DSC Vietnam War Citations

1st Cavalry Division Distinguished Service Cross

Vietnam War

Troopers of the 1st Cavalry Division have been awarded 261 Distinguished Service Crosses in four wars, with 113 of them being awarded posthumously.  There were no Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to First Team Troopers during the Gulf War or from service in Afghanistan.

Citations

*BAHL, WALTER TIMOTHY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Timothy Bahl (RA16918048), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 December 1968 as a medic on a reconnaissance-in-force mission northeast of Quan Loi. His company made contact with an estimated battalion-size North Vietnamese Army force located in well concealed positions and armed with automatic and semi-automatic weapons, rockets and mortars. Specialist Bahl immediately went to the aid of his comrades and, after evacuating all of the injured members of his element to a medical evacuation site, rushed to the platoon which was engaged in treating and carrying them to the evacuation point, the waist-high grass in which several of the casualties lay was ignited by the constant enemy barrage. Working feverishly, he rescued the men and then used his shirt to beat out the fire before he was forced back by the spreading flames, suffering burns and near exhaustion. Hearing a cry for a medic, he again risked the weathering hostile fire to reach the stricken Soldier. He was painfully wounded by an enemy grenade as he started to render medical aid, but fearlessly began to pull the man to safety. Although wounded a second time, he still continued his attempt to remove his comrade until he was struck a third time by the hostile fusillade and was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Bahl’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1140 (April 2, 1969)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

BIERI, LEON D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leon D. Bieri (0-75501), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Major Bieri distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as Battalion Operations Officer during the relief of a small unit engaged with two entrenched Viet Cong battalions near Bong Song. Learning that two company commanders had become casualties, Major Bieri volunteered to be flown into the beleaguered companies to lead them through the assault. On reaching a company pinned down by intense fire, he fearlessly stood up in the fire swept area and led his men straight into the hostile positions to their front. His sudden attack startled the insurgents and forced them to drop back to a secondary perimeter. Again his men were stopped by devastating fire. Moving to his right to lead a platoon in another flanking maneuver, Major Bieri encountered three insurgents who had penetrated his perimeter. Armed with only a pistol, he killed all three, but suffered a serious shoulder wound. Spotting another sniper behind the lines, he also killed this man before he could fire a shot at the friendly Soldiers. When Major Bieri succeeded in leading a squad in a flanking attack on the Viet Cong, the insurgents feared being surrounded and tried to break by running right through his small element. Although losing blood and completely exposed to hostile fire, he directed aerial attacks until the frantic enemy withdrew. Major Bieri then supervised evacuation of the wounded until he passed out for loss of blood. Major Bieri’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2352 (May 25, 1967)

BOUCHARD, THOMAS D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas D. Bouchard (RA11482630), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Bouchard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967 while serving as a rifleman during combat operations near the village of Dai Dong. Upon hearing that his former company was involved in a fierce firefight with a battalion of North Vietnamese. Private Bouchard left the security of the headquarters area where he was assigned as a cook, boarded a helicopter and flew to the battle site. He joined the unit as it began an assault on heavily fortified enemy positions. In the first minutes of the attack, one of the company’s armored personnel carriers was hit and the entire crew was wounded. Private Bouchard fearlessly raced twenty meters through an intense hail of bullets to the stricken vehicle. Still exposed to withering enemy fire, he placed all casualties in the area aboard the armored personnel carrier, mounted the vehicle, and took the controls. He then drove the vehicle to safety, plowing through the North Vietnamese machine gun bunker and killing its occupants as he went. A second assault was unleashed, and Private Bouchard braved savage hostile fire to personally charge several fortified enemy bunkers and destroy them with rifle fire and hand grenades. While assaulting one of the emplacements, he came face to face with three North Vietnamese and killed them at point blank range with bursts from his weapon. His dauntless courage in close combat accounted for twenty enemy dead and inspired his fellow Soldiers to achieve and overwhelming victory. Private First Class Bouchard’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 954 (March 1, 1968)

BRANHAM, STEVEN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Steven R. Branham, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Branham distinguished himself while serving as a machine gunner during a reconnaissance mission in Binh Long Province. His unit was moving over thick, jungle terrain when the forward element was pinned down by rocket and automatic weapons fire from an attacking enemy squad. Without hesitation, Specialist Branham rushed forward from his position in the rear of the element to engage the attackers with machine gun fire. Unleashing bursts of fire as he crawled along, Specialist Branham made his way over an exposed trail as the enemy’s automatic weapons and rocket fire filled the air and impacted all about him. When his assistant was felled by hostile fire, he shielded his comrade with his own body until a medical aidman could move up. Despite an increased volume of enemy fire, Specialist Branham then gathered up his machine gun and ammunition and resumed his lone assault on the enemy. With the adversary’s fire following his every movement, he boldly dashed to a position and with devastatingly accurate machine gun fire drove the foe to hasty and disorganized retreat. Specialist Four Branham’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1081 (May 6, 1970)

*BRENNER, KENNETH JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Kenneth James Brenner (US56432124), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Brenner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 as a medic in Tay Ninh Province. While his Company was securing a perimeter to allow helicopters to deliver supplies, the unit came under intense fire from a nearby wood line. Exposed to a hail of bullets, Private Brenner advanced over a hundred meters to reach several wounded comrades who lay close to the enemy bunkers. Firing his rifle at the communists, he treated the casualties and aided in their evacuation. When all the injured had been rescued and his company withdrew, he went to the rear where he continued to administer medical treatment and helped load ambulance helicopters. After air strikes were directed against the foe, he joined his unit in a second assault. As he courageously tried to help a man caught in the hostile killing zone, he was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade. Private First Class Brenner’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2138 (June 17, 1969)
Home Town: Hope, Kansas

*BURNS, DARRELL EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Darrell Edward Burns (535-52-7607), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Burns distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 June 1970 while a member of a rifle company deployed against hostile forces in the Kingdom of Cambodia. On that date Sergeant Burns’ squad was deployed in a company-size perimeter when it began to receive small arms and rocket fire from an unknown-size enemy force. After the initial contact subsided, Sergeant Burns detected movement to the front. Disregarding his personal safety, he moved outside the perimeter in order to gain a satisfactory position from which to use fragmentation grenades on the suspected enemy. Sergeant Burns threw a grenade in the direction of the hostiles and the grenade hit a tree and bounced back toward the company perimeter. Realizing that the grenade would explode close to his comrades and the number of friendly casualties that could result, Sergeant Burns unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his safety, lunged in the direction of the grenade as other personnel scrambled for cover. Sergeant Burns sacrificed his life as he threw himself in the direction of the grenade and absorbed the total and lethal fragmentation effects of the grenade as it exploded. Sergeant Burns’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 32 (August 3, 1972)
Home Town: Everett, Washington

BURROW, GEORGE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George D. Burrow (0-84961), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major Burrow distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1967 while serving as pilot of an armed helicopter supporting an infantry battalion’s ground operations near Tra Kieu. Although his craft had been damaged in an earlier mission, he immediately responded to a request to assist the unit. He began screening the terrain to the front of the battalion’s advance, and soon detected a large enemy force. Without hesitation, he engaged the enemy with repeated low-level, low-speed rocket and machine gun strafing runs. Despite intense, concentrated fire directed at his ship, he continued to pound North Vietnamese Army positions until it was necessary for him to refuel his ship and re-supply it with ammunition. After re-supplying his helicopter, he returned to the battlefield and quickly detected several hostile troop concentrations in separate locations to the infantry’s front. Braving a withering ground fire, he repeatedly attacked the enemy positions, killing numerous North Vietnamese Soldiers and clearing the force’s path of advance. As the operation continued, Major Burrow discovered an enemy squad deploying for an ambush and attacked it. He placed devastating rocket and machine gun fire on the ambush site and killed all the enemy Soldiers with deadly fire. As he was about to depart the battlefield to rearm his aircraft, he saw an automatic weapons emplacement to the front of the infantry. He quickly landed behind the friendly force, secured ammunition for his guns, and returned to engage the hostile position. Again facing ravaging fire, he demolished the enemy emplacement with a heavy barrage. Throughout the day, he repeatedly risked his life to engage the numerically superior North Vietnamese Army forces in combat and accounted for forty-one hostile Soldiers killed in action. Major Burrow’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 930 (February 29, 1968)
Home Town: Converse, Texas

*BYRD, GUY ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Guy Albert Byrd (RA14615832), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Byrd distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 April 1967 while leading his unit in a search and destroy mission near Song Mao. As soon as Sergeant Byrd’s Company was infiltrated by helicopter, it received intense hostile fire and was unable to advance against the strongly fortified North Vietnamese positions. After the landing of a reinforcing platoon and an aerial bombardment of the enemy positions, his company began to advance on line, meeting stubborn resistance from insurgent machine gunners. Sergeant Byrd led his platoon in an aggressive assault against the numerically superior North Vietnamese force, but his men were again pinned down by intense hostile fire. At this point, Sergeant crawled to within 20 meters of a fortified position that was protecting an enemy machine gun. When he was close enough to the emplacement, he pulled the pin on a hand grenade and raised up to throw it. He was immediately hit in the chest by machine gun fire. Sergeant Byrd was unable to throw the grenade, but realized that it explosion could kill several comrades near him. Sacrificing his own life to save his fellow Soldiers, he fell on top of the grenade and absorbed the force of the explosion. Platoon Sergeant Byrd’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2792 (June 10, 1967)
Home Town: Enterprise, Alabama

CAMPBELL, DARRELL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Darrell W. Campbell (US54718639), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Campbell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 February 1968 as a medic at a forward operations base in Quang Tri Province. The base came under intense fire from a North Vietnamese Army unit employing small arms, grenades, rockets and satchel charges. In the initial minutes of the attack several men were wounded. Hearing their cries for help, Specialist Campbell rushed from his foxhole to administer medical aid. As he was moving an injured Soldier to a protected area, he was wounded in both legs and the face by an exploding charge. Partially blinded and in intense pain from his wounds, Specialist Campbell nevertheless continued to treat his comrades. He went from position to position through the fierce barrage, dragging the more seriously injured to cover in the center of the camp’s perimeter. Only after all other casualties had been evacuated, did he allow himself to be removed from the battle area. Specialist Four Campbell’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4321 (September 11, 1968)

*CANAVAN, MARTIN JOSEPH, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Martin Joseph Canavan, Jr. (US56707321), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Canavan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 while leading a platoon involved in a mission in enemy dominated terrain in Tay Ninh Province. Having just made a combat assault into the area, Sergeant Canavan’s company set up a defensive perimeter prior to constructing a landing zone. As the first supply helicopters approached the site, the enemy opened fire on the company with small arms, automatic weapons and rockets. After the initial barrage, Sergeant Canavan was placed in charge of the third platoon with instructions to assist the first and second platoons, who had received the brunt of the attack. He effectively emplaced his men to lay down protective fire under which the two threatened platoons could withdraw to safety. He then personally led a squad to remove the injured men in the killing zone. When increased bombardment forced his squad to pull back, he called in air strikes and artillery to silence the enemy. After organizing and leading an assault on the wood line, where the foe lay entrenched, he seized the opportunity offered by the advance to evacuate the wounded and dead who were stranded after the first attack. When the bodies had been removed and the wounded given emergency treatment, Sergeant Canavan pulled his troops back to avoid further casualties. In a last minute effort to reach another wounded comrade pinned down in the open by enemy fire Sergeant Canavan was struck down by intense enemy fire. Staff Sergeant Canavan’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2028 (June 9, 1969)
Home Town: Barstow, California

CARMICHAEL, PATRICK S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick S. Carmichael (RA18964156), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 227th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter), 11th Aviation Group, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Carmichael distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the night of 11 March 1969 at Quan Loi while serving as a perimeter guard. An enemy Soldier infiltrated through two rows of defensive wire and threw a hand grenade at the bunker where Specialist Carmichael was on duty. Reacting instantly, he yelled a warning to his two fellow guards, who were resting, and pushed them to safety. He then grabbed a bundle of empty sand bags and dove toward the grenade in an attempt to smother the explosion. Just as he reached the grenade, it detonated. Specialist Carmichael was wounded seriously but his comrades escaped injury. Specialist Four Carmichael’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1751 (May 15, 1969)

*CARROLL, ROBERT HUGH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Hugh Carroll (0-94175), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Carroll distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1968 as an infantry company commander during a search and destroy mission in the vicinity of Lai An, Quang Tri Province. His reconnaissance platoon came under heavy attack by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army element. Captain Carroll immediately organized a relief force and led it across a thousand meters of open terrain completely exposed to enemy gunners and artillery. Reaching his beleaguered troops, he found that both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant were casualties and quickly re- established order and confidence. With complete disregard for his safety, Captain Carroll maneuvered from man to man through a barrage of North Vietnamese artillery and mortars to inform each Soldier of his rapidly devised withdrawal plan. The enemy launched a ground attack before his troops could break contact, but it was successfully repulsed. Captain Carroll then signaled to start the withdrawal and exposed himself to a renewed hostile bombardment to direct his men’s movement. As he moved among them he was mortally wounded by an exploding enemy mortar round. Captain Carroll ‘s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5214 (November 8, 1968)
Home Town: Missoula, Montana

*CHERVONY, EDDIE EDWIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eddie Edwin Chervony (US56694812), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 1st Battalion, 77th Field Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Chervony distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 May 1968 at Landing Zone Peanuts, west of Khe Sanh. Late at night he detected the start of an attack against his battery position by an estimated North Vietnamese’s Army sapper battalion. He immediately organized his three-man bunker, which was on the portion of the perimeter facing the brunt of the attack, and directed his companions’ fire into the assaulting troops. His element’s ammunition was soon expended and close fighting developed along the perimeter. Sergeant Chervony led his men across and expanse of unprotected exposed terrain to secure an unmanned machine gun. After directing his men to obtain additional ammunition for the weapon, he began placing withering fire into the aggressors. After exhausting his ammunition for the weapon, he took charge of personnel in adjacent positions and directed their deadly fire into the enemy, blunting the attack. Learning that several positions had been overrun, Sergeant Chervony unselfishly exposed himself to the continuing hostile fusillade to assist in rescuing the casualties in them. On separate trips, he evacuated five seriously wounded across one hundred meters of open terrain to a place of safety. When carrying a sixth man to the friendly lines he was cut off by enemy force and was attacked with grenades and satchel charges. While protecting his wounded companion from the satchel charge by covering him with his own body, he received a mortal wound. Sergeant Chervony’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5164 (November 6, 1968)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

CLAYTON, JERRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry D. Clayton (US56826809), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Clayton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 March 1968 while serving as a rifleman during a search and destroy operation near Hue. His unit came under intense enemy fire which caused several casualties. As medics maneuvered towards two of the wounded, Private Clayton placed fire on hostile positions and stood up to draw the communists’ fire upon himself and away from the aidmen. When medics reached the injured Soldiers, he joined them in their completely exposed area to provide suppressive covering fire for them as they worked to save their patients. Later, five men including two medics were wounded and pinned down by the fusillade. Exposing himself to the heavy machine gun fire, Private Clayton secured a supply of battle dressings and maneuvered to them to treat their wounds. After dragging a seriously wounded medical officer seventy-five meters to a place of relative safety, he returned through the bullet-swept area to aid another man who was bleeding profusely. He tended his comrade’s wounds and then returned to the medical officer to further treat his extensive injuries. Private Clayton next called in mortar and aerial rocket artillery support on the enemy as he shielded his patient from continuing fire. With the help of another man he then dragged the officer seventy-five meters to an evacuation point. Private First Class Clayton’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5217 (November 10, 1968)

CLEMMONS, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William A. Clemmons, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army (Retired), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Master Sergeant Clemmons, Retired (then Captain, United States Army) distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Xuan Loc, Vietnam, on 14 June 1971, while serving as Commander of Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Company D, while on a reconnaissance mission east of Xuan Loc, encountered an undetermined superior size force which opened fire with 40-mm. rockets, automatic weapons fire, claymores, and 60-mm. mortars. During the initial contact he front platoon suffered immediate heavy casualties. Sergeant Clemmons maneuvered the two uncommitted platoons to provide supporting fire on both flanks where the casualties were located, while directing gunship and artillery fire to suppress the enemy’s fire superiority. While the flank platoons provided supporting fire, Sergeant Clemmons advanced to the enemy’s killing zone to bring back his wounded men. He pulled one man back and carried him to a safe location. Upon his return, he was wounded in the chest by AK-47 fire. Bleeding severely and crawling, he reentered the killing zone and brought back two other wounded men. His men, inspired by his action, increased the tempo of aggressiveness and their fire while maneuvering and closing in on the enemy. Sergeant Clemmons, in pain and bleeding profusely, crawled a third time into the killing zone and retrieved a fourth wounded man. Rejoining the closing and flanking platoons, Sergeant Clemmons directed air and artillery fire on the bunker complex occupied by the larger enemy force and continued to direct the platoons closing in on the enemy, forcing them to withdraw and abandon their fortified bunkers which saved the lives of several of his seriously wounded men still caught in the enemy’s killing zone. Master Sergeant Clemmons’ extraordinary heroism, exemplary leadership, and interest in the welfare of his men were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (1984)

*COBB, HUBBARD DON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Hubbard Don Cobb (RA18533582), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Cobb distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 January 1968 while leading his platoon in an attack near Dai Luong. A scout helicopter, performing a reconnaissance at Sergeant Cobb’s request, made contact with elements of a Viet Cong regiment in a rock and cave complex in which the platoon was operating. Sergeant Cobb deployed his troops for an assault and immediately received sporadic but deadly rifle and grenade fire. The initial burst wounded the two point men. Sergeant Cobb quickly directed counter fire which accounted for two enemy dead. He then placed himself on the point as the platoon maneuvered around a series of openings in the rocks. Sergeant Cobb spent the next hour creeping forward to hurl explosive charges into the caves. Disregarding his safety, he repeatedly engaged the enemy, personally killing three Viet Cong. At dusk, as he was approaching a cave, an enemy Soldier suddenly appeared and, with a burst of automatic rifle fire, mortally wounded Sergeant Cobb. Although he was dying, Sergeant Cobb assaulted the position carrying an explosive charge and plunged headfirst into the hole, killing his foe in the resulting blast. Platoon Sergeant Cobb’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3264 (July 10, 1968)
Born: October 21, 1940 at Athens, Texas
Home Town: Odessa, Texas

*COLLIER, NOAH CHANDLER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Noah Chandler Collier, Jr. (RA14933490), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Collier distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1966 while serving with elements of the 8th Cavalry on a search and destroy mission along the Song An Loa River. After his squad had flushed out several Viet Cong from tunnels along the river bank, Private Collier and two other men escorted the prisoners back to the platoon. Returning to continue the search, he heard a burst of hostile machine gun fire which severely wounded his squad leader, knocking him under the swift current. Undaunted, Private Collier swam twenty meters through a barrage of bullets to where the Soldier had fallen. Disregarding his safety, he then discarded his weapon and fearlessly dove under water in an attempt to save his stricken comrade. Surfacing amid devastating enemy fire splattering the water around him, Private Collier shouted that he could not find the wounded man. As he started to diver under the water again he was fatally wounded by Viet Cong machine gun fire. Demonstrating boundless courage and selfless concern for the welfare of the others, he sacrificed his own life in a valiant effort to save a fellow Soldier. Private First Class Collier’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1177 (March 17, 1967)
Home Town: Wiley, Georgia

COMER, BILLY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy R. Comer, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Comer distinguished himself while serving as a senior medical aidman during combat operations in Cambodia on 22 June 1970. On this date, Specialist Comer’s company was engaged by a large, well concealed enemy force firing small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket grenade launchers. Observing a wounded comrade lying in a forward, exposed position, Specialist Comer left his defensive position and ran through the enemy fire to the casualty. While enemy bullets struck all around him, the specialist calmly treated the Soldier’s wounds and carried him to a covered position within the allied perimeter. Later, during an emergency helicopter re-supply operation, the specialist again moved forward through the intense hostile fire to rescue a Soldier seriously injured during the operation. When an evacuation helicopter finally arrived on the scene to rescue the wounded Soldiers, Specialist Comer secured one of the casualties to a litter to be hoisted to the hovering helicopter. However, the intense enemy fire directed at his exposed position snapped the cable attached to the litter causing the casualty to fall approximately ten feet into the open area. Without hesitation, the specialist ran to the litter and dragged the casualty to a position of relative safety. Throughout the entire engagement, Specialist Comer exposed himself to the fusillade as he moved from one position to another treating the numerous allied casualties. His determined actions served as a constant inspiration to his companions and contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the position. Specialist Four Comer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5230 (December 9, 1970)
Died 18 December 2009 buried in Blountville, Tennessee

CRAIN, CARROLL V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Carroll V. Crain (RA18432362), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 19th Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Crain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1966 while serving as chief of an artillery element during a massive Viet Cong attack in Binh Dinh Province. The two insurgent battalions began their attack with a mortar, recoilless rifle, and machine gun barrage which swept the camp. Although he sustained serious wounds in his left hand and right leg, Sergeant Crain raced through the intense fire to a howitzer position and began firing high explosive shells directly into the onrushing waves of insurgents. Fearlessly working while silhouetted against the flames of an ammunition blaze, he shouted rallying cries heard throughout the battery position. Exposing himself again to the hostile barrage, Sergeant Crain encouraged the men fighting the ammunition fire, then returned to the howitzer and resumed his fire. Although he was losing blood constantly and gradually weakening, when the men were forced to withdraw to another defensive point, Sergeant Crain helped evacuate other casualties, then seized a rifle and killed three insurgents in close fighting. He again refused medical treatment, assisted in rallying the men for a counterattack, and moved back into the unit’s forward positions to clear them of Viet Cong. Sergeant First Class Crain’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2389 (May 25, 1967)

CREWS, GARY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary E. Crews (US54823457), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Crews distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 July 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy mission in Hai Lang District. Private Crews’ company encountered heavy automatic weapons fire from well-concealed bunkers, pinning the men down and inflicting numerous casualties. Braving the enemy fusillade, he immediately went to the aid of his injured comrades. He was hit first by grenade fragments, temporally blinding him in the eye, and then by small arms fire in the arm. Ignoring his painful wounds, he continued on to the casualties and applied vital first aid. After carrying one seriously injured Soldier to safety, Private Crews returned to the battle and was wounded again, but remained to aid his companions until he was ordered to the rear for medical treatment. Private First Class Crews’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1148 (April 3, 1969)

DARNELL, JOHN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John E. Darnell, Jr. (RA13809976), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Darnell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 January 1968 as squad leader of an infantry company on a mission to evaluate the results of a friendly air strike in the Que Son Valley. As the company neared the top of a hill, its lead squad was pinned down by savage automatic weapons fire from a North Vietnamese Army unit occupying well concealed rock bunkers. Heedless of the hail of enemy bullets, Sergeant Darnell engaged the bunkers with a heavy and accurate barrage of shotgun fire. His fierce attack enabled the beleaguered troops to withdraw and evacuate their casualties. After carrying one of the wounded to safety, Sergeant Darnell organized a machine gun team and led it in a second assault on the entrenched enemy force. Hurling hand grenades and firing his shotgun, he killed at least two North Vietnamese and captured their weapons. His sudden, furious attack overwhelmed the hostile Soldiers, and the team overran and captured the fortified positions. Learning that his company’s second platoon was heavily engaged with another portion of the North Vietnamese unit, Sergeant Darnell unhesitantly maneuvered to its location and charged the insurgents, firing his shotgun until his ammunition was expended. He grabbed two automatic rifles from enemy Soldiers he had killed and continued his aggressive assault. Raking the hostile positions with devastating fire, he forced most of the North Vietnamese to temporarily withdraw. Sergeant Darnell began to evacuate his wounded comrades, but the enemy quickly resumed his withering fusillade. Sergeant Darnell again picked up his two captured assault rifles and, with bullets striking all around him, charged the enemy bunker complex. He threw grenades and delivered deadly fire on the North Vietnamese until all members of the platoon had successfully withdrawn from the raging battle area. His gallant and determined actions in close combat saved the lives of many fellow Soldiers and were responsible for an overwhelming victory. Staff Sergeant Darnell’ s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2249 (May 14, 1968)

DAVIS, Mitchell
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mitchell Davis, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Davis distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman during a reconnaissance patrol in Tay Ninh Province. As his platoon was crossing a clearing, it was ambushed by a hostile force firing B-40 rockets, automatic weapons, and claymore anti-personnel mines. The initial onslaught was concentrated primarily at the lead squad, inflicting numerous friendly casualties. Braving the barrage of enemy bullets, Private Davis darted across the fire-swept area to the location of the downed men. Immediately the private began administering first aid to his comrades’ wounds. Then, amid the unrelenting spray of hostile bullets, Private Davis dragged several of the severely wounded troops to a nearby position of relative safety. Meanwhile, the private’s platoon had established a defensive perimeter around the casualties and were fighting to repel the repeated belligerent charges. As the determined enemy attempted to overrun the allied position, Private Davis continued to treat his patients despite the hazards surrounding him. Private Davis’s intrepidity in the face of the enemy served as an inspiration to his comrades and rallied the friendly force in its successful resistance of the hostile assault. Private First Class Davis’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 871 (March 10, 1971)
Action Date: 6 March 1970

DAY, STEPHEN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Private First Class Stephen W. Day (ASN: RA-55706337), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Air Cavalry Division. Private First Class Day distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1966 while serving as acting squad leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry during a ground engagement against fortified hostile positions near Phu Huu. A fierce battle had ensued all day and Private Day’s company was ordered to make a final assault under cover of growing darkness. As the unit slowly advanced across the open rice paddy it suddenly received intense sniper fire. Spotting the Viet Cong positions, Private Day maneuvered two of his men forward to gain better firing positions, while he dauntlessly provided covering fire. When both men fell wounded, he realized his left flank was exposed and, disregarding the extreme danger, charged forward to help his comrades. In this gallant effort, Private Day was seriously hit in the chest and arm by hostile fire. Unmindful of his wounds, he continued to crawl to a covered position, from which he directed friendly fire on the insurgent emplacements. Each time he raised up to shout orders to his men, he came under a hail of Viet Cong fire. Unable to fire his weapon, Private Day courageously threw grenades into the insurgent positions until he was fatally wounded. His unimpeachable valor and profound concern for others enabled his company to finally defeat the numerically superior hostile force. Private First Class Day’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 465 (January 31, 1966)
Action Date: 1 December 1966

DELEO, JOSEPH D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph D. Deleo (US53812152), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Deleo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 July 1968 while serving as a medic on a reconnaissance patrol near Hue. His platoon came under intense hostile fire from a well entrenched enemy force. One man was seriously wounded and lay in the open only twenty meters to the front of a hostile automatic weapons emplacement. Attempts to rescue the man by other members of the unit were unsuccessful. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Deleo advanced twenty-five meters through a hail of enemy fire to his injured comrade and administered first aid. A rocket then exploded to his rear, seriously wounding another man. Specialist Deleo unhesitantly moved through the continuing fusillade to the second casualty, treated his wounds and supervised his evacuation. Almost immediately another cry for a medic came, this time to assist a Soldier who had tried to extract the first casualty and was wounded only a few feet from him. As Specialist Deleo neared the position occupied by the two men, the enemy suddenly unleashed a particularly savage barrage on their location. He sprang forward, pulled the two Soldiers close together and covered them with his body. He was hit in both legs and in the hand by the murderous fire, completely immobilizing him. Later, member of his element overran the aggressors and evacuated all three wounded men. Specialist Four Deleo’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5218 (November 10, 1968)

DENTINGER, DAVID D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David D. Dentinger (US51942572), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Dentinger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 February 1968 while leading a squad against four heavily fortified North Vietnamese Army bunkers near the city of Hue. Two of the positions were successfully destroyed, but the remaining fortifications continued to pour an intense volume of fire on Specialist Dentinger and his men. He and another Soldier advanced to cover afforded by a partially destroyed house to come within close range of the enemy. When his comrade attempted to throw a white phosphorous grenade through a window in the building at the communists’ positions, he was severely wounded by sniper fire and fell senseless to the floor. The armed grenade landed beside him. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own life, Specialist Dentinger dove toward the live grenade. Grasping it in his hand, he rolled over to an opening in the wall and threw the deadly missile toward the bunker. As he released the grenade it detonated, critically burning him. His quick action, however, caused the primary force of the explosion to be outside the building, and his wounded comrade was not harmed by the blast. Specialist Four Dentinger’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5429 (November 24, 1969)

*DOBRINSKA, THOMAS EARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Earl Dobrinska (0-5337688), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Dobrinska distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1968 as a platoon leader of an airmobile infantry company on a combat mission near Than Bon Pho. His unit had successfully obtained two objectives of its three goal assault, and Lieutenant Dobrinska, realizing the importance of the momentum of his platoon’s attack, continued charging the hostile emplacements. His platoon sustained several casualties and he repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy fire as he personally carried the casualties to safety. He then returned to his unit leading the attack against the well entrenched insurgents. As his platoon was temporarily driven back, he pulled two more wounded Soldiers to a covered position. Twice more he led his men forward, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy forces, only to be forced to withdraw each time by the intensity of the hostile fire. Disregarding his personal safety, Lieutenant Dobrinska then single-handedly charged the enemy automatic weapons position blocking his unit’s advance and succeeded in destroying it. During this assault, he was mortally wounded, but his courageous actions enabled his unit to seize the final objective and permitted the quick evacuation of the injured personnel. Second Lieutenant Dobrinska’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3201 (July 6, 1968)
Home Town: Antigo, Wisconsin

*DOUGLAS, CLARK ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clark Robert Douglas (187-40-5539), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Douglas distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman at Fire Support Base Jerri in Phuoc Long Province. During the early morning hours of 11 November 1969 a massive enemy shelling broke the silence, raining destruction on the compound and inflicting severe casualties among the men manning the perimeter bunkers. Without hesitation, Specialist Douglas moved immediately from the safety of his bunker toward cries for assistance. Although thrown to the ground by the burst of an impacting round only meters from his position, he crawled persistently forward into the fusillade. As soon as he reached the first wounded man, he began rendering assistance in a calm, professional manner. Just then, an enemy mortar round struck the ground nearby, inflicting mortal wounds to Specialist Douglas. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 103 (January 12, 1970)
Home Town: Corning, New York

*DUNSMORE, LEO PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leo Paul Dunsmore (RA11903314), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Dunsmore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 February 1968 as a medic accompanying an infantry company during a search and destroy operation in Quan Huong Tra Province. The unit was moving toward a treeline on the far side of a rice paddy when it was subjected to heavy mortar, recoilless rifle and small arms fire from a North Vietnamese Army force occupying entrenched and fortified positions in the woods. Private Dunsmore’s platoon, the lead element, was temporarily pinned down behind earthen grave mounds, but soon began to assault the enemy across the one hundred meters of open rice paddy. The platoon engaged the North Vietnamese at close range, but was forced to withdraw from the increasingly intense enemy fusillade. Seeing many casualties lying fully exposed to the enemy weapons, Private Dunsmore unhesitant moved back into the open terrain to aid his comrades. He repeatedly crossed the bullet-swept rice paddy to skillfully treat the casualties and carry them to safety. While administering aid to one fallen Soldier, Private Dunsmore was mortally wounded by the relentless enemy fire. Private First Class Dunsmore extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1570 (April 8, 1968)
Home Town: Warwick, Rhode Island

*EUTSLER, JOHN WESLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Wesley Eutsler (US51883582), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Eutsler distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1969 as a point man during a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province. As Private Eutsler was leading his squad down a narrow path, he came upon a well camouflaged bunker complex manned by two companies of the North Vietnamese Army. He immediately signaled a warning to his comrades and, disregarding his safety, advanced on the forward enemy position. Although met by intense hostile fire, he killed one of the communists and continued across an open field to the bunker, which he destroyed with hand grenades. He then engaged a squad of enemy troops who were placing deadly fire on his element, enabling his comrades to withdraw to a more secure location. While moving back to rejoin his unit and report the North Vietnamese positions, he was fatally wounded by a burst of hostile fire. Private First Class Eutsler’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1146 (April 3, 1969)
Home Town: Spencerville, Ohio

*EVANS, DONALD PATRICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Patrick Evans (US54979872), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 November 1968 while serving as a point man during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in a dense bamboo jungle near Landing Zone Jake. Private Evans detected an enemy ambush and immediately warned his company. The unit attempted to flank the North Vietnamese Army Soldiers, who were entrenched in a well camouflaged and heavily fortified bunker complex. Fearlessly leading one of the flanking elements and braving the automatic weapons fire, he spearheaded an aggressive assault against the hostile positions. Moving ahead of the other troops, Private Evans single-handedly destroyed four bunkers with rifle fire and grenades, allowing the balance of the company to advance until it became pinned down by three adversaries in an expertly camouflaged bunker. Unmindful of his safety, he immediately charged the position and forced the North Vietnamese to retreat. As he continued to pursue the communists, he was mortally wounded by an enemy sniper. Private First Class Evans’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 425 (February 6, 1969)
Home Town: Lake Orion, Michigan

*EVANS, JERRY DEWAIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerry Dewain Evans (US52966929), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1968 as a rifleman of an airmobile infantry company conducting an assault on a series of well fortified enemy bunker positions near Hue. Specialist Evans’ company was immobilized by heavy enemy sniper fire from one of the bunker complexes. Realizing his unit would suffer heavy casualties unless it moved, he maneuvered across the bullet-swept terrain, attacking the bunker from which the company was receiving the most intense fire. Without regard for his personal safety, he mounted the fortification’s roof and fired inside the emplacement, eliminating four enemy troops. Moving from the bunker, Specialist Four Evans was mortally wounded by sniper fire from another fortified position. Specialist Four Evans’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3202 (July 6, 1968)
Home Town: Holland Patent, New York

*EWING, JERRY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerry Lee Ewing (RA67154815), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private Ewing distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early hours of 21 March 1969 while serving as a perimeter guard at Landing Zone White in Tay Ninh Province. The base came under rocket and mortar fire, followed by attacks by North Vietnamese Army sappers. A rocket exploded against the side of Private Ewing’s bunker, collapsing it and forcing him and another guard to seek shelter from the communists’ barrage. As they made their way to a trench, Private Ewing noticed one of the enemy throwing a grenade at his companion. Yelling a warning, he pushed his comrade into the trench, jumped on top of him, and used his own body to shield him from the explosion. By absorbing the full impact of the grenade, he saved his fellow Soldier from injury. Private Ewing’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1941 (June 3, 1969)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

*FONTAINE, MICHAEL ARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Arthur Fontaine (RA12870319), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Fontaine distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1969 as a medic during a search and clear mission northeast of Quan Loi. His company made contact with an estimated reinforced company sized North Vietnamese Army force which was concealed in the underbrush and was armed with rockets, mortars, and both semiautomatic and automatic weapons. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fire, Specialist Fontaine treated the members of his platoon who were wounded and brought them to a central location where they could be evacuated. When the communists launched a massive ground assault, he fearlessly moved to the area of the fiercest fighting and continued to care for his suffering comrades. Suddenly an enemy mortar round exploded near an automatic weapon position, wounding three Soldiers. Despite the heavy concentration of hostile fire directed at the site, he rushed forward to their aid. After he had bandaged two of the men and was nearing the third, the aggressors’ fire suddenly intensified. Specialist Fontaine threw himself on the man to protect him and was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade, but saved the life of his stricken comrade. Specialist Four Fontaine’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1413 (April 23, 1969)
Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana

FULLER, SHERMAN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sherman G. Fuller (RA13680571), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Fuller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as squad leader with an element of the air cavalry division during a combat air assault near Bong Son. Immediately upon arrival, the friendly unit was engaged by a heavily armed North Vietnamese force. In an attempt to eliminate a prime machine gun position, Sergeant Fuller advanced with a recoilless rifle team to provide covering fire while the weapon was being sighted. Before the crew would reach a favorable position, the North Vietnamese delivered accurate, withering fire into the area, wounding two men and killing two. Sergeant Fuller realizing the critical condition of his comrades, fearlessly rushed along the battle line to obtain help. After organizing a rescue team and directing them to the two Soldiers, he went to the assistance of a wounded medical aidman. Undaunted by the increasing firefight activity and devastating air strikes in close proximity, he began administering first aid to the man. A North Vietnamese machine gunner then began raking the area with voluminous fire. In a selfless display of dedicated courage, Sergeant Fuller covered his wounded comrade with his own body and was hit. Despite his painful wound, he continued to engage the enemy until he was forced to be evacuated. Sergeant Fuller’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4030 (August 8, 1967)

GASKIN, GORDON W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon W. Gaskin (RA15843739), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Gaskin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 January 1968 while serving as a medical aidman at Landing Zone Leslie in the Que Son Valley. His unit’s perimeter was hit by a North Vietnamese barrage of rocket, mortar, recoilless rifle, automatic and semiautomatic weapon fire, followed by a vicious ground assault which resulted in fierce hand-to-hand combat in many areas. Specialist Gaskin exposed himself to the heavy volume of hostile fire as he moved to the perimeter in search of wounded Soldiers. Although he was frequently fired on by the enemy, he fearlessly rescued his injured comrades and brought them to his aid station. During the seven-hour battle Specialist Gaskin treated over fifty casualties, sterilizing pieces of clothing to construct makeshift bandages after he had exhausted all his medical supplies. By repeatedly quitting his protected position to help his fellow Soldiers, he saved many lives. Specialist Four Gaskin’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5179 (November 6, 1968)

*GLINES, ALLEN BRUCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Allen Bruce Glines (US56648514), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Glines distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 January 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy mission in Hoi An Province. Private Glines was the point position for his unit, moving ahead of his platoon as it advanced across a series of open rice paddies. Suddenly a large, well armed enemy force placed heavy fire on the Platoon from concealed positions in a woodline. Private Glines immediately charged the enemy despite the fusillade. He moved forward in the open, intent only on destroying the enemy and aiding those elements of his platoon which were pinned down in the rice paddy. His accurate automatic rifle fire permitted his trapped comrades to reach cover. Assaulting the nearest bunker, he destroyed it, killing its three defenders. He then placed flanking fire on the enemy positions in his vicinity, drawing the insurgents’ fire to himself as he assaulted a second bunker. He was mortally wounded before he reached it. Private First Class Glines’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3476 (July 19, 1968)
Home Town: Layton, Utah

GODLEWSKI, LARRY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry E. Godlewski (RA11678082), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Godlewski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 as a team leader during a search and clear operation near Landing Zone Billie. In the initial contact with a large, well-armed North Vietnamese Army force, part of Specialist Godlewski’s company was pinned down and eight men in the point squad were wounded. Rushing forward through the deadly barrage, he placed suppressive fire on the aggressors which killed two of them and enabled his comrades to extract the casualties. During a lull in the fighting, he and another man volunteered to accompany the company commander on a reconnaissance and the three men advanced into the thick underbrush. Spotting an enemy bunker, they charged the position and succeeded in destroying it, but the company commander was hit by hostile fire. As Specialist Godlewski and his companion ran to their fallen commander, heavy fire erupted from a second enemy emplacement. Specialist Godlewski used his body to shield the stricken officer, receiving wounds from a hostile rocket, and after two medics arrived, he positioned himself in front of them to place effective protective fire. The commander was declared dead and was being moved to the rear when another rocket suddenly exploded, killing one of the medics and wounding the others. Suffering from multiple fragmentation wounds, Specialist Godlewski crawled to one of his injured comrades and managed to drag him from under the communists’ fusillade to the evacuation site. Specialist Four Godlewski’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1651 (May 9, 1969)

*GORTON, GARY BRUCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary Bruce Gorton (RA51447475), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On 17 February 1966, Sergeant Gorton, serving as mortar squad leader, was accompanying his unit to establish a blocking position when they contacted and attacked a Viet Cong heavy weapons battalion. Moving his squad to some nearby shell craters, Sergeant Gorton immediately engaged the insurgents and delivered deadly and accurate mortar support to his company until his ammunition was expended. Under his direction he employed his squad as riflemen and successfully averted the Viet Cong assault against their sector defenses. The insurgents regrouped and again charged the American perimeter. With compete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Gorton, exposed himself to an intense hail of automatic and small arms fire, throwing grenades and firing his weapon at the advancing Viet Cong forces. Sergeant Gorton killed five of the insurgents and personally captured a machine gun. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 158 (July 14, 1966)
Home Town: New York, New York

GREENE, STANLEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stanley E. Greene (US55985271), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Greene distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 October 1967 while serving with an airmobile infantry platoon on a search and destroy mission in the Bong Son Plains. While sweeping through a village, his squad observed a man attempting to escape through the window of a hut. Specialist Greene provided cover to another Soldier who immediately dashed to halt the man. He then saw a second man trying to hide in a large basket beside the hut and moved in to capture him. As other members of his unit came around the hut to assist in the capture, the man jumped from his hiding place and threw a grenade. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Greene shouted a warning to his fellow Soldiers and then wounded the fleeing insurgent with an accurate burst from his rifle. Heedless of the grave threat to his life, he dashed to the grenade, picked it up, and attempted to hurl it out of range of his comrades. He was seriously wounded when the grenade exploded as it left his hand. His unselfish devotion to the safety of his fellow Soldiers without regard for his own welfare was responsible for saving three of their lives. Specialist Four Greene’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6348 (December 10, 1967)

*GREGORY, BOB LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bob Leroy Gregory (0-69663), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Gregory distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 and 3 January 1968 as commanding officer of an airmobile cavalry battalion conducting operations against a North Vietnamese Army division in the Que Sons Valley. During the afternoon of 2 January, one of his companies on a search and destroy mission became heavily engaged with an enemy force of undetermined size. Colonel Gregory immediately boarded his command and control helicopter and flew to the battle site. Disregarding a hail of hostile ground fire tracking his aircraft, he remained over the raging firefight and directed gunship fire and aerial rocket artillery on enemy positions. When the ground commander attempted to move his main force to relieve one platoon that was surrounded by the North Vietnamese, Colonel Gregory instructed his pilot to descend, leaped from the helicopter amid intense automatic weapons fire and rallied the troops in their maneuver. As darkness approached, he directed the helicopter evacuation of wounded and supervised the extraction of the beleaguered company. During the early morning hours of 3 January, the battalion fire base was attacked by two North Vietnamese Army regiments. Braving savage rocket, mortar and automatic weapons fire, Colonel Gregory unhesitantly moved from the relative safety of his bunker to the tactical operations center, where he quickly organized his defenses to repel the attack. He repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fusillade as he moved among his troops and encouraged their fierce fight against the determined attackers. His fearless and inspiring leadership was responsible for the successful defense of the base and over two hundred North Vietnamese killed. Lieutenant Colonel Gregory’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1535 (April 5, 1968)
Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

*HALEY, PATRICK LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Patrick Lawrence Haley (0-5531115), Captain (Armor), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Haley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 October 1966 while serving as pilot of an armed command helicopter during an aerial attack on Viet Cong forces escaping the Ngot Bay area. Completely disregarding intense hostile fire, Captain Haley flew for one hour at very low altitudes in an attempt to locate and fix hostile targets. He dauntlessly remained at the most critical points of combat, never permitting the enemy to pin down friendly ground elements. When a friendly squad received intense Viet Cong fire and refused to retreat because of a casualty lying in an exposed position, Captain Haley unhesitatingly flew between the opposing forces to divert the hostile barrage. Although his ammunition was expended, he persuaded the friendly element to withdraw, then landed and picked up the wounded man. His helicopter was severely damaged by enemy fire while on the ground, but he was able to fly the casualty 150 meters to a safe zone. His heroic actions were highly instrumental in killing 320 Viet Cong and the saving of many American lives. Captain Haley’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2282 (May 21, 1967)
Home Town: La Salle, Illinois
CPT Haley was killed in action on 18 April 1967.

HALL, SEQUOYAH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sequoyah Hall, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Hall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 April 1970 while serving as squad leader during an operation in Phuoc Long Province. As Sergeant Hall’s squad moved through the dense jungle, they came under a heavy barrage of rocket propelled grenades and small arms fire from an undetermined sized enemy force. Although seriously wounded by the initial burst of fire, Sergeant hall began adjusting artillery fire upon the well-concealed foe and directed his men into defensive positions. As the hostile force attempted to assault the friendly elements locations, the sergeant met the brunt of the attack and repelled the assailants with devastating volleys of automatic weapon fire. After his ammunition was expended, Sergeant Hall painfully crawled forward and tossed fragmentation grenades at the enemy which blocked their avenue of assault and forced them to withdraw. Sergeant Hall’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5395 (December 28, 1970)

HAMILTON, GEORGE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George E. Hamilton (RA19842746), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Hamilton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 August 1966 while serving as a machine gunner on a search and destroy mission near Plei Me. When the lead element suddenly made contact with a large Viet Cong force, Private Hamilton’s platoon quickly advanced to provide support. With complete disregard for his safety while receiving sniper fire, he deliberately exposed himself to the hostile fire and killed a sniper in a nearby tree. When the two platoons withdrew and set up a defensive perimeter, Private Hamilton voluntarily remained behind to provide covering fire. Later, when the insurgents attempted to overrun the small American force, he set up his machine gun in an exposed position to provide the most effective fire. His suppressive fire was primarily responsible for the defeat of three human wave assaults, the destruction of one Viet Cong machine gun, and two automatic weapon emplacements. Although wounded in the shoulder during these fierce attacks, Private Hamilton dauntlessly tossed hand grenades into the charging insurgents. He again exposed himself to the intense fire as he moved about the area throwing hostile grenades back on the Viet Cong positions. His exceptional gallantry ended only when an exploding grenade knocked him unconscious. Private First Class Hamilton’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6939 (December 19, 1966)

HAMMER, MARTIN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Martin J. Hammer (OF-101931), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 May 1966, First Lieutenant Hammer was serving as 2d Platoon Leader, Company A, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), near the insurgent-held village of Than Binh when they became engaged with a force of North Vietnamese estimated to be of battalion size. As the company moved in on the insurgents, the 2d Platoon moved from its reserve position to block an avenue of escape around the company’s right flank. Despite the increased volume of insurgent fire, Lieutenant Hammer led his platoon across more than 150 meters of sniper infested area to an effective blocking position against the insurgent’s withdrawal. While moving from squad to squad, he was wounded in the wrist. Requiring help, Lieutenant Hammer braved the fire to direct a unit that had been sent up to help his beleaguered platoon and was wounded a second time. Later the insurgents launched a suicidal grenade attack on the 2d Platoon’s left flank and Lieutenant Hammer single-handedly repelled the attack. Discovering that one of his men had been wounded, he again braved the insurgent’s fire and dragged him to safety. While directing the 1st Platoon that was sent up to reinforce his line, he received a serious shrapnel wound in the chest but still refused evacuation in order to remain and direct his men during the remainder of the fight. Only after his platoon was in its new position and the wounded taken care of did he allow himself to be evacuated. First Lieutenant Hammer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 216 (September 8, 1966)

*HARRIS, ROY GREEN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roy Green Harris, Jr. (RA14352191), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Second Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Platoon Sergeant Harris distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1967 while serving as a platoon sergeant of an infantry platoon on a search and destroy mission near Phan Thiet. As his men left the helicopters upon infiltration, they were savagely attacked by a large Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons from well fortified positions around the landing zone. The intensity of the enemy barrage prevented his men from deploying in defensive positions quickly, but Sergeant Harris stood up in the hail of bullets and moved among his men directing their fire on the hostile positions. After gaining fire superiority, he moved to the front of his men and led the platoon in a fierce charge on the enemy fortifications, personally capturing one prisoner. Several hostile Soldiers surprised him as he moved the prisoner toward his platoon leader, and he was wounded by the savage fire. He remained calm in the face of the attack and killed one to the insurgents while routing the rest with deadly fire. As he moved along a stream with the prisoner, he was seriously wounded by a Viet Cong sniper. Ignoring his own safety, he continued to direct the assault on the enemy and inspired his men to defeat the determined Viet Cong. He was mortally wounded while fearlessly leading his men in the face of overwhelming odds. Platoon Sergeant Harris’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5670 (November 4, 1967)
Home Town: New York, New York

*HARRISON, PAUL JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul James Harrison (RA19766351), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Harrison distinguished himself on 21 May 1966 while serving as a rifleman during a combat mission. On this date, the mortar platoon of Specialist Four Harrison’s company was scheduled to be the last element to be extracted from the operational area. As the last rifle platoon was extracted, the mortar platoon suddenly received intense hostile fire from an estimated Viet Cong company which began attacking in full force. Observing that the platoon’s single mortar weapon was destroyed during the initial attack, Specialist Four Harrison immediately rushed through the intense hostile fire and began delivering suppressive fire onto the advancing Viet Cong. Inspired by his aggressiveness, Specialist Four Harrison’s comrades held their ground as long as possible. When the ammunition supply became critically low and position after position succumbed to the overwhelming insurgent force, the remaining members of the mortar platoon were forced to withdraw. Recognizing that many of the withdrawing troops were hit by Viet Cong fire, Specialist Four Harrison decided to hold his ground alone and provided as much fire cover as possible for his comrades. With complete disregard his safety, Specialist Four Harrison advanced forward to a vantage point to draw the hostile fire away from his comrades and to more efficiently provide fire cover for the withdrawing survivors. When his ammunition was expended and the insurgent force was advancing toward his position, Specialist Four Harrison fearlessly jumped from his foxhole, charged the Viet Cong and engaged them in hand to hand combat. He continued to inflict casualties until he was finally overcome by the surmountable odds. Through his courage, he undoubtedly saved the remainder of his unit. Specialist Four Harrison’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6409 (November 18, 1966)
Home Town: Lakewood, California

HARVEY, THOMAS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas H. Harvey (0-83266), Major (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major Harvey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 April 1967 while serving as platoon leader of a helicopter team flying a reconnaissance and support mission for ground operations near Duc Pho. Catching a North Vietnamese unit in the open, Major Harvey made a series of low-level passes firing his rockets and machine guns. Expending his rockets, he then hovered directly over the insurgents so his gunners could direct deadly fire upon them. His helicopter received heavy damage from ground fire, but he continued the attack until his aircraft ran low of fuel. After returning to his base to change aircraft Major Harvey flew back to the battle area. Again locating Viet Cong in the open, he made a treetop-level rocket pass into the face of withering fire. His rockets failed to fire so he again hovered over the hostile forces while his door gunners inflicted heavy casualties. Once more returning to base after his helicopter was damaged and a crewmember wounded, he again changed aircraft and flew back to support the infantrymen. His courageous actions were instrumental in bringing heavy casualties on the enemy and successfully completing the mission. Major Harvey’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4487 (September 2, 1967)

HATTERSLEY, ROGER K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roger K. Hattersley (RA16837989), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Hattersley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as machine gunner during a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. While advancing, Private Hattersley’s platoon received intense fire from hostile camouflaged positions 40 meters to its front. He immediately dropped to the ground and poured a high rate of fire into the Viet Cong emplacements to protect his wounded comrades who were struggling to reach cover. Although enemy fire constantly raked the ground around him, he held his position until ordered back by his commander. When his ammunition ran out, he raced to the side of a casualty lying in the open, seized his weapon, and provided his own covering fire while helping the man to withdraw. With replenished ammunition, he resumed his devastating attack on the insurgents. Realizing that his trapped unit would continue to suffer severe casualties unless something was done, Private Hattersley, of his own accord, jumped to his feet firing his weapon from the hip, and fearlessly charged the Viet Cong emplacement. He was wounded halfway to the bunker, but indomitably continued his assault on the hostile stronghold and disappeared into a hedgerow. His attack silenced the main enemy firing position and enabled his unit to overcome the insurgents. Private Hattersley was found wounded a second time and lying unconscious next to a Viet Cong bunker where a dead insurgent was inside. Private First Class Hattersley’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2319 (May 22, 1967)

HAYNIE, HARRIS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harris R. Haynie (US54375159), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Haynie distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 May 1967 while serving as a combat medic of an infantry platoon on a reconnaissance mission near Duc Pho. While moving through thick jungle toward Viet Cong positions spotted earlier from the air, the lead elements of his platoon were pinned down by heavy automatic weapons, mortar and machine gun fire from a numerically superior hostile force. Seeing two of the point men wounded, Specialist Haynie ran through withering fire from his position at the rear of the column to treat them. Seriously wounded by grenade fragments, he refused medical treatment and carried the casualties to safety. Two squads of reinforcements managed to land inside the perimeter, but one man was hit and fell into the open landing zone. Disregarding his own safety, Specialist Haynie dashed across the bullet-swept clearing and pulled the man to safety. A short time later an ammunition re-supply helicopter was shot down in flames outside the perimeter, trapping the crew inside. Once again he braved withering fire and a possible explosion to run to the craft and pull the men from the wreckage. Throughout the three-hour battle, he exposed himself continually to hostile fire, treating the wounded and boosting the morale of his comrades. Specialist Four Haynie’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5070 (October 4, 1967)

HELVEY, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Helvey (0-95281), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Helvey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 while serving as a company commander during a search and destroy mission near Landing Zone Ross in the Que Son Valley. His company was attacked from well-concealed and emplaced positions by an estimated North Vietnamese Army battalion firing machine guns and mortars. One platoon was cut off from the rest of the unit. Captain Helvey sent a call for reinforcements to a sister company and an armored cavalry troop. Then, with complete disregard for his safety, he ran to an advantageous but completely exposed position to direct artillery, aerial rockets and helicopter gunship fire into the massing North Vietnamese. When the armored personnel carriers and tanks arrived he directed an assault which enabled his isolated platoon to rejoin the rest of the unit. The sister company fought through the enemy lines and the three units formed a defensive perimeter. As the North Vietnamese were reinforced and increased their supporting heavy weapons fires, the armored troop’s commander was mortally wounded, and vital communications equipment was destroyed. Captain Helvey personally led several counterattacks on the surrounding enemy searching for weaknesses in their envelopment. Determining that a breakout was imperative, he again exposed himself to the intense fire to coordinate the maneuver with all elements. In the breakout the other company commander became a casualty, and Captain Helvey exposed himself to increasingly heavy fire to direct that unit’s movement. As he continued the attempted escape, he led his men through an enemy trench line, fighting off the North Vietnamese at ranges as close as three feet. He was painfully wounded in the leg during this action, but he refused medical treatment for himself to successfully complete his units’ escape, leading them to the comparative safety of Landing Zone Ross. Captain Helvey’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5219 (November 10, 1968)

*HENNESSY, DANIEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Daniel A. Hennessy (0-5326579), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Hennessy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 December 1966 while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 8th Cavalry n a search and destroy mission in Quan Hoai An Province. When his platoon suddenly received intense hostile fire from a nearby village, Lieutenant Hennessy dauntlessly led an assault on the Viet Cong positions. Maneuvering through a hail of bullets, he moved to the head of the platoon and was the first man to enter the hamlet. Unmindful of his vulnerable position, Lieutenant Hennessy fearlessly engaged the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades. He then called for artillery strikes within ten meters of his own position, which allowed his platoon to reach cover at the edge of a rice paddy. As he shouted orders and pointed out hostile emplacements, Lieutenant Hennessy was critically wounded by Viet Cong fire. Realizing that his wounds were fatal, he courageously continued to direct his men, until finally turning over command to his platoon sergeant with his last words. Demonstrating unimpeachable valor and profound concern for the men under his command, he inspired them to overwhelm and defeat the entrenched hostile force. First Lieutenant Hennessy’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1658 (April 13, 1967)
Home Town: Newtown, Pennsylvania

HEPP, FERDINAND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ferdinand Hepp (0-5326580), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Hepp distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 October 1966 while serving as platoon leader during a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. As his unit approached a likely ambush location, Lieutenant Hepp radioed for artillery strikes in the area, then moved forward with ten men to investigate some abandoned bunkers. After advancing 50 meters, the element was hit by intense fire from a reinforced Viet Cong company. Lieutenant Hepp tried to link up with the rest of his platoon, but the insurgents had closed behind him and had the small group surrounded. Without a radio, he led his men into the empty bunkers he had just checked and placed himself at the best point to control his men in defending their position until reinforcements arrived. When ammunition ran low, one of his men crawled out to retrieve some rifle ammunition and an anti-tank weapon. As he crawled back into the foxhole with them, however, an enemy shell exploded the weapon, killing the Soldier and wounding Lieutenant Hepp. Regaining consciousness an hour later, he found himself nearly deaf, and only one man in his element remained unwounded. During the night, insurgents tried to creep into his position. Lieutenant Hepp calmly killed five of them at nearly point blank range. After directing the defenses of his nearly hopeless position against an overwhelming hostile force for over ten hours, Lieutenant Hepp received reinforcements and dauntlessly led his men through two more hours of fighting before the Viet Cong were driven off. First Lieutenant Hepp’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2324 (May 23, 1967)

HIGHTOWER, THOMAS K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas K. Hightower (0-89905), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Hightower distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 February 1967 whiles serving as a company commander with elements of the 12th Cavalry during a battle with an entrenched enemy force at An Qui. After being called upon to link up with a besieged friendly platoon, he ordered his company on a rapid march to the point of contact. Employing smoke to screen his movement, Captain Hightower personally led a rescue team across the bullet-swept rice paddy to the endangered Soldiers. Calmly encouraging those who were able to make their way to safety, he supervised the evacuation of the critical casualties and dead. Hoping to relieve another encircled element, Captain Hightower dauntlessly led two platoons under cover of darkness against the enemy positions. As the force advanced along a trenchline, it suddenly received intense hostile machine gun fire, which killed one man and wounded seven others. Contemptuous of the extreme dangers, Captain Hightower rallied his men and charged forward in an assault that silenced the insurgent emplacement. Crawling on to within a meter of another enemy position, he fearlessly dropped two grenades into the trench and killed three Viet Cong. Inspired by his courageous actions, the two platoons swept through the hostile lines and captured many insurgent weapons and valuable equipment. Captain Hightower’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2693 (June 6, 1967)

*HILL, RICHARD GARFIELD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Garfield Hill (248-80-4103), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Hill distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as squad leader during a patrol southwest of Fire Support Base Compton. When an enemy force opened fire from a flanking location, Sergeant Hill maneuvered his squad into advantageous positions, quickly eliminating six enemy troops. His squad then swept forward and riddled the hostile emplacements with rifle fire. As gunships moved in to bombard the enemy with rockets, Sergeant Hill assisted in evacuating the wounded. Although his men had been ordered to provide security, upon learning that the body of a fellow squad leader had fallen in a wall-forward position, Sergeant Hill immediately volunteered to accompany another squad as it assaulted. Valiantly pressing forward, he eliminated two enemy bunkers single-handedly. As he attempted to destroy a third position, he was mortally wounded by enemy rocket fire. Staff Sergeant Hill’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 446 (February 16, 1970)
Home Town: Essex, Maryland

HITTI, JOHN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John L. Hitti (0-99872), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Hitti distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1966 while serving as a Task Force commander during the relief of a unit besieged by Viet Cong. When his first platoon had left the landing zone and moved halfway across an open field, it was struck by accurate machine gun fire and pinned down. While Captain Hitti directed the return fire, he spotted a hidden bunker and personally killed its occupants. Ignoring the bullets striking around him, he then crawled across the ravaged field to another bunker, killed one man, and routed the others. As one insurgent fled, Captain Hitti darted in and out of a hedgerow, in full view of the Viet Cong, and killed him. He cleared a third bunker, then stood up in the midst of the fighting to signal the pinned down platoon to withdraw. Deploying his men to approach from three sides, Captain Hitti led them in overrunning the enemy and destroying the fortified enemy complex. After evacuation helicopters had removed the casualties, he began adjusting artillery fire which protected his company from Viet Cong assault throughout the night. His tactical skill and fearless composure under fire turned an imminent disaster into a costly defeat for the enemy. Captain Hitti’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1220 (March 20, 1967)

HUGHES, GEORGE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George W. Hughes (0-5325585), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Hughes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 May 1966 while commanding an anti-tank platoon during a dismounted combat operation near Bong Son. As the unit moved across an open rice paddy, it suddenly received intense mortar and recoilless rifle fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Hughes ran through the exploding rounds to coordinate an assault on the woodline to his front. As the platoon began advancing, he constantly exposed himself while moving between his men, shouting encouragement and directing fire on the insurgent positions. Approximately 300 meters short of the woodline, the unit was pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from a reinforced Viet Cong battalion. Since withdrawal was impossible due to mortar fire to his rear, Lieutenant Hughes dauntlessly led his platoon in three attempts to break through the hostile lines. Though wounded and suffering from a badly twisted ankle, he continued to exhibit leadership and personal courage that was an inspiration to his men. Throughout the three hour battle, Lieutenant Hughes disregarded his safety to direct the beleaguered unit. When the platoon was finally extracted, he again exposed himself to the hostile fire to ensure that all his men were evacuated before entering the armored vehicles himself. His composure under fire saved his platoon and inflicted heavy casualties on a numerically superior hostile force. Lieutenant Hughes’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6925 (December 19, 1966)

HUNT, TOM C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Tom C. Hunt, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Hunt distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 July 1970 while serving s medical aidman during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. During contact with a determined and well-equipped enemy element, the allies suffered numerous casualties. Ignoring the intense enemy fire, Specialist Hunt moved through the contact area to treat wounded Soldiers. After stabilizing the condition of several casualties, he removed them to rear positions and prepared them for helicopter evacuation. At this time, the specialist was informed that two other allied medical aidmen had been fatally wounded in the forward contact area. Without hesitation, he maneuvered to a forward position and treated two seriously wounded Soldiers. When an exploding enemy rocket seriously wounded a nearby allied machine gunner, Specialist Hunt immediately went to his aid. Although wounded several times by an enemy machine gun as he treated his patient, the specialist continued his treatment until he collapsed from loss of blood. Specialist Four Hunt’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5008 (November 4, 1970)

JACKSON, WARREN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Warren G. Jackson, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Medical Company, 215th Combat Support Battalion (Separate), 3d Brigade (Separate), 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Chief Warrant Officer Jackson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 June 1971 while serving as aircraft commander of a UH-1H medical evacuation helicopter answering an urgent medical evacuation request for Charlie Company, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry. This unit had sustained eight critically wounded patients while engaging an undetermined size force of North Vietnamese troops situated in well-fortified bunkers. While Chief Warrant Officer Jackson circled the contact site, he observed another medical evacuation helicopter, answering the same urgent call for evacuation, sustain serious damage from ground fire and crash in flames. Disregarding his personal safety, Chief Warrant Officer Jackson immediately descended his helicopter through a small opening in the jungle canopy to the site of the crippled aircraft and its crew. Enduring intense hostile fire from enemy Soldiers advancing from the surrounding woodline, Chief Warrant Officer Jackson remained in control of the situation by directing suppressive fire from nearby Cobra gunships which stopped the enemy’s attack. The time gained by this act allowed the downed crew to be loaded on his aircraft for evacuation to safety. As Chief Warrant Officer Jackson began his take-off, the burning helicopter’s fuel cells exploded requiring him to make immediate evasive maneuvers to avoid having his own aircraft destroyed by the blast. Upon leaving the immediate area, Chief Warrant Officer Jackson’s aircraft was again subjected to devastating small arms fire, but due to his calm and professional attitude, disaster was again averted. Chief Warrant Officer Jackson’s devotion to duty and concern for his fellow Soldiers led him to the same embattled area twice again that day with his damaged aircraft; thus, eight more wounded troops were safely evacuated. Chief Warrant Officer Jackson’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 871 (May 1, 1972)

JENKINS, WILBUR G., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wilbur G. Jenkins, Jr. (0-65099), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Calvary Division (Airmobile). Lieutenant Colonel Jenkins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 September 1967 while leading a combat operation near Bong Son. An element of his battalion defending a bridge was heavily attacked late at night by a numerically superior North Vietnamese force. Colonel Jenkins immediately secured a helicopter and flew to the battle site to assess the situation. On the first pass over the bridge, he could see no sign of any activity. He ordered the pilot to land and jumped to the ground armed only with a pistol and two grenades. Savage enemy fire erupted all around him as he touched the ground, but he completely disregarded his own safety and ordered the pilot to leave. With bullets striking all around him, he dashed to the friendly positions and braved withering fire to place his men in a tight defensive perimeter. Continually exposing himself to the enemy weapons, he encouraged and inspired his men to fight furiously and repel the fanatical hostile assaults. As the fighting began to abate, he moved forward with one of his men to count the battle casualties. An enemy Soldier jumped up in front of him, and in an exchange of fire at point blank range, Colonel Jenkins was wounded. When reinforcements arrived he remained on the ground until they had secured a defensive perimeter. After assuring himself that all the wounded had been put aboard evacuation helicopters, he permitted his own evacuation. His exemplary and aggressive leadership had inspired his men to overcome staggering odds and inflict a decisive defeat on the determined enemy attackers. Lieutenant Colonel Jenkins’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6337 (December 10, 1967)

*KANESHIRO, EDWARD NOBORU (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Noboru Kaneshiro (RA10113707), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Kaneshiro distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1966 while serving as a squad leader in an Infantry Platoon during a search and destroy mission at Phu Huu 2, Kimson Valley, Republic of Vietnam. Not knowing that the Village was heavily fortified and garrisoned by North Vietnamese troops in vastly superior force, two squads of the platoon had deployed to its center, while Sergeant Kaneshiro and squad scouted the more open terrain eastward. A fully bunkered and wholly concealed trench system ran the length of the village on the west side. From that source, machinegun and rifle fire suddenly came against the two squads at center, killing the platoon leader, the point man, wounding four others, then flattening and immobilizing the survivors. Sergeant Kaneshiro moved with his men to the sounds of the fire. Swiftly reading the situation, seeing the fire from the big trench had to be stopped if anyone was to survive, Sergeant Kaneshiro first deployed his men to cover, then crawled forward to attack it alone. He began by grenading from the parapet, while flattened, and his first round, entering the aperture of the bunker, silenced the machinegun and killed the gunner that had opened action. That done, with five grenades and his M-16 to sustain his assault, Sergeant Kaneshiro jumped into the trench to sweep its length, where it fronted the two pinned squads. Over the distance of about 35 meters, he worked the ditch alone, destroying one enemy group with M-16 fire and two others with grenade fires. By the end of his sweep, the able-bodied survivors of the two squads were again standing and preparing to move the dead and wounded. Sergeant Kaneshiro’s assault enabled the orderly extrication and reorganization of the platoon which was the beginning of a larger action, and final success for the arms of the United States. Sergeant Kaneshiro’s conspicuous gallantry and uncommon heroism under fire, at the cost of his life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 46 (October 26, 1967)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

*KAUHAIHAO, JOHN KUULEI
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Kuulei Kauhaihao (575-42-7379), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Kauhaihao distinguished himself during a reconnaissance-in-force operation in Tay Ninh Province. He was leading his platoon over thick jungle terrain at the point of their company when they were fired upon by a battalion-size force of North Vietnamese regulars occupying bunker fortifications. Lieutenant Kauhaihao quickly directed his men to cover behind several large, bamboo covered dirt mounds. As the rest of the company moved up to lend supporting fire to the pinned down point element, they were caught in a crossfire from flanking enemy bunkers. Seizing upon a momentary lull in the exchange of fire, Lieutenant Kauhaihao then hacked an opening through the bamboo growing over the dirt mound behind which he took cover. In the next fifteen minutes, he hurled more than thirty hand grenades through this opening at the enemy bunkers. In so doing, Lieutenant Kauhaihao drew enemy fire on himself again and again so that his men could sight enemy gunners and bring them under suppressive fire. Lieutenant Kauhaihao then directed the withdrawal of his battered point element. Crawling over a hundred meters of fire-swept terrain, he dragged vital equipment to the rear and helped wounded Soldiers to a position of safety. While rejoining his men to the company’s main force, Lieutenant Kauhaihao sighted an enemy squad moving up on his tattered platoon. As he advanced to engage the approaching enemy, Lieutenant Kauhaihao was mortally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Kauhaihao’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1047 (May 4, 1970)
Home Town: Honaunau, Hawaii

*KENNEDY, ALTON R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alton R. Kennedy (US52659547), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Kennedy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as a medic with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division during a combat assault in the Highway 506 Valley. Maneuvering against an entrenched North Vietnamese Army force, his platoon and another company became pinned down by intense hostile fire. Private Kennedy quickly raced forward and began treating his stricken comrades. Dauntlessly exposing himself to the devastating fire, he was wounded in the leg as he aided a fellow Soldier. Unmindful of the pain, Private Kennedy crawled to the side of another man and bandaged his wounds. He then called for men to help in the evacuation and made several trips back through the hail of bullets to carry more injured Soldiers to safety. Oblivious to the extreme dangers, Private Kenned left his covered position to retrieve another casualty, who was lying within ten meters of an insurgent bunker. Inching his way through the rounds that were kicking up dirt all around him, he succeeded in dragging the man back to the company perimeter. Pausing only to retard his own bleeding, Private Kennedy ignored requests to await further treatment and courageously reentered the ravaged battlefield. Her crawled forward yet another time, but was fatally wounded a few meters from a hostile machine gun position. His unimpeachable valor and selfless concern for the welfare of others, inspired his entrapped comrades and saved the lives of others, inspired his entrapped comrades and saved the lives of many fellow Soldiers. Private First Class Kennedy’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1059 (March 11, 1967)

KERNS, RAYMOND A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond A. Kerns (W-3155916), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Warrant Officer Kerns distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1967 as a pilot on an armed reconnaissance mission in Binh Thuan Province. Mister Kerns was diverted from his mission to assist a platoon heavily engaged by a Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons and small arms. As he made a low-level pass over the battle area, his ship received intense fire from a treeline. Ignoring the vulnerability of his scout helicopter, he launched a devastating attack on one enemy position and suppressed its weapons with deadly accurate fire. As he hovered over the silenced position to assess the damage, his ship received heavy fire from two more emplacements. Disregarding his safety, he remained in position and executed a series of turns that enabled his gunner to engage and kill the attackers. The friendly infantry began an assault on the enemy and was brought under heavy fire. Mister Kerns again attacked the Viet Cong, forcing them to break cover and run in the face of the infantry’s pursuit. He inflicted heavy casualties to the insurgents as they tried to escape. Two fleeing enemy Soldiers took refuge in some brush and Mister Kerns hovered over their position until they surrendered to the friendly ground forces. His fearless actions in the heat of battle contributed greatly to the decisive defeat inflicted on the Viet Cong. Warrant Officer Kerns’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2016 (May 2, 1968)
CW4 (Ret) Kerns died on 1 August 2009 and is buried in Lillington, North Carolina.

*KIGER, DENNIS DELMAR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dennis Delmar Kiger (474-48-0700), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 8th Engineer Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Kiger distinguished himself while serving as a volunteer member of an infantry company during an assault of an enemy element entrenched around a large cache. As Sergeant Kiger and his comrades advanced toward the enemy emplacements, they came under an intense barrage of enemy fire. Nevertheless, the company continued to advance until the enemy fire wounded several of the friendly Soldiers. At this time, Sergeant Kiger sprang to his feet amid the hail of enemy bullets and assaulted the nearest enemy position. Although wounded as he advanced, he continued his assault until he eliminated the enemy position and four enemy Soldiers. He then placed intense rifle fire on the enemy from his exposed position until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Staff Sergeant Kiger’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4062 (March 31, 1970)
Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota

*KRUPINSKI, RAYMOND JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond John Krupinski (170-40-5758), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Krupinski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 April 1969 while serving as platoon leader of a patrol operating in Binh Long Province. As he was positioning his men in an ambush formation, an enemy force opened fire with automatic weapons and rockets. He immediately directed retaliatory fire and called the medics to administer aid to the wounded. As he and his machine gun crew were attempting to move in on a hostile emplacement, the assistant gunner was wounded as well as the medical aidman who tried to reach him. Lieutenant Krupinski quickly proceeded to remove the wounded gunner. As he was pulling the man to safety, he was wounded. Refusing medical treatment, he returned to the area to recover the medic. As he was heroically attempting to rescue the injured man, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Krupinski’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2527 (July 12, 1969)
Home Town: Erie, Pennsylvania

KYLES, BOBBY W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bobby W. Kyles (US54443505), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Kyles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1969 while serving as senior radio operator on a reconnaissance-in-force mission northeast of Bien Hoa. While traversing a woody knoll, his company encountered an attack from hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. When two men fell wounded, Specialist Kyles and his company commander rushed forward to place suppressive fire on the enemy, allowing the downed men to be moved back. Even as he returned fire, Specialist Kyles established communication to the command post for his company commander. During the next assault, which penetrated the communists’ position, the company commander was wounded, and Specialist Kyles braved a hail of bullets to assist in bandaging the injured officer. The company, moving under supporting artillery fire, assaulted the enemy a third time. Suddenly an aerial rocket struck an enemy rocket cache located directly in front of the company command group and the first platoon. In the resultant explosion, seventeen Soldiers were wounded, including the company commander, the forward artillery observer, and Specialist Kyles. Realizing that the commander was temporarily out of action, Specialist Kyles contacted the gun ships and adjusted their target zone further to the front. Disregarding his painful chest and abdominal wounds, he encouraged the company to press on, thereby enabling the wounded to be removed to safety. He then radioed the battalion command post requesting replacements for the company commander, the forward artillery observer and two radiomen. Turning his attention to tactics, he helped coordinate and stabilize the friendly ground actions and provided the command post with accurate and timely information. Only after the enemy began withdrawing and the level of fighting subsided did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment with the other wounded. Specialist Four Kyles’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1957 (June 4, 1969)

*LASATER, LUTHER MCKINDREE, III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Luther McKindree Lasater, III (462-74-7173), Captain (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the Troop F, 9th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Lasater distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 February 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 13 (May 3, 1973)
Born: February 16, 1947 at Fort Worth, Texas
Home Town: Garland, Texas

Synopsis:
“On the afternoon of 13 February 1972, Company ‘B’, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry, made contact with a force of undetermined size in a bunker complex, and requested that a Hunter-Killer team be sent to their assistance. The weather was clear and sunny and the terrain was thin, single canopy jungle with low, dense bamboo thickets and gently rolling hills. The enemy morale was high and they were protecting their positions by firing at all aircraft and personnel entering the area. When the Hunter-Killer team arrived on station, the mission commander coordinated with the ground unit and made rocket runs in his AH-1G to suppress the area. Then the OH-6A Scout aircraft, piloted by CPT Luther M. Lasater, entered the contact area at treetop level to mark the enemy positions for the AH-1G to destroy. CPT Lasater flew through the area several times, each time taking heavy small arms and machine gun fire, before he was satisfied that he could put out an accurate mark. He then put out a white phosphorous grenade to mark the enemy positions for the Cobra, which made rocket runs as CPT Lasater moved away. At this time, an aerial field artillery section arrived on station fully armed and CPT Lasater, despite the heavy volume of enemy ground to air fire, offered to re-mark the enemy positions so their rockets would be of the most benefit to the ground unit. CPT Lasater entered the area and immediately became the target of the enemy gunners, who were able to hit his aircraft, shooting out his main generator. CPT Lasater, however, was not satisfied with his mark and returned to put another grenade on the location. On this pass, CPT Lasater’s aircraft was critically hit by enemy fire and crashed between the enemy and friendly ground unit. SP4 Keith A. Delahoy, CPT Lasater’s gunner, was able to escape the aircraft and made an attempt to rescue CPT Lasater. At that time, however, the aircraft exploded, burning SP4 Delahoy painfully and killing CPT Lasater. Because CPT Lasater’s actions diverted enemy fire, the command and control element of the company in contact was able to disengage from an untenable location where it was pinned down by enemy fire. The company command element thus obtained a superior command and control position from which to successfully direct the remaining battle.

The facts contained in the proposed citation and this narrative have been substantiated by the statements of eyewitnesses.” Capt. Lasater’s Medal of Honor recommendation was downgraded to the Distinguished Service Cross. He also received a posthumous Bronze Star and Air Medal. He was 24 years old, married and is buried at Resland Cemetery, Richardson, Texas, Space 3, Lot 37, Block P, Field of Honor. Information obtained from http://www.tohonorourfallen.com/vietnam.htm

LEWIS, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Lewis (0-5337275), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Lewis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 and 4 February 1968 as an infantry platoon leader during the campaign to regain control of the city of Hue. During an engagement with strong forward elements of a North Vietnamese Army regiment, his battalion charged across an open area against well entrenched enemy forces concealed in the woodline on the far side. As Lieutenant Lewis’ company neared the woodline, a heavy volume of accurate small arms fire struck the unit and temporarily halted its advance. Lieutenant Lewis quickly organized a squad of volunteers to maneuver against the fortified emplacements. Moving from his covered position, he led the team across open ground. At a slight rise, he deployed his men as a fire support element and continued on alone to a point within hand grenade range of the insurgents’ bunkers. He then began to destroy the positions one by one with grenades and small arms fire. As each bunker was eliminated, the enemy desperately directed more and more fire at him, but he continued his mission until all the bunkers were destroyed. Lieutenant Lewis then began to supervise the medical evacuation of the wounded. As he did so, he observed the litter bearers come under heavy volume of fire. He secured all available smoke grenades and moved forward to provide covering smoke for the rescue teams. Early the next morning, the enemy regiment received reinforcements and attacked the friendly force’s perimeter. Lieutenant Lewis’ section received the brunt of the assault. Through his outstanding leadership his unit was able to repulse each enemy advance and inflict heavy casualties upon the attackers. The friendly forces then made a tactical withdrawal. Lieutenant Lewis once again organized and led a party of volunteers to retrieve wounded from the bullet-swept forward edge of the battle area. With the cover of a smoke screen he had established, he ran across open ground three times, carrying out wounded and equipment. Lieutenant Lewis’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3674 (July 31, 1968)

*LONCON, LARRY JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Joseph Loncon (438-80-6526), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Loncon distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Specialist Loncon was accompanying a friendly force up a steep, densely vegetated hill when the lead element came under an intense volley of fire from a well entrenched enemy force. Without hesitation, Specialist Loncon advanced through the hostile fire until he reached a seriously wounded Soldier in the lead element. While under enemy fire; he skillfully applied first aid to the Soldier’s wounds and assisted him to a rear position. The Specialist then returned to the forward area of contact to treat two comrades who had been seriously wounded. Although seriously wounded by enemy fire as he treated the two casualties, he continued to treat his comrades and assist them to safety until he collapsed. Specialist Four Loncon’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4063 (August 31, 1970)
Home Town: New Iberia, Louisiana

LOSE, CHARLES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles R. Lose, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 14 November and 15 November 1965 in Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Air Cavalry Division. Specialist Five Lose distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 and 15 November 1965. As a Medical Aidman, Specialist Lose was serving with the Second Platoon of Company B when the Platoon became pinned down by an intense assault from a battalion size Viet Cog force and then cut off from the remainder of the Company for a period of twenty-six hours. As the enemy’s deadly and heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire inflicted several casualties on the Platoon during the initial attack, Specialist Lose bravely moved through the hail of gun fire to care for the wounded. Although he was wounded in the foot by grenade fragments during one of his courageous moves to reach a fallen comrade, he continued to administer to the wounded by crawling from man to man dragging his aid kit with him. When his medical supplies became exhausted, he demonstrated rare ingenuity and determination by fashioning bandages from C-ration resources. He collected water from the canteens of the dead for distribution to the wounded. Again and again, he crawled across the open area and exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to give first aid to the wounded, often using his own body as a shield for the protection of his fellow Soldiers. On the following day when a relief force reached the beleaguered unit, he refused to be evacuated until all of the wounded were taken to safety. Specialist Lose’s conspicuous gallantry, his extraordinary heroism on the battlefield, and his deep concern for his fellow Soldiers are in the highest traditions of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 42 (October 4, 1966)

LUTCHENDORF, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. Lutchendorf (0-5238134), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Lutchendorf distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1967 as platoon leader of an airmobile cavalry company. His platoon air-assaulted an unsecured landing zone in the mountains north of Phan Thiet and immediately came under intense automatic weapons fire from eight well camouflaged and fortified bunkers. The bunkers were situated on two sides of the landing zone and the other two sides were covered with punji stakes to prevent escape and evasion. Lieutenant Lutchendorf directed his men to move to defilade position as he remained behind to direct air strikes, aerial rocket artillery, and gunship fire into the enemy positions. He repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly insurgent barrage to determine the effectiveness of air strikes, adjust them, and to hurl grenades at the enemy bunkers. Even though enemy mortar rounds began falling around his position. Lieutenant Lutchendorf remained exposed to the fusillade to fix the bunker positions with compass readings to allow more accurate air strikes. Napalm bombs and aerial rocket artillery were able to destroy several of the fortified bunkers due to this action. Although seriously wounded, Lieutenant Lutchendorf stubbornly refused to give up his command or accept medical aid for himself. Throughout the night, he retained control of his men and inspired them to bring constant pressure on the determined enemy. His outstanding leadership was decisive in repelling a superior enemy force and the safe evacuation of his troops. Lieutenant Lutchendorf’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1425 (March 30, 1968)

MACE, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James E. Mace (0-98342), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Mace distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 2 to 4 December 1968 while commanding his company on a search and clear mission near Dong Xoai. When his point element came under heavy fire, Captain Mace moved forward and directed his men in a flanking movement which forced the enemy to retreat from their bunkers. He then led his unit through the hostile emplacements to link with a sister company in a night defensive position. Braving intense enemy fire, he organized a rescue party and led it from the night location to rescue the crew of an ammunition re-supply helicopter shot down by the communists. On the next day, he led his unit in an attack against another bunker complex. After exposing himself to the vicious enemy fire to carry a wounded man to safety, Captain Mace stood up to spot the enemy gunners, personally killing two and wounding three of them. Finding that the foe was attempting to encircle his company, he ordered a withdrawal and remained behind to direct rocket artillery to within one hundred meters of his position. While returning to the same site from another direction the following day, the unit was hit by command detonated mines and heavy machine gun fire which caused several casualties. Captain Mace led his men on an assault of the enemy fortifications, killing one communist and rescuing two wounded comrades from under the hostile fusillade. As a result of this action, a major enemy supply complex was destroyed. Captain Mace’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 838 (March 9, 1969)

MANGLONA, MARTIN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Martin A. Manglona (RA50010158), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Manglona distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early hours of 23 February 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Tinh Bien Province. Staff Sergeant Manglona’s company’s night defensive position was attacked by a North Vietnamese Army company using mortars, rockets and hand grenades and, in the first minutes of the fighting, Sergeant Manglona, his platoon leader and the radio operator were wounded by an incoming mortar. Despite his painful injury, he evacuated his stricken comrades and quickly deployed his men to effectively engage the enemy. Braving the hostile fusillade, he resupplied his troops with ammunition, directed their fire, hurled grenades and helped evacuate other casualties. While helping to defend the most vulnerable section of the perimeter, he was blinded by fragments from an enemy rocket. Sergeant Manglona ordered his men to place him so that his weapon was aimed at the communists, and refused to be evacuated until the attack was repelled. Staff Sergeant Manglona’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1730 (May 14, 1969)

MARTIN, ROY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roy D. Martin (0-5307243), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Martin was serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On 21 May 1966, his unit was assigned the task of routing an unknown Viet Cong force out of a nearby valley. While moving up, Captain Martin’s unit came under intense automatic weapons and sniper fire from a well-dug-in reinforced Viet Cong battalion. As a counter movement, the friendly defenders launched a frontal assault but were beaten back by the insurgents. Realizing the necessity of a break in contact with the hostile forces prior to darkness, Captain Martin withdrew his troops and called for aerial rocket artillery, mortar, and artillery fire support. He then took his headquarters element and the second platoon and moved to within 30 meters of the Viet Cong’s line of defense. A machine gun opened fire on the advancing platoon and Captain Martin, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to the intense fire, shot the gunner, and threw a grenade into the emplacement killing the three remaining Viet Cong. Continuing another 25 meters, Captain Martin eliminated two more bunkers which allowed his unit to advance. Still moving up, he exposed himself three more times to kill snipers. Captain Martin’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 223 (September 12, 1966)

*MAYNARD, THOMAS HARRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Harry Maynard (RA19286737), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Maynard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1965 while serving as an ammunition bearer during a search and destroy operation in the vicinity of Plei Me, Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 1330 hours, Private Maynard’s unit came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from well camouflaged Viet Cong positions. The insurgents had excellent observation and fields of fire which made it difficult to advance and halted the friendly assault. During the course of action, ammunition was called for by the forward elements of the platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety while exposed to the intense hostile fire, Private Maynard and another Soldier advanced to approximately twenty meters toward the lead elements of the platoon, with the critically needed ammunition and both were immediately wounded. While attempting to locate the Viet Cong positions, a grenade had landed between Private Maynard and the other Soldier. Private Maynard, although wounded himself and with complete disregard for his personal safety, pushed his comrade aside and threw himself upon the grenade, smothering the blast with his body. His intentional and selfless act undoubtedly saved the life of his fellow Soldier and served as an inspiration to the other members of his unit. Private Maynard’s unimpeachable valor and extraordinary heroism in close combat against hostile forces were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 33 (July 26, 1967)
Home Town: El Monte, California

McCAFFREY, BARRY R.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Barry R. McCaffrey (OF-101587), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain McCaffrey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 March 1969 as company commander during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. When elements of one of his platoon came under intense fire from a well-fortified enemy bunker complex, Captain McCaffrey immediately moved forward to assault the hostile position in order to relieve pressure on the beleaguered squad. He quickly deployed his men for an attack and led the advance through the fusillade. When he had pinpointed the source of the greatest concentration of fire, he initiated a single-handed assault on the bunker. After several attempts, he finally succeeded in destroying the machine gun bunker and its occupants. Despite being wounded in the left arm, he continued to supervise the overrunning and destruction of the hostile bunker system. After organizing the evacuation of his casualties, he called in supporting fire on the enemy. Only after he was assured that all of the wounded had been cared for and after he had organized a defensive position, did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. Captain McCaffrey’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2905 (August 2, 1969)
Born: November 17, 1942 at Taunton, Massachusetts
Home Town: Andover, Massachusetts
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

*McCRARY, DOUGLAS MACARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Douglas MacArthur McCrary (0-5324222), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airborne). First Lieutenant McCrary distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 February 1967 while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry engaged with a well entrenched enemy force. When the two lead platoons came under intense insurgent fire, Lieutenant McCrary quickly directed a twelve man security team forward to outflank the hostile positions. However, as the team approached the objective, it was suddenly pinned down by devastating fire from concealed enemy bunkers. Realizing the urgency of the situation, Lieutenant McCrary started maneuvering the rest of the platoon toward the besieged force. After advancing to a position near the team, he called for his men to provide suppressive fire as he fearlessly crawled across the bullet-swept field alone. Upon reaching the stranded element, Lieutenant McCrary began to move among the endangered men, treating the wounded and shouting encouragement. Seeing one stricken man lying exposed across a dike, he tossed a smoke grenade to provide cover and then charged forward through a hail of insurgent bullets. But as he started to pull the man to safety, the smoke dissipated and Lieutenant McCrary was mortally wounded. His boundless courage and selfless sacrifice in trying to save a fellow Soldier will serve as a source of lasting inspiration to all those who knew him. First Lieutenant McCrary’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2165 (May 14, 1967)
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

McQUISTON, HUGH J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hugh J. McQuiston, Jr. (RA36969360), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant McQuiston distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 July 1967 while serving as platoon sergeant of an Airmobile platoon on a bunker destroying mission near Tuy An. While entering the village aboard tanks and bulldozers, the platoon was attacked by a well-entrenched enemy force firing automatic weapons and small arms. When the platoon leader was hit, Sergeant McQuiston immediately took command and directed his men into a defensive perimeter. Braving a hail of hostile fire, he dashed into the open numerous times to rescue wounded men from a nearby tank. He continuously exposed himself to the withering fire to rally his men and direct their fire on the Viet Cong positions. He then single-handedly attacked and destroyed an enemy trench with rifle fire and grenades killing eight insurgent Soldiers. Notified that reinforcements were on the way, Sergeant McQuiston once more fully exposed himself to organize a blocking force to prevent enemy escape. His calmness and decisive leadership prevented many friendly casualties and contributed greatly to the defeat of the hostile force. Platoon Sergeant McQuiston’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4677 (September 15, 1967)

*MEARA, WILLIAM DANIELS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Daniels Meara (0-3190077), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Meara distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 November 1968 while commanding his company on a reconnaissance-in-force-mission south of Landing Zone Billie. As his unit was returning to the landing zone, one platoon suddenly came under intense fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese’s Army force and was severed completely from the remainder of the company. Captain Meara immediately turned his lead elements around to go to the aid of the besieged platoon. Approaching the battle area, the relief column also came under heavy small arms fire from enemy bunkers to their front. Captain Meara deployed his troops and moved among their positions, directing their fire, shouting words of encouragement and checking for casualties. After he had prepared his company for an attack, he and his point man led an assault on the first bunker in their path. Firing their weapons and hurling grenades, they charged and destroyed the emplacement, killing its occupants. Despite the fierce hostile fire, the two men continued their furious onslaught until the point man was felled by sniper fire as they advanced on another fortification. Captain Meara instantly placed a heavy volley on the communists and attempted to reach his comrade. Braving the enemy barrage, he courageously persisted in his efforts until he was mortally wounded. Captain Meara’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the coast of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 384 (February 4, 1969)
Home Town: Mount Holly, New Jersey

*MOORE, CHARLES THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Thomas Moore (487561838), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 5 January 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On that date, when the First Platoon of Company D made contact with a determined enemy force located in a well-fortified bunker complex, a friendly Trooper to the front was severely wounded. Despite his own wrist wounds, Private Moore, medical aidman for the First Platoon, moved through the intense hail of enemy fire to treat and evacuate the wounded Soldier. Subsequently, a rocket impacted which strafed the area with shrapnel, wounding the First Platoon leader and further injuring Private Moore. Again with complete disregard for his own welfare, Private Moore moved to the aid of his platoon leader and evacuated the officer to safety. Then, noticing that his first patient had stopped breathing, Private Moore untiringly, and singularly performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until life and unassisted breathing were restored. As he was constructing a bamboo stretcher on which to carry this critically wounded Trooper, Private Moore was shot in the hip and rendered unconscious. Minutes later, he regained consciousness, and although his many wounds now completely incapacitated his movement and his position was exposed, he began shouting valuable instructions concerning the necessary and vital treatment for the wounded. Even when he knew that death was imminent, Private Moore unselfishly ignored his pain and continued to give valuable medical instructions. Private Moore succumbed to his wounds before he could be medically evacuated, but not before he had saved the lives of many of his comrades through his conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism. Private Moore’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)
Born: July 15, 1948 at Ottumwa, Iowa
Home Town: Memphis, Missouri

MOORE, HAROLD G., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold G. Moore, Jr. (0-27678), Colonel (Infantry), [then Lieutenant Colonel], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 14 through 16 November 1965, Colonel Moore, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), was participating with his unit in a vital search and destroy operation in the la Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. Upon entering the landing zone with the first rifle company, Colonel Moore personally commenced the fire-fight to gain control of the zone by placing accurate fire upon the Viet Cong from an exposed position in his hovering helicopter. Throughout the initial assault phase, Colonel Moore repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to insure the proper and expedient deployment of friendly troops. By his constant movement and repeated exposure to this insurgent fire, Colonel Moore, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, set the standard for his combat troops by a courageous display of “leadership by example” which characterized all his actions throughout the long and deadly battle. Inspired by his constant presence and active participation against the overwhelming insurgent hordes, the friendly forces solidified their perimeter defenses and repulsed numerous Viet Cong assaults. On 15 November 1965, the embattled battalion was again attacked by a three-pronged insurgent assault aimed at surrounding and destroying the friendly forces in one great advance. With great skill and foresight, Colonel Moore moved from position to position, directing accurate fire and giving moral support to the defending forces. By his successful predictions of insurgent attack plans, he was able to thwart all their efforts by directing barrages of small arms, mortar, and artillery fire in conjunction with devastating air strikes against Viet Cong positions and attack zones. As the grueling battle continued into the third day, another large Viet Cong strike was repulsed through Colonel Moore’s ability to shift men and firepower at a moment’s notice against the savage, last-ditch efforts of the insurgents to break through the friendly positions. Colonel Moore’s battalion, inspired by his superb leadership, combat participation, and moral support, finally decimate the well-trained and numerically superior Viet Cong force so decidedly that they withdrew in defeat, leaving over 800 of their dead on the battlefield, and resulting in a great victory for the 1st Battalion. Colonel Moore’s extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 126 (June 1, 1966)

MORDUE, NORMAN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norman A. Mordue (OF-108795), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Mordue distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 May 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an Airmobile platoon on a search and clear operation in the village of An Qui. when another platoon was pinned down by heavy machine gun and grenade fire from a numerically superior and well entrenched insurgent force, Lieutenant Mordue immediately led his platoon on a fierce attack to relieve the pressure on the engaged unit. Seeing two of his men wounded and pinned down, he grabbed a machine gun and braved withering enemy fire to rescue them. He then moved to the front of his platoon, completely ignoring his own safety, and personally destroyed two enemy bunkers and killed five hostile Soldiers in the ensuing offensive. Severely wounded and unable to walk, Lieutenant Mordue refused medical aid and directed the withdrawal of his men as deadly artillery strikes were called in on the Viet Cong positions. His bravery and gallant leadership contributed greatly to the defeat of the enemy. First Lieutenant Mordue extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4667 (September 14, 1967)

*NEELY, DAN LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dan Lee Neely (RA12937819), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Neely distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 March 1968 as radio-telephone operator of an airmobile infantry company on a search and destroy mission northwest of Hue. One of the company’s platoons made contact with an estimated company of North Vietnamese Army regulars and immediately suffered several casualties. A reinforcement platoon moved up to assist and became pinned down behind a small bush line. Several medics attempted to crawl forward to give aid to the wounded who were lying in exposed positions, and they were hit by the enemy fire as they advanced. Private Neely began to move from position to position, exposing himself to the fusillade to collect hand grenades. Discarding his equipment and carrying only grenades and medical bandages, he then crawled forward toward the casualties. He maneuvered to within a few meters of a Viet Cong bunker and threw grenades at it in an attempt to silence its weapons. The attempt failed and he was driven back by a fierce enemy barrage. While the reinforcement platoon concentrated covering fire on the enemy position, Private Neely again moved forward, this time succeeding in reaching one of the wounded medics. After applying first aid to the man, he dragged him back to the relative safety of the friendly force’s p perimeter. Private Neely secured a further supply of grenades and attempted to return to the remaining wounded. While crawling forward in the face of withering fire, throwing hand grenades at the enemy, he was mortally wounded. Private Neely’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3338 (July 15, 1968)
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama

NELSON, CHARLES EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles Edward Nelson (RA55380871), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 10 January 1969 while serving as a platoon leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1969 as a platoon leader in Don Luan Province during a mission to destroy a bridge which was a known enemy infiltration route. Sergeant Nelson was under the bridge preparing to demolish it when his company was suddenly subjected to intense automatic weapons fire from bunkers across the river. Seeing that the company commander was pinned down, he began to place covering fire, killing one North Vietnamese Soldier, and remained in his exposed position until the commander had reached safety. As he was leading a withdrawal so that air strikes could be conducted, his platoon came under a heavy barrage from another group of bunkers. After positioning his men, he advanced alone toward the bunker, but was wounded in the chest by fire from a previously undetected fortification. Disregarding his painful injury, he crawled to within one meter of the bunker and hurled a grenade inside, killing the two occupants and relieving the pressure on his platoon. His men then reorganized and, with the help of another platoon, routed the communists. Sergeant First Class Nelson’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1587 (May 3, 1969)

*NELSON, WILLIAM DEWITT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William DeWitt Nelson (US56711052), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 as a medic on a search and clear operations near Landing Zone Billie. His company made contact with a large well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force and during the initial barrage, was pinned down by the intense enemy fire and sustained heavy casualties. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Nelson ran across the open terrain to his injured comrades, treated their wounds, and carried them to an ambulance helicopter. Returning to the battle, he began to lay down an accurate volley of fire on the Communists’ positions. During a brief lull in the fighting, he secured vital medical supplies and as the enemy renewed their attack, again moved unhesitatingly through the bullet-riddled area in response to a call for a medic. Seeing the company commander lying near a hostile bunker, Specialist Nelson placed himself between the fortification and the officer. Although wounded severely in the leg, he rapidly discharged an intense volume of fire as a fellow medic feverishly treated the injured commander. While Specialist Nelson was carrying the officer to the rear, a rocket landed inches from him, instantly taking his life. Specialist Four Nelson’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 426 (February 7, 1969)
Home Town: Long Beach, California

O’CONNOR, OSCAR L.
Citation:
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Captain (Infantry) Oscar Lee O’Connor (ASN: 0-5322152), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain O’Connor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 November 1967. On that date, Captain O’Connor was leading two platoons on a search and destroy mission near Phan Thiet, Republic of Vietnam, when an abandoned Viet Cong camp site and bunker complex was found. In searching the area, a rice bowl was turned over exposing a hand grenade booby trap. Immediately Captain O’Connor yelled, “Grenade.” Everyone rushed to cover and the grenade exploded harmlessly. Captain O’Connor ordered everyone out of the area. He left two engineers to destroy the first bunker and proceeded through very thick undergrowth to the next bunker. While moving through the brush, the pointman tripped a tripwire releasing a Viet Cong hand grenade wedged in the fork of a bush. The grenade fell to the ground landing in the midst of the element. Realizing that the grenade could destroy all of the men in his element, Captain O’Connor threw his body onto the grenade to smother the blast and yelled, “Grenade.” Still expecting the grenade to explode at any instant, he ordered everyone out of the area. Captain O’Connor reached under his body, grasped the grenade and threw it into a bunker opening about five feet away. The grenade exploded the instant it entered the bunker, with the force of the explosion inflicting minor concussion and fragment wounds in the leg of Captain O’Connor. Captain O’Connor’s extraordinary heroism and willing self-sacrifice are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 13 (March 6, 1969)

*O’KUSKY, HENRY JOSEPH, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Joseph O’Kusky, Jr. (0-5346474), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Second Lieutenant O’Kusky distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 July 1968 while serving as a platoon leader during an assault on a large North Vietnamese Army bunker and tunnel complex located on a hill in triple canopy jungle, southwest of Camp Evans. He and a squad leader fought their way to within a short distance of the nearest bunker. Lieutenant O’Kusky then crawled into the open and threw a hand grenade into the fortification, silencing its occupants. While advancing alone towards the next hostile position he was wounded in the thigh by enemy fire. Ignoring the pain of his injury and the communists’ fusillade, he continued to close on the emplacement and threw a grenade which partially destroyed it. As Lieutenant O’Kusky released the grenade, he was fatally wounded by a burst of automatic weapon fire from a third North Vietnamese fortification. Second Lieutenant O’Kusky’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5163 (November 6, 1968)
Home Town: Craddockville, Virginia

*OQUENDO, FRUTO JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fruto James Oquendo (124-40-0554), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Oquendo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 May 1969 while serving as a machine gunner at a fire support base in Tay Ninh Province. In the early morning hours, the base began to receive heavy rocket and mortar fire followed by a ground assault. When a North Vietnamese regiment armed with machine guns and satchel charges rushed the perimeter, Specialist Oquendo detonated claymore mines and placed rifle fire into their advancing ranks. As the enemy attempted to blast openings in the wire barrier, he valiantly attempted to abort their efforts. Soon, however, the enemy forces penetrated the berm in several spots and began throwing grenades and small arms fire at Specialist Oquendo’s position. He and several others in his bunker were wounded, but he refused to be evacuated. When he depleted his ammunition, he grabbed one of his wounded comrade’s weapons and continued firing. In a determined bid to capture his bunker, the communists stormed his position. During the hand to hand struggle, he was mortally wounded while defending his area. Specialist Oquendo’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2673 (July 17, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

ORSINI, DONALD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald A. Orsini (0-5315538), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Orsini distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 December 1967 as commander of an infantry company conducting a search and destroy mission. His unit was moving toward a small village when it was subjected to intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from a well entrenched and numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Captain Orsini quickly moved forward to the point of heaviest contact and deployed his troops in defensive positions. When he was informed that the men of the company’s right flank security element were wounded and unable to take cover, he fearlessly raced across one hundred meters of bullet-swept terrain to rescue the casualties. He reached them only to find that they had been killed. Returning to his command post, Captain Orsini learned that three Soldiers of the point element were pinned down fifty meters to the front by the hostile fusillade. Braving a withering hail of enemy fire, he led two men to assist the beleaguered troops. One volunteer was killed and the other wounded by a North Vietnamese sniper, and Captain Orsini was forced to withdraw, carrying his wounded comrade back to the company’ s defensive perimeter. He then called for armored personnel carriers to cover the withdrawal of the point men. When they arrived, he resumed his rescue efforts under their heavy suppressive fire. Although seriously wounded by the explosion of an enemy recoilless rifle round, Captain Orsini refused medical treatment and guided the beleaguered troops to safety. Captain Orsini’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2019 (May 2, 1968)
Home Town: Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

ORTIZ, RAYMOND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond Ortiz (RA54223477), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 3 and 4 November 1965, Specialist Ortiz was serving as a medical corpsman accompanying the 3d platoon of Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division on a night air assault mission of a Viet Cong held zone. At approximately 2330 hours, 3 November 1965, after landing and leaving his troop carrying helicopter, Specialist Ortiz was wounded in his left arm which rendered it useless. Disregarding and refusing treatment of his painful wound, he remained with the 3d platoon during its assault on the hostile positions. As the platoon advanced to within thirty meters of the insurgent position, he continually refused to be evacuated and personally gave aid and evacuated six of his wounded comrades. Notwithstanding the murderous hail of hostile fire, he rushed to the aid of his platoon leader, who had been wounded and was lying in the line of the hostile barrage. Moving forward in this attempt Specialist Ortiz was again wounded in the chest and knocked to the ground. Although in great pain from this wound he got to his feet, continued in the valorous attempt to aid his wounded superior, and was again wounded in the chest by small arms fire. When he was picked up for evacuation he refused aid until the rest of the wounded had been evacuated. His gallantry under fire saved the lives of several of his comrades and greatly inspired the members of the platoon. Specialist Ortiz’s extraordinary heroism and compassion for his fellow man were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 44 (February 28, 1966)

*PAGAN-LOZADA, WILFREDO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Wilfredo Pagan-Lozada (RA12639932), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Pagan-Lozada distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1967 while serving as a platoon sergeant with elements of the 5th Cavalry during a combat reconnaissance mission near Phu Loc. As his company maneuvered across open rice paddies, it suddenly received intense hostile fire from a village 100 meters to its front. Seeing his platoon leader wounded and lying exposed to enemy fire, Sergeant Pagan-Lozada dauntlessly left his covered position and dashed forward firing his weapon. When his rifle jammed, he grabbed another and fearlessly continued across the bullet swept sandbar. Unmindful of the grave dangers, Sergeant Pagan-Lozada charged on through a hail of bullets to the fallen Soldier. He then fired an entire magazine into the hostile emplacements less than twenty- five meters away, as he shielded his stricken leader with his own body. When Sergeant Pagan-Lozada tried to pull the officer to safety, he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. His unimpeachable valor and selfless sacrifice, while trying to save a fellow Soldier, will serve as a source of lasting inspiration to all those who knew him. Sergeant First Class Pagan-Lozada’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3405 (July 6, 1967)
Home Town: New York, New York

*PEDA, ROBERT CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Charles Peda (0-5330079), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Peda distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 April 1968 as wingman of an aero-scout fire team that was engaged in reconnaissance of an area near Long Vinh known to contain many enemy positions. Lieutenant Peda located several of the insurgent emplacements and unhesitantly attacked them while being subjected to intense hostile fire. During the battle, Lieutenant Peda’s helicopter was hit by automatic weapons fire, causing it to burst into flames and crash. He was thrown out of the aircraft as it hit the ground. Though badly wounded, he crawled back to the blazing wreckage to rescue his observer who was trapped inside it. Prior to reaching the aircraft, it exploded and threw Lieutenant Peda through the air, mortally wounding him. His courageous actions and determined efforts to save a fellow Soldier’s life were an inspiration to other aviators and troops in the area. First Lieutenant Peda’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3116 (June 29, 1968)
Home Town: Kingston, New York

PHIFER, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Phifer (US52757329), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Phifer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1968 during an attack against North Vietnamese regulars who were blocking his unit’s entry into the city of Hue. His element came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from the well entrenched enemy. When supporting aerial rocket artillery and gunships failed to silence the communist positions, Specialist Phifer began a one-man assault on the nearest bunker. Arming himself with several hand grenades, he crawled seventy-five meters through intense hostile fire to the base of the fortification. Exposing himself to the adjacent North Vietnamese positions, he twice crawled on top of the bunker to drop grenades inside, but the emplacement was not silenced. Specialist Phifer then climbed on the bunker a third time, and remained on top of it to shoot his pistol into the entrance after tossing another grenade inside. At the same time the occupants attempted to throw a grenade at him, but they were unable to release their grenade or dispose of his because of his pistol fire. Both grenades exploded within the bunker, killing the four North Vietnamese Soldiers inside and wounding Specialist Phifer in the arm. Specialist Four Phifer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5166 (November 6, 1968)

*PICKARD, ALFRED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred Pickard (450-84-0231), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Pickard distinguished himself while serving as a machine gunner with a reconnaissance patrol during operations in Phuoc Long Province. The squad-size patrol walked into an enemy bunker complex and was caught in a crossfire of rocket and machine gun fire. Five members of the patrol fell wounded in the initial barrage of enemy fire. Although twice wounded in the first hostile fusillade, Private Pickard unhesitatingly took command of the trapped patrol. He secured an M-60 machine gun and placed suppressive fire on the enemy fortifications while the rest of the patrol began pulling back to positions of cover. While thus covering the withdrawal of his comrades, Private Pickard was again hit by a burst of enemy fire and his machine gun rendered inoperative. Despite the heavy volume of fire now focused on him, Private Pickard held his position and continued covering the withdrawal of his comrades with M-16 rifle fire. It was then that he was again hit and mortally wounded by enemy fire. Private First Class Pickard’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1044 (May 4, 1970)
Home Town: Houston, Texas

PIPER, JOHN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John D. Piper (0-5418909), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 19th Field Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Piper distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1966 while serving as executive officer of an artillery battery during a massive Viet Cong attack in Binh Dinh Province. The two insurgent battalions began their attack with a mortar, recoilless rifle, and machine gun barrage which swept the artillery battery. Although barefoot, Lieutenant Piper seized a grenade launcher and raced to a howitzer position, suffering a serious knee wound as he ran. Exposing himself against a backdrop of burning ammunition to attract hostile fire away from the howitzers, he fearlessly engaged the waves of assaulting Viet Cong. When he learned that two guns on the far side of the battery had been overrun, he began crawling up to a vantage point to check the positions, ran into two insurgents, and killed them with his weapon. When the crew of his howitzer was forced to withdraw to another position to regroup, Lieutenant Piper personally covered their movement with intense fire. When he saw that the men at the rear position were unable to fire their artillery because of intense fire by hostile groups a short distance in front of the gun, Lieutenant Piper requested permission to fire anti-personnel rounds, warned the defenders in the camp to take secure cover, then personally fired two rounds which struck terror into the Viet Cong and routed them from their attacking positions. Moments later, while checking wounded in the battery, he came upon an insurgent with explosives at a howitzer and killed him with his pistol. First Lieutenant Piper’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2377 (May 25, 1967)

*POLUSNEY, JAMES FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Francis Polusney (171-36-0223), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Five Polusney distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman with an infantry unit of the 1st Cavalry Division during a reconnaissance operation in Tay Ninh Province. His company was moving over flat terrain densely wooded with bamboo when the forward platoon was engaged by an estimated platoon of North Vietnamese regulars firing from trees and heavily fortified bunkers. In the initial concentration of command detonated mines and automatic weapons fire, the lead platoon of the reconnaissance force sustained numerous casualties. Although seriously wounded himself, Specialist Polusney dragged himself forward to where several comrades lay critically wounded and moved from man to man administering first aid under constant and heavy enemy fire. After saving the life of one Soldier by stopping the bleeding of his severe abdominal wound and bandaging it, Specialist Polusney began crawling to another Soldier who lay wounded in a small clearing. Before he reached the man, however, Specialist Polusney was hit by sniper fire from the front and left flank. Specialist Polusney nevertheless struggled on and reached his wounded comrade. While administering aid to the wounded Soldier, Specialist Polusney succumbed to his own wounds. Specialist Five Polusney’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 769 (March 28, 1970)
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

*POOLE, THOMAS DEWITT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Dewitt Poole (US67109268), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Poole distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 February 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy operation in Quan Huong Tra Province. His company was moving toward a treeline on the far side of a rice paddy when it was subjected to heavy mortar, recoilless rifle and small arms fire from a North Vietnamese Army force occupying entrenched and fortified positions in the woods. Private Poole’s platoon was temporarily pinned down behind some mounds of earth, but soon began an assault on the enemy. Braving a hail of bullets and shrapnel. Private Poole charged across one hundred meters of open rice paddy and engaged the North Vietnamese at close range. Moving directly into the treeline, he personally assaulted an enemy bunker in his path, killing its three occupants with rifle fire. The savage fusillade delivered by other hostile bunker increased in intensity, and his platoon was ordered to withdraw and regroup. As Private Poole drew back across the rice paddy, he noticed a wounded platoon member lying exposed to the enemy weapons. Completely disregarding his safety, he moved to assist the fallen Soldier. He was mortally wounded while attempting to rescue his comrade. Private First Class Poole’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1569 (April 8, 1968)
Home Town: West Blocton, Alabama

POUTRAIN, JEAN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jean D. Poutrain (RA12737992), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Poutrain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1967 while serving as a member of an infantry company during a search and destroy mission near Phu Loc. As his company approached to within 100 meters of a village, it was hit and pinned down by intense machine gun fire. Private Poutrain was assigned to a squad that assaulted the Viet Cong weapon emplacements through a rice paddy. When he saw a fellow squad member fall in an area exposed to the insurgent gunners, Private Poutrain unhesitatingly ran through the hostile barrage to bring his comrade back to a covered position. He treated the wounded man, then ran to another squad to administer first aid to other casualties. When the order was given to withdraw so that an air strike could be made on the village, Private Poutrain carried his wounded platoon leader across the rice paddy, protecting him with his own body. Reaching cover with his leader, he once again ignored his own safety to retrieve another casualty from a position exposed to the Viet Cong gunners. He was hit in the face by shrapnel while treating the casualties, but refused to be evacuated and remained with his platoon until the next day. Private First Class Poutrain’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2709 (June 7, 1967)

*QUINN, RICHARD FLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Floyd Quinn (196-40-9443), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Quinn distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman during ground combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Specialist Quinn’s company had just departed its night defensive position and was advancing down a narrow jungle trail when the allied lead element contacted an enemy force of unknown size. several allied casualties were sustained in the initial fighting and Specialist Quinn immediately moved forward to treat the casualties. Ignoring the intense enemy fire that swept the area, he moved from one position to another to treat the wounded allies and assist them to positions of relative safety. When a series of incoming enemy rockets exploded to Specialist Quinn’s front, he immediately went to the aid of two seriously wounded Soldiers. Although exposed in a forward position, the specialist skillfully administered aid to his comrades. As he prepared to evacuate them to rear positions, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fire. Specialist Four Quinn’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4973 (October 29, 1970)
Home Town: Woodstock, New York

*RAMIREZ, LORENZO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lorenzo Ramirez, Jr. (US56714304), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. Private First Class Ramirez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 June 1968 as an assistant machine gunner during a combat mission near the Village of Binh An. As his company advanced toward well-entrenched North Vietnamese positions, it was hit by intense small arms fire and hand grenades. Suddenly a grenade landed a few feet away from Private Ramirez and two of his comrades. Disregarding his safety, he jumped up from his position beside the machine gun and knocked down a rifleman to his left. He then sprang to the right to push the machine gunner away, shielding the man with his body when the grenade detonated. Private Ramirez was mortally wounded by the blast. Private First Class Ramirez’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5359 (November 19, 1968)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*REYES, TOMAS GARCIA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Tomas Garcia Reyes (RA10106244), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Reyes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 November 1967 while serving as a squad leader of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission near An Tay. The company had moved to a small area of high ground, and Sergeant Reyes’ platoon was directed to cross an open rice paddy and secure the hedgerow on the far side. As his squad reached a position ten feet from the hedgerow, intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire erupted from well-concealed bunkers to the front and flanks. Sergeant Reyes immediately directed his troops to return fire on the hostile forces. Moving from position to position, he fired his weapon and threw grenades at the enemy. He then crawled forward through the withering fusillade to within two feet of a bunker in the hedgerow, fired his weapon on full automatic with one hand and with the other hurled several hand grenades into the position, destroying it and its occupants. When Sergeant Reyes received the order to break contact and allow supporting fire to be placed on the well-entrenched enemy, he remained exposed to a savage hail of bullets and fought a delaying action as his men withdrew. One of his squad members was wounded, and he gallantly returned to the bullet-swept rice paddy to rescue his comrade. While others followed him out to recover the casualty, Sergeant Reyes charged forward alone through a curtain of hostile fire. Hurling grenades and firing his weapon, he destroyed a second enemy emplacement. He was mortally wounded while courageously placing the welfare of his fellow Soldiers above his own. Staff Sergeant Reyes’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1150 (March 16, 1968)
Born: December 29, 1935 at Santa Cruz, Guam
Home Town: Agana, Guam

RIDER, ARCHIE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Archie A. Rider (0-77650), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major Rider distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 December 1967 as a troop commander near Duc Pho. Major Rider was directing aerial reconnaissance and insertion of his infantry platoon when contact was made with a large enemy force. Although seriously wounded in the initial exchange of fire, he refused to depart the area and had his aircraft deliver suppressive fire on the aggressors which enabled his infantrymen to reach cover. Although he was a vulnerable target for the enemy automatic weapons fire, he maneuvered his ship into point-blank range and attacked two hostile positions, killing several communists and disorganizing the others. After his men had completed the destruction of the two strongholds, Major Rider led the assault on the main enemy force. Despite his injuries, he skillfully coordinated with a support unit which was mounting an airmobile assault, called in artillery and air strikes and directed the movements of his troop. Once arrangements had been made for extraction of his unit, he allowed himself to be evacuated, passing out from loss of blood on the way to the aid station. Major Rider’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 727 (March 1, 1969)

RILEY, RONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald J. Riley (OF-104978), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Riley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 and 17 February 1967 while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division on a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. After conducting a sweep along the Song Tam Quan River, the platoon set up defensive positions for the night. At approximately 2130 hours, the perimeter received an intense mortar, grenade and automatic weapons attack from a large North Vietnamese Army force, which wounded several men at the outset. Seeing his radio operator hit and lying helpless in an open area, Lieutenant Riley fearlessly rushed to him and carried the stricken Soldier through a hail of bullets to cover. He then began moving around the ravaged perimeter redeploying his men, assisting the wounded and shouting encouragement. As the insurgent attack intensified, Lieutenant Riley repeatedly exposed himself to call in artillery and air strikes that forced the North Vietnamese to break contact and flee. When evacuation aircraft arrived, he directed the extraction of the casualties and kept his men alert during the remainder of the night for a possible counterattack. As the platoon prepared to move out the next morning, it received harassing sniper fire. Quickly maneuvering his men, Lieutenant Riley succeeded in trapping the enemy Soldiers on a small island. Armed only with a pistol, he gallantly entered the river alone to probe the bank for a cave and killed one sniper who suddenly lunged at him. Lieutenant Riley and a machine gunner then aggressively engaged and killed five other insurgents in a brief fight. His unimpeachable valor and assuring composure throughout the battle enabled his platoon to inflict heavy casualties upon a numerically superior hostile force without sustaining any fatalities. First Lieutenant Riley’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2660 (June 6, 1967)

RING, GEORGE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George M. Ring (0-5337793), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Ring distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 June 1968 as an infantry platoon leader during a mission in the Que Son Valley. A sister unit became encircled by a large enemy force, and Lieutenant Ring repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire as he led his men through enemy lines to reach and relieve the pressure on the embattled company. As the trapped company broke out of the encirclement, Lieutenant Ring remained behind to organize and evacuate the wounded. The enemy closed the breach in their envelopment, leaving him and an element of fifty men completely surrounded. After making several attempts to break through the enemy lines, the small detachment formed a defensive perimeter. Lieutenant Ring then called in and adjusted a concentrated ring of artillery fire around the position. The North Vietnamese Army troops repeatedly assaulted the defenders, attempting to overrun their position. Each attack was successfully repulsed as Lieutenant Ring skillfully coordinated and adjusted artillery barrages and the small arms and automatic weapons fire of his men on the assaulting troops. During one attack a group of enemy Soldiers made their way to within three meters of where the elements wounded were lying. Lieutenant Ring immediately charged the intruders and killed them with rifle fire. Second Lieutenant Ring’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3990 (August 17, 1968)

ROCK, PAUL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul J. Rock (US56909293), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Rock distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1967 as grenadier of a seven-man killer team on a combat mission near My Binh. The team had left its company perimeter late at night and was moving toward a small village when Specialist Rock heard the handle of a grenade pop. Realizing that he and his fellow Soldiers were walking into an ambush, he immediately turned and fired on the North Vietnamese Soldier holding the grenade, thus setting off the ambush before the patrol had entered its killing zone. The enemy grenade exploded and severely wounded Specialist Rock and several comrades. Ignoring his painful wounds, he got to his feet and dauntlessly charged the enemy positions through a curtain of hostile fire. Although wounded four more times by savage automatic weapons fire, he pressed his personal assault, killing one North Vietnamese Soldier and wounding several others with fierce rifle fire. Specialist Rock continued to expose himself to a relentless hail of bullets as he rendered first aid to a wounded team member and then gallantly remained behind to cover the team’s withdrawal. His fearless and determined actions in close combat saved the lives of all the patrol members. Specialist Four Rock’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1398 (March 28, 1968)

*ROSE, ONSBY RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Onsby Ray Rose (RA15697809), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Rose distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1966 while serving as radio-telephone operator for a company involved in providing security for a helicopter landing zone deep in hostile territory. Early in the evening, his company was attacked by a large enemy force using automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenades. As the fierce fighting increased, a machine gunner was wounded, weakening defenses in a critical position. Specialist Rose, without regard for his own safety, grabbed a machine gun and braved the withering fire to take his place on the line. His heavy and accurate fire on the enemy caused many casualties and forced the insurgents to retreat. As the firing subsided, an enemy hand grenade landed in his position. Seeing that he could not throw it away before exploding, Specialist Rose bravely threw himself on the grenade to save his assistant gunner. His immeasurably courageous action to save his comrade resulted in the loss of his life. Specialist Four Rose’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4428 (August 30, 1967)
Home Town: Clinchco, Virginia

ROSS, EDGAR A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edgar A. Ross, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Ross distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 March 1969 while leading a platoon on a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province. As the platoon members moved across an open field, they were ambushed and pinned down by a North Vietnamese force. Many casualties were immediately inflicted by the rain of grenades hurled at the platoon. Sergeant Ross, remaining calm, directed the foremost fire team to the assistance of the rear element who were receiving the brunt of the attack. Grabbing a machine gun, Sergeant Ross ran forward to spray suppressive fire on the assaulting communists in order to gain fire superiority. Becoming the main target of fire, he soon was wounded by the enemy. Observing a casualty trapped close to the enemy position, he managed to drag the man back to the remaining members of the platoon despite his own wounds. When reinforcements arrived, he was so weak due to the loss of blood, that he was unable to assist his men in their evacuation. Platoon Sergeant Ross’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3045 (August 11, 1969)

ROWLAND, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Rowland, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Second Lieutenant Rowland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 June 1970 while serving as platoon leader during combat operations in Cambodia. On this date, Lieutenant Rowland’s company was engaged by a large, well concealed enemy force firing small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket grenade launchers. Reacting immediately to the intense hostile fire, the lieutenant maneuvered among his men to direct their suppressive fire and locate them in strategic defensive positions. When the allies ran perilously low on ammunition, Lieutenant Rowland utilized a bomb crater as a drop zone and directed a helicopter re-supply operation. Although wounded by enemy fire, Lieutenant Rowland continued to distribute the ammunition to his men. Exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he lieutenant, on two separate occasions, charged forward through the fusillade to shield a medic and a wounded Soldier with his body. After securing a landing zone, he supervised the helicopter evacuation of his wounded men amid a hail of enemy fire. Then, refusing to allow his own wounds to be treated, he remained with his men throughout the night to direct their defenses against the determined enemy force. Second Lieutenant Rowland’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5218 (December 4, 1970)

SAVAGE, CLYDE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clyde E. Savage (RA14746198), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Savage was serving as squad leader in the 2d Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), on 14 November 1965, when it was attacked by a hostile force which consisted of approximately two companies. As an offensive measure, Sergeant Savage led his squad and attacked one of the hostile squads. During the attack, the bulk of the hostile force hit them. He immediately pulled his men in tight and succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties on the insurgent force. The rest of the platoon was also under intense fire and had to take a defensive position on a nearby knoll. During the fierce battle that followed, Sergeant Savage saved the lives of three comrades who had been wounded by killing three insurgents who had maneuvered to within ten meters of their position. The platoon leader, platoon sergeant, and weapon’s squad leader were mortally wounded, at which time Sergeant Savage assumed command. With most of the men either dead or wounded and being completely surrounded, the platoon continued holding off the insurgents for twenty-six hours. Sergeant Savage courageously called in supporting artillery fire to within fifty meters of their positions during the night. The following morning he shot over thirty of the insurgents during the bitter fight. His leadership during the battle influenced his men to hold out until reinforcements relieved them. Sergeant Savage’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 195 (February 1966)

SCHLOTTMAN, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Schlottman (0-5419228), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Schlottman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 October 1966 while serving as aerial artillery observer during a search and destroy mission near Ngot Bay. As his helicopter surveyed a hostile position, Lieutenant Schlottman spotted an insurgent running from the area, landed, and captured the man. Later, an infantry platoon made contact with insurgents in a nearby village. He directed the pilot to hover at 20 feet over the enemy and, despite a constant hail of hostile machine gun fire, he kept the Viet Cong under grenade and rifle fire for one hour. As a Viet Cong rifleman fired directly at his door gunner, Lieutenant Schlottman stepped into the line of fire and killed the insurgent with a single shot. When his helicopter landed to pick up a seriously wounded medic, Lieutenant Schlottman fearlessly jumped from the helicopter and charged a machine gun position. Using only his pistol, he was able to silence one weapon. Hostile fire so damaged the aircraft as it took off, that the pilot could fly it only 150 meters. Determined to continue the destruction of the enemy, Lieutenant Schlottman ran from the helicopter onto the battlefield with a radio and guided artillery strikes on the Viet Cong positions. First Lieutenant Schlottman’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2379 (May 25, 1967)

SCOTT, JAMES ARTHUR
Citation: Not Available (Awarded in 1996)

*SEE, OTTO WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Otto William See (RA13704655), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class See distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 March 1968 while serving as the observer on the lead ship of an aero-scout team reconnoitering an area in Quang Tri Province suspected to contain an enemy regimental headquarters. After locating the communists’ barracks, the team called in armed helicopters which fired rockets into the buildings. As the scout ships returned to the area to assess the damage, they and the troop commander’s helicopter came under intense automatic weapons fire. The troop commander and his pilot were wounded, and their craft crashed. Sergeant See immediately volunteered to attempt a rescue. Because his helicopter was unable to land near the crash site, he jumped from its skid as it hovered over the wreckage. The downed craft had begun to burn, and its still running engine was spewing fuel on the spreading flames. Sergeant See climbed inside the ship and pulled the wounded out one at a time. As he started to carry the casualties up a ravine for extraction by a waiting aircraft, a North Vietnamese company began to advance on his position to cut off his maneuver. Armed only with a pistol, he returned their fire while continuing to assist the injured up the hill. Upon reaching the landing zone, he put the casualties safely aboard the ship and remained behind with some of its crew members, fighting off the aggressors until another rescue helicopter arrived. Platoon Sergeant See’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5200 (November 8, 1968)
Home Town: Summersville, West Virginia
SFC Otto W. See was killed in action on 7 April 1968 when his aircraft was hit by hostile small arms fire and automatic weapons fire, crashed and burned.

SELLERS, RICHARD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard D. Sellers, Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop E, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Warrant Officer W1 Sellers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 January 1971 while piloting a helicopter during rescue operations near Lai Khe. Learning that an American helicopter had been shot down and its survivors were in close proximity of enemy troops, Warrant Officer Sellers volunteered to attempt a rescue and flew to the site of the wreckage. As he approached the location of the downed aircraft, his helicopter became the target of intense enemy ground fire. Unable to land, Mister Sellers had to hover his rescue airship while one of the wounded Soldiers was lifted aboard. Suddenly, a barrage of automatic weapons fire sprayed upon his helicopter, necessitating an evasive departure in order for a helicopter gunship to saturate the area with suppressive fire. Although his helicopter sustained battle damage, the defiant Mister Sellers again brought his helicopter to a hover over the remaining crew members. Amid a fusillade of enemy bullets, Warrant Officer Sellers remained in this vulnerable position until all were on board and then proceeded to Phuoc Vinh’s medical hospital. Warrant Officer W1 Sellers’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1325 (April 20, 1971)

*SHAFFER, EARL THOMAS, SR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Thomas Shaffer, Sr. (RA34761131), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Sergeant Shaffer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1968 during a search and clear mission in a rubber plantation in Binh Long Province. His company’s mortar platoon was attacked by an estimated two companies of North Vietnamese regulars. The three other platoons attempted to reach the besieged element, but were halted by intense fire from several enemy machine guns, forcing them to deploy into a defensive perimeter. Despite the repeated assaults of the numerically superior foe, Sergeant Shaffer insisted on continuing to the stranded platoon. Moving beyond his company’s perimeter, he crawled past several hostile machine gun positions to the surrounded unit’s location where he found six men wounded and in need of medical attention. He treated the men while remaining exposed to intense enemy fire. Spotting the platoon leader lying seriously wounded, he unhesitatingly went to his assistance, although warned the man’s position was covered by an enemy machine gun. He was able to reach him, but was fatally wounded as he began to render medical aid. First Sergeant Shaffer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 405 (February 5, 1969)
Home Town: Covington, Georgia

*SIDERS, MARVIN ISAAC
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin Isaac Siders (OF-110427), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Siders distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 while leading his company on a search and clear operation. The unit made contact with a large, well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army force and during the initial volley was pinned down by the intense hostile fire and sustained heavy casualties. Captain Siders moved through the aggressors’ barrage to effectively position his troops and organize the evacuation of the wounded. After guiding in the ambulance helicopter and insuring that the injured men were safely evacuated, he ran to the foremost fighting position and directed both aerial rocket artillery and air strikes to within one hundred meters of his location. As he moved forward during a brief lull in the fighting to assess the damage of the tactical air strikes, the enemy suddenly unleashed a heavy bombardment of rocket, semi-automatic and automatic weapons fire. From his advanced position, Captain Siders spotted a strategic bunker which was directing the greatest volume of fire on his element. He immediately maneuvered toward the emplacement in a courageous attempt to draw the hostile fire. Skillfully employing his weapon and hurling grenades as he charged, Captain Siders was within feet of the fortification before being mortally wounded. Captain Siders’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 387 (February 4, 1969)
Home Town: Macy, Indiana

SIMONS, JAMES P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James P. Simons (0-5532898), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (airmobile). First Lieutenant Simons distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as team leader of a helicopter scout group during a ground search and destroy mission near Bong Son. When initial ground contact with Viet Cong was made, Lieutenant Simons began flying at tree-top level on the outskirts of the battle area to prevent enemy escape. He began to receive machine gun fire and maneuvered so that the observer with him could fire on the insurgents, killing two of the enemy in this manner. He then began to reconnoiter the battle area for landing zones in preparation for infiltration of a rifle platoon. He received intense machine gun fire from two small clearings but returned the fire and mortally wounded a Viet Cong gunner. Finding a zone free of enemy control, he led the helicopters through a successful infiltration. After rearming and refueling his aircraft, Lieutenant Simons returned and found the friendly force in close combat with the insurgents. Despite intense ground fire, he flew at tree-top level to mark hostile positions with smoke grenades for supporting armed aircraft. When it became evident that the ground troops were still unable to maneuver because of the heavily fortified Viet Cong emplacement, Lieutenant Simons hovered his helicopter over the hostile bunkers and dropped grenades on them. Seeing friendly casualties stranded near the insurgent emplacements, he hovered in front of the enemy positions, attracting the insurgents’ fire while the casualties were carried to safety. His aircraft was damaged by several enemy rounds, but he skillfully landed it outside the area of contact. First Lieutenant Simons’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4455 (September 1, 1967)
CPT James P. Simons died 30 July 2015

SNODDY, HAROLD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold M. Snoddy, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Snoddy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1969 during an enemy rocket attack followed by a ground assault on Landing Zone Grant. Almost immediately after the attack began, a contingent of sappers managed to overtake four perimeter bunkers. Sergeant Snoddy, who had volunteered to join the reaction force, quickly moved toward the threatened area to repel the assailants. As he made his way through the hail of enemy fire, he observed several hostile Soldiers just outside the berm preparing to launch a B-40 rocket. Unleashing a salvo of rifle fire, he eliminated the position. He resumed his advance on the enemy-held bunkers, and despite being thrown to the ground again and again by the concussion of satchel charges, he succeeded in recapturing a perimeter bunker by killing the enemy with hand grenades. From that position he hurled grenades into a nearby fortification, routing the hostile Soldiers. He then pursued the retreating Troopers as they withdrew to another bunker. In spite of sustaining a fragmentation wound, he continued to advance and killed two of the communists before they reached the bunker. Fearing that the position contained injured American personnel, he refrained from employing grenades and single-handedly charged the bunker to silence the remainder of the enemy force. Inside the bunker, he discovered a wounded comrade whom he treated and evacuated to safety. Sergeant Snoddy’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3396 (September 4, 1969)

*SPEER, RICHARD MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Michael Speer (263-98-8716), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Speer distinguished himself while leading a platoon during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Following a brief engagement with an enemy element, Lieutenant Speer led his platoon in pursuit of the fleeing enemy in order to maintain contact with them. After a short chase, the lieutenant noticed several enemy Soldiers lying in ambush on the trail ahead. He immediately placed devastating fire on the enemy while his platoon took cover. Constantly exposing himself to the enemy return fire, lieutenant Speer moved among his men, shouting encouragement and directing their fire. When his radio operator was wounded by the intensified enemy fire, he administered aid to him. Lieutenant Speer then directed artillery fire within meters of his position causing the enemy to flee with heavy casualties. Throughout the battle, he maintained complete control of the tactical situation until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Speer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4069 (August 31, 1970)
Home Town: Plant City, Florida

STEELEY, NOBLE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Noble L. Steeley (US55987783), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Steeley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1968 while serving as a helicopter door gunner on a combat mission near Quang Tri. When several attempts to evacuate three wounded Soldiers had failed, Specialist Steeley volunteered to go to their assistance. Inserted under heavy fire less than twenty meters from the communists, he ran to the men and found that two were still alive. He placed one of the wounded in the helicopter, but intense hostile fire forced the ship to leave before the other injured man could be brought aboard. Refusing to re-enter the helicopter, Specialist Steeley stayed with the remaining wounded man for an hour and forty-five minutes, while under continuous fire from positions as close as fifteen feet. During this time he directed helicopter gunships to the enemy positions and before a ground unit finally reached him, he had killed six of the aggressors. Specialist Four Steeley’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5770 (December 18, 1968)
SFC Noble L. Steeley died 29 March 1992 buried in Anderson, SC

STEPHENS, RUFUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rufus Stephens (0-5321191), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 17 February 1966, First Lieutenant Stephens was serving as Executive Officer, Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 1st Cavalry Division. He was accompanying the 3d Platoon in screening the high ground to company B’s flank. As the main force entered the Song Bien Valley, they were engaged by a Viet Cong force estimated to be a reinforced heavy weapons battalion which forced them to take defensive positions in three large bomb craters in the valley floor. The 3d Platoon in spite of being at a numerical disadvantage, launched an attack at the Viet Cong perimeter trying desperately to help the friendly defenders. As they came to within 100 meters of the company, they came under a heavy barrage of machine gun fire which seriously wounded the platoon leader. Lieutenant Stephens immediately took charge and began regrouping the platoon to prevent their positions from being overrun. Without regard for his own personal safety, he exposed himself to the continuous machine gun fire in order to direct the medical evacuation crafts to his location. After successfully evacuating the wounded, he returned to his platoon and readied his men for an attempt to join the besieged company. The first attempt was unsuccessful. The volume of fire was increasing all the time and caused Company B to lose contact with outside fire support. Noting the problem, Lieutenant Stephens again braved the hostile fire in order to get to a position from which he could better control the oncoming fire support for the friendly defenders. He was wounded in the arm but refused medical attention to that he could continue controlling fire support against the insurgent attackers. Realizing that one of the friendly aircraft was preparing for a bomb-run that would endanger the friendly positions, Lieutenant Stephens once again braved the barrage of insurgent fire and waved off the plane averting certain disaster for the friendly defenders. By increasing the rate of fire, a rifle company was able to air-assault into Lieutenant Stephens’ position and by joining forces they were able to make contact with the besieged company. By directing close-in tactical air strikes at the insurgents, the attacks were stopped. Lieutenant Stephens’ sustained performance during this period of actual combat was a source of inspiration to the men of the 3d Platoon. First Lieutenant Stephens’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 176 (July 29, 1966)

STEVENSON, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Stevenson (0-70515), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Lieutenant Colonel Stevenson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 March 1967 while commanding the 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry during an engagement with a large enemy force near Phu Ninh. Throughout the afternoon of the battle, he dauntlessly exposed himself to intense ground fire to direct the action from his command and control helicopter. Even after the aircraft sustained several hits, Colonel Stevenson continued to fly at low altitude over the ravaged area to ensure mission accomplishment. When one of his company commanders was killed and the situation rapidly deteriorated, he disregarded the mounting dangers and landed amidst a hail of hostile fire. Colonel Stevenson fearlessly moved about the battlefield, and comforted the casualties and shouted encouragement to the troops. As darkness fell, he consolidated the company perimeter and directed the collection of dead and wounded at a central point. Throughout the night, he commanded the battalion from his forward position and called for supporting fires and illumination devices which enabled the medevac aircraft to extract the wounded. Only when a new company commander was brought in the following morning did Colonel Stevenson leave the battle area. His great presence of mind and courageous example during the entire engagement saved many lives and were an immeasurable inspiration to his men as they repulsed the insurgent attack. Lieutenant Colonel Stevenson’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2791 (June 10, 1967)

*STOFLET, MICHAEL HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Howard Stoflet (55857498), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Stoflet distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1966, while his unit was being airlifted to reinforce a besieged American unit. As his platoon proceeded north from the landing zone to assist the friendly unit, it came under intense automatic weapons fire from several fortified Viet Cong bunkers. Private First Class Stoflet’s squad continued to advance until it was pinned down approximately 75 meters short of the hostile positions. Realizing the perilous position his comrades were in, he dauntlessly began a one-man assault on the insurgent emplacement. Despite the murderous volume of fire directed at him, Private First Class Stoflet succeeded in safely reaching the bunker, and immediately found an opening through which he could get inside. His first attempt to secure the position was nearly fatal, as a burst of automatic weapons fire sent him reeling backwards with a slight head wound. Momentarily stunned, Private First Class Stoflet again disregard his safety to vault back into the small opening. In this courageous effort to overcome the enemy, he was mortally wounded. His unimpeachable valor in the face of overwhelming odds enabled the platoon to overrun the Viet Cong position and accomplish its mission. Private First Class Stoflet’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 676 (February 15, 1967)
Born: June 11, 1945 at Burlington, Wisconsin
Home Town: Elkhorn, Wisconsin

*STONE, JAMES MARVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Marvin Stone (0-5329842), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Stone distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 as commanding officer of an airmobile infantry company on a search and destroy operation in the Que Son Valley. A sister unit had become heavily engaged in combat with a North Vietnamese Army battalion, and Lieutenant Stone led his men to reinforce the beleaguered troops. His company was savagely attacked with mortars and encircled by the enemy. He then directed maneuver elements of his unit to link up with an enveloped platoon of the second company while he led a furious assault against the numerically superior enemy. His slashing attack momentarily disorganized the hostile force and enabled the trapped platoon to move from its untenable position. As the enemy fusillade increased, Lieutenant Stone joined forces with the sister unit’s main body, deploying his men in abandoned trenches and directed devastating return fire on the attackers. As the intensity of the fight increased, it became necessary for the friendly force to break out of the enemy encirclement or face possible annihilation. Fully exposing himself to a withering hostile barrage, Lieutenant Stone called suppressing artillery fire against North Vietnamese positions and supervised the preparation of the wounded for movement. Braving ravaging mortar and recoilless rifle fire, he then directed his troops’ savage assault on the enemy lines. With bullets striking all around him, he led the fierce charge along a North Vietnamese trenchline and his men succeeded in breaking the encirclement. He was mortally wounded while fearlessly leading his company in close combat against a determined enemy force. First Lieutenant Stone’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1838 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*STREET, BRENT ANTHONY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Brent Anthony Street (522-76-3300), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Squadron, 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Street distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1970 while defending Fire Support Base Illingworth against an enemy attack in Tay Ninh Province. Following an intense barrage of hostile rocket and mortar fire, the enemy launched an aggressive ground assault on the allied base camp. Specialist Street immediately manned a fighting position located on a large berm and engaged the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades as they approached the base perimeter. As the battle raged on, the specialist’s weapon malfunctioned and his supply of grenades was exhausted. Refusing to withdraw, the remained on station and continued to resist the enemy utilizing hand to hand combat. When a nearby ammunition storage area caught fire, Specialist Street again refused to withdraw to a more secure position. As he continued his determined fight against the onrushing enemy, an enemy mortar round exploded beside Specialist Street, and mortally wounded him. Specialist Street’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4467 (September 21, 1970)
Home Town: Inglewood, California

*SWANN, JOHNNY DELBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnny Delbert Swann (255-70-3394), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Swann distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 September 1969 while serving as a team leader during a reconnaissance operation in Tay Ninh Province. His company was moving through thick jungle when it came under intense small arms and mortar barrages from a North Vietnamese force. In the initial contact several members of the point element were wounded, and the enemy immediately launched an assault against the weakened position. Realizing the enemy’s tactical plan, Specialist Swann deployed his fire team on line to meet the assault and to form a defensive perimeter in front of the two isolated men. Specialist Swann began moving through the dense underbrush to their aid. With his team providing cover fire, he reached the wounded point man and carried him through the hostile fusillade to the safety of the friendly defensive position. After insuring his wounded comrade received medical treatment, Specialist Swann returned through the hail of enemy fire and thick foliage to the injured medic and began carrying him from the exposed area. As Specialist Swann reached the defensive line of his team, he was fatally wounded by a burst of enemy fire. Specialist Four Swann’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4391 (December 6, 1969)
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia

SWEET, RICHARD SEARCY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard Searcy Sweet (0-64671), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Sweet distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 3 to 5 February 1968 as a battalion commander defending the city of Hue. Colonel Sweet was on the ground with his front line troops when the enemy launched an attack on the city. Positioning himself far forward, he disregarded the intense North Vietnamese mortar and sniper fire and expertly directed his forces in an advance toward Hue. His brilliant leadership enabled all four of his companies to successfully cross a wide open rice paddy into the city while under a constant enemy fusillade