him unconscious. Although the gun had been holed by Japanese bullets and was leaking water from its jacket in several places, Valencia unhesitatingly took it over and continued fire at the bunker slits until the gun froze, whereupon he continued the fire with his submachine gun enabling a squad to finish off the obstacle with grenades.”


CHASE, WILLIAM C.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William C. Chase, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 2 and 3 February 1945. Brigadier General Chase’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 87 (1945)

CONNER, HASKETT L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Haskett L. Conner, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel (Cavalry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces at Manila, Philippine Islands, on 3 February 1945. Colonel Conner commanded a Cavalry Squadron spearheading a motorized advance from Guimba to Manila. After leading his forces across one hundred miles of enemy territory in three days, he arrived at Manila just before dusk. Dispatching one troop to seize Malacanan Palace, he beat off a vigorous counter-attack from the direction of Far Eastern University, which counter-attack threatened to block the advance south on Quezon Boulevard. He then turned to direct his remaining forces in the assault on the internment camp at Santo Tomas University. Under heavy and continuous enemy fire, he was wounded as he led his men to the gates of the prison. Nevertheless, he continued to direct the attack and before the Japanese guards had time to harm the internees, the university had been seized. Through his heroic leadership in the face of grave danger, Colonel Conner contributed to the liberation of over three thousand allied internees and the annihilation of many enemy troops.  Lieutenant Colonel Conner’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 131 (1945)

DAVIDSON, SHIRLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Shirley Davidson, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces from 12 to 24 February 1945. Second Lieutenant Davidson’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army. On 12 February, Lieutenant Davidson’s platoon was attacking a group of strongly fortified enemy pillboxes on the edge of the town of Malabon which with unobstructed vision were pouring forth the most intense fire upon those in the assault. Ordering his platoon to seek cover, Lieutenant Davidson moved alone through about two hundred yards of machine gun and mortar fire and obtained counter artillery fire from the forward elements of an adjacent unit which neutralized the enemy positions. Thereupon Lieutenant Davidson moved his platoon against fierce enemy resistance so skillfully that several enemy strongpoints were demolished without casualty to his men. Three days later he led his platoon through three thousand yards of fish ponds and open terrain between Malabon and Little Tokyo. Upon approaching a group of four buildings, in the nearest of which the enemy was located, he deployed his squad and moved forward alone, throwing grenades. Followed by two riflemen, he secured the house, killing the four enemy inside. Twenty more were wiped out before the patrol mission was completed, though none of Lieutenant Davidson’s men were wounded. The following week, during the assault on Intramurous, his platoon was temporarily halted by fierce enemy machine gun fire after capturing two city blocks. Lieutenant Davidson obtained a tank and, although exposed to continuous Japanese rifle and mortar fire for five hours, so maneuvered the tank that a road barricade and two well-fortified machine gun positions were knocked out. Thereafter, Lieutenant Davidson led his platoon through continual sniper fire to completion of their mission. The next morning his platoon with one other secured the remaining city blocks and west wall, the battalion objective. Lieutenant Davidson immediately volunteered to establish contact with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division situated some five hundred yards to the west of the Walled City and advise them of the capture of the west wall. To do this, it was necessary to cross an open park exposed to enemy fire and the possibility of fire from friendly troops while approaching their forward elements. He made the contact successfully and killed a sniper during his return trip. By his heroic actions Lieutenant Davidson proved an inspiration to his men upon every occasion and his outstanding bravery greatly contributed to the successful operations of his platoon and battalion. The outstanding heroism and skill displayed by First Lieutenant Davidson on these occasions reflect highest credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 49 (1945)

DEITRICK, HAROLD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold W. Deitrick, Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 25 February 1945. During the last stages of the battle for Manila, a group of probably sixty enemy Soldiers, armed with machine guns, mortars, and small arms, made a fanatical stand in a concrete building in the Intramuros District. Sergeant Deitrick, a Section Chief of an Infantry Cannon Company, led a group of howitzers to bring fire to bear on this strong point. Driving a self-propelled howitzer through heavily mined streets, he took a position exposed to direct enemy fire and supervised the delivery of eighty-six rounds into the enemy fortress. During this time, the machine gun mounted on his vehicle was destroyed by enemy fire. Shortly afterward enemy mortar fire struck the vehicle, seriously stunned two crew members and shocked the others. Sergeant Deitrick gave first aid to the casualties and continued single-handed to place effective fire on the enemy. Relieved by another howitzer, he was turning the vehicle to leave when it struck a hidden mine. Although it was damaged and the crew badly shaken again, he succeeded in returning to the ammunition dump. Reloading with more ammunition, he returned through the mined streets to the firing position. Exposed to enemy fire, deprived of maneuverability, and with several of his crew missing, he continued to fire the howitzer against the enemy strong point until it was captured by foot troops. Through his outstanding heroism and determination in the face of grave and certain danger, Sergeant Deitrick released other vehicles for fire missions and materially aided in the successful elimination of the last enemy bastion in Intramuros. His intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 49 (1945)

*FINNEY, HAROLD L. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold L. Finney (18006722), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, in action against enemy forces near Kamansi, Leyte, Philippine Islands, on 22 November 1944. When a cavalry patrol encountered strong enemy resistance in rugged terrain, Sergeant Finney, a squad leader, was ordered to move his men, reinforced by light machine guns, to the right flank of the main body of troops in order to deliver enfilade fire on the enemy. While proceeding to the new position the squad was forced to cross open terrain. Here they were pinned to the ground by a heavy concentration of fire. Realizing the extreme danger of remaining in this position, Sergeant Finney ordered his men to deploy, while he remained to cover their withdrawal. This maneuver enabled his troops to reach cover safely and thereafter to complete their mission, but the efforts of Sergeant Finney in their behalf drew intense fire in which he was killed. Through outstanding heroism in giving his life for his men, he made possible the advance of his patrol. Sergeant Finney’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 131 (1945)
Home Town: Dallas, Texas

GALLAGHER, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Gallagher, Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 3 February 1945. while serving with G Troop, 2d Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces at Manila, Philippine Islands, on 3 February 1945. Sergeant Gallagher was a squad leader in a Cavalry rifle Troop which, together with the service elements of the Cavalry column entering Manila, became engaged after dark with strong enemy forces barricaded in concrete buildings on both sides of a wide street. For over three hours the troop was subjected to heavy fire from rifles, machine guns, grenades, dynamite charges. When ammunition began to run short, Sergeant Gallagher left the troop position in a sandbagged building and twice ran across the fire swept street, lighted by flames from blazing vehicles and a burning ammunition dump, to procure ammunition from trucks in the street. Later, damaging fire was being received from a sandbagged bunker in the center of the street. Sergeant Gallagher rushed the position, entered it and killed the enemy machine-gun crew inside with his sub-machine gun. When all troop officers and the First Sergeant became casualties, Sergeant Gallagher assumed command of the troop and led it, repelling three heavy enemy counterattacks. His individual heroism and gallant leadership were an inspiration to the men of his troop and a vital factor in the eventual success of the engagement. His intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 12 (1945)

GERHART, JAMES C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James C. Gerhart, Major, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces at Manila, Philippine Islands, on 3 February 1945. As Executive Officer of a Cavalry Squadron driving from Guimba to Manila, Major Gerhart accompanied the point of the column through fifteen miles of heavily occupied and strongly defended enemy-held territory. In the face of repeated attacks he pressed the advance through sheer determination. When he arrived at the Santo Tomas Internment Camp in Manila, the enemy opened fire with machine guns, mortars and rifles, and laid an intense barrage over all routes of approach. Without hesitation Major Gerhart scaled the wall of the camp, unfastened the gate from the inside, and enabled his troops to enter the compound. Leading the advance through the yard, he engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat and killed many in the struggle which ensued. Although the entire area was swept by machine guns, rifles and grenades, he continued the advance until his forces has surrounded and occupied the building. Major Gerhart’s outstanding heroism and gallant leadership were vital factors in the liberation of 3,500 civilian internees without loss of life and with few casualties to our own troops.  Major Gerhart’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 131 (1945)

HENSHAW, MARVIN J. (MIA-KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Marvin J. Henshaw (1031248), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces on 29 February 1944. Second Lieutenant Henshaw’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 19 (1944)
Home Town: Dickinson County, Texas

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Six hours after the initial assault wave hit Momote Beach, General MacArthur went ashore from  his flagship, the U.S.S. Phoenix, and with General Chase inspected the perimeter established by our Troopers.  The commander-in-chief made an on-the-spot award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Lieutenant Marvin J. Henshaw of Haskell, Texas (“G” Troop), the first American to land on Los Negros in the operation.  Two weeks later Lieutenant Henshaw lost his life when a boat he was in swamped and sank off the coast of Los Negros.  He was a good swimmer himself and survivors reported that when last seen he was attempting to tow several non-swimmers ashore.”

JORDAN, GROVER S.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Grover S. Jordan, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces on 20 March 1944. Corporal Jordan’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 64 (1944)
Home Town: Bassett, Nebraska

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“A platoon of “C” Troop, 12th Cavalry, reconnoitering south of Lombrum Point on 20 March was caught by enemy machine gun and sniper fire as it reached a small clearing in this area.  When the platoon was ordered to withdraw and cover the evacuation of the wounded, Corporal Grover S. Jordan, of Rose, Nebraska, volunteered to stay and protect the platoon leader and three other wounded men.  He placed himself between them and the enemy and then saved their lives by repulsing three successive Japanese attacks.”

*LEWIS, CALVIN T. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Calvin T. Lewis (35736737), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment, in action against enemy forces on 9 March 1945, at Luzon, Philippine Islands. Private First Class Lewis’ intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 43 (1945)
Home Town: Glasgow, Kentucky

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“PFC Calvin T. Lewis of Glasgow, Kentucky, a member of “B” Troop, 7th Cavalry, was posthumously awarded a Distinguished Service Cross for the extraordinary heroism he displayed in putting a Japanese bunker out of commission.  When the platoon in which he was a BAR-man was stopped dead by machine gun and rifle fire from the camouflaged bunker, he unhesitatingly volunteered to locate the position and knock it out.  After carefully searching the terrain to the front, Lewis found the bunker and, with complete disregard for his own safety, crawled to a point on the flank of the bunker and opened automatic fire.  After placing heavy fire through the gun slits on the side of the emplacement, he moved boldly to a position in front of it.  The enemy spotted him and fired at him, but he sprayed the main opening with his BAR.  In the exchange of fire, Lewis was mortally wounded, but he remained in his position engaging the enemy until all occupants of the bunker were killed.  His extreme bravery in the face of grave and certain danger was an inspiration to his comrades and in the highest traditions of the military service.”

LOBIT, WILLIAM E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William E. Lobit, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 4 March 1944. Lieutenant Colonel Lobit’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 49 (1944)

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“The leader of these gallant Soldiers of the “Fighting Fifth” which had successfully seized and held their objective against overwhelming odds since the beginning of the campaign was Lieutenant Colonel William E. Lobit of Galveston, Texas.  He commanded the assault force in the initial landing on enemy-held territory of the Admiralty Island group on 29 February.  During the ensuing four days of raging battle, when the chance of success teetered precariously in a fragile balance, his forcefulness, aggressiveness, cool courage and determination enabled him to lead his troops to victory and won him a Distinguished Service Cross.”

LOPEZ, MARGARITO G.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Margarito G. Lopez, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 20 December 1944. Private First Class Lopez’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 48 (1945)

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Back in the Leyte River Valley where the 2nd Squadron, 7th Cavalry, was protecting communication lines and searching out by-passed enemy positions, a member of “E” Troop, PFC Margarito G. Lopez of San Antonio, Texas performed heroic acts that gained him a reputation of being a one-man army and won him a Distinguished Service Cross.  When a twelve-man patrol approached a well concealed enemy emplacement, the BAR-man was struck in the chest by a burst of machine gun fire, and seriously wounded.  Lopez, unhesitatingly and with disregard for the danger involved, crawled to the side of the wounded man and succeeded in dragging him to a place of safety.  He then took the man’s BAR and ammunition belt and launched an individual assault on the machine gun position, pouring a steady stream of fire into it as he moved in.  In this quick, aggressive, and courageous action, Lopez killed thirteen of the enemy and captured the machine gun.  His extraordinary fighting skill and bravery so inspired the patrol that it went forward to annihilate the remainder of the hostile position.  A total of forty dead Japanese were counted on the position at the cost of one wounded American.”

*LOTT, MALCOLM E. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Malcolm E. Lott (38052471), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces near Caibaan, Leyte, Philippine Islands, on 20 October 1944. Private Lott was a member of a reconnoitering patrol which was making its way through deep swamps and rice paddies toward Caibaan, seeking to discover routes for a regimental advance. He and the patrol sergeant, who were ahead of the main body, encountered an enemy force and immediately opened fire. During this engagement Private Lott was seriously wounded in the jaw, but courageously remained in combat rather than seek cover or medical aid or wait for help. He continued to fire into the enemy with his automatic rifle until fatally wounded, and by the time the rest of the patrol was in a position to give assistance, he and the sergeant had killed nine of the enemy and forced the remainder to disperse. Through his outstanding heroism in the face of grave danger as the cost of his life, Private Lott enabled the patrol to complete its mission successfully, and his courageous conduct was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States, reflecting great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 131 (1945)

*MATTISON, RANDOLPH F.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Randolph F. Mattison, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 3 February 1945. Sergeant Mattison’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 110 (1945)

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Sergeant Randolph F. Mattison of Corning, New York and the anti-tank platoon of the 8th Cavalry had his 37mm gun rammed by the leading vehicle of a Japanese convoy when defective ammunition prevented his gun from firing.  He was awarded the DSC because he crawled to a nearby jeep which mounted a machine gun and delivered point blank fire from and exposed position.”

McADOO, WINFRED E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Winfred E. McAdoo, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 10 December 1944. Staff Sergeant McAdoo’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 94 (1945)

NICHOLS, JOHN L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John L. Nichols, First Lieutenant (Cavalry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces on 19 and 20 February 1945. First Lieutenant Nichols’ intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 51 (1945)

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“During the attack on the High Commissioner’s Residence, Lieutenant John L. Nichols of Spur, Texas took command of B Troop (1-12 Cavalry) when the CO was wounded.  Enemy bullets pinned the troops to the ground, but Lieutenant Nichols got up and went through the fusillade to select a new position.  He gave directions to the supporting tanks, and when darkness had settled, he resupplied his troops with ammunition, evacuated the wounded, and assembled his men in the new area he had selected.  At dawn he led a surprise attack on the building which netted 36 Japs killed, 5 machine guns and a twin-20mm gun captured or destroyed.  As if that were not enough, he then led a successful attack on two nearby buildings which resulted in all enemy occupants being killed.  Nichols was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his inspiring leadership and extraordinary heroism.”

*PALMER, NELSON D. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Nelson D. Palmer (13117090), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, in action against enemy forces on 3 April 1945. Private Palmer’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 56 (1945)
Home Town: Hampden County, Massachusetts

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“A Distinguished Service Cross was won during this period by PVT Nelson D. Palmer of Springfield, Massachusetts.  Palmer was in command of a guerrilla force assigned the mission of destroying an isolated enemy position in the vicinity of Lipa.  When unexpected enemy fire filled his men with panic, Palmer dashed to the front and rallied his wavering command.  His personal example and words of encouragement saved the day.  At the height of the attack with success in sight, Palmer was killed but his heroic performance with long be remembered.  He was a member of “G” Troop, 8th Cavalry.”

TESTA, LOUIS
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis Testa, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment, in action against enemy forces on 29 March 1945. Private First Class Testa’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 74 (1945)
Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“PFC Louis Testa of St. Paul, Minnesota fired his rifle at the advancing enemy until he had expended all of his ammunition.  Then he took some hand grenades and rushed forward under fire.  He threw hand grenades into a defiladed enemy position along a railroad embankment.  After returning to his troop’s perimeter for more grenades he advanced to within 15 feet of a Japanese mortar position where his accurate grenade-throwing put the weapon out of operation by killing or driving off the crew.  Testa made three additional forays delivering the grenades to the place where they would do the most good and thereby made a major contribution toward repelling the enemy attack.”

TUCK, JOSEPH Q.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Q. Tuck, Captain (Cavalry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, while serving with the 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces on 1 March 1944. Captain Tuck’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 69 (1944)
Home Town: Winterville, Georgia

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Captain Tuck, Communications Officer, of the 1st Cavalry Brigade Headquarters, had been caught by fire from an enemy bunker while he was laying wire for the command post communications.  While thus engaged he had observed a wounded photographer in front of the pill-box and it was while dragging the wounded man to safety that he was severely wounded.  After being hit, Captain Tuck caught a grenade thrown by the enemy and tossed it back into the pill-box greatly assisting in the eventual destruction of the Japanese position.”

URENDA, MANUEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Manuel Urenda, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment, in action near Malvar, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on 29 March 1945. Due to a shortage of men, Corporal Urenda, a first gunner in a mortar squad, was acting as a light machine gunner in the perimeter of Troop D, 7th Cavalry, when he perceived an enemy attack and shouted a warning to his comrades. Simultaneously he opened fire and inflicted heavy casualties on the advancing Japanese. Knocked to the ground by mortar fire which tore two holes in his helmet, he immediately regained his position and resumed firing. When his assistant was wounded, and he ceased firing long enough to administer first aid, the enemy partially surrounded his position. As he again commenced firing, he was shot in the neck by a sniper. Recovering and resuming fire he was wounded twice more by rifle bullets. He crawled back to his position and, fighting extreme pain, continued to fire with devastating effect on the enemy. Refusing to be evacuated, he stayed at his gun until directly ordered to leave. When the enemy assault was repulsed, a large quantity of munitions, twelve Japanese dead and evidence of numerous other casualties were found in front of his position. Corporal Urenda’s heroic devotion to duty in spite of his painful wounds was an important factor  in turning back the enemy attack. Corporal Urenda’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 74 (1945)

VALENCIA, ARMANDO V.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Armando V. Valencia, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, in action against enemy forces on 19 March 1944. Corporal Valencia’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Far East, General Orders No. 49 (1944)

Information from 1st Cavalry Division World War II:
“Just beyond the regimental outpost line, stiff fire was met from several enemy bunkers.  During the fire fight preceding the assault on the pillboxes, Corporal Peter J. Armstrong of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Corporal Armando V. Valencia of Tucson, Arizona both of “D” Troop, 8th Cavalry set their machine gun in position at a range of 35 feet from one of the bunkers in the teeth of its fire.  Armstrong commenced a continuous burst of fire on the bunker thereby disclosing his position and although he was hit and wounded by snipers’ bullets, he sustained the fire until a grenade knocked him unconscious.  Although the gun had been holed by Japanese bullets and was leaking water from its jacket in several places, Valencia unhesitatingly took it over and continued fire at the bunker slits until the gun froze, whereupon he continued the fire with his submachine gun enabling a squad to finish off the obstacle with grenades.”

ZALUSKY, LOUIS
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis Zalusky, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company G, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action against enemy forces on 12 March 1945. Sergeant Zalusky’s intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces-Pacific, General Orders No. 89 (1945)

*Awarded Posthumously

Distinguished Service Cross

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces). It is awarded for extraordinary heroism:

While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States;
While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy and Marine Corps, and Coast Guard when operating under the authority of the Department of the Navy) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force).

Highlights - CTA

Special Annoucements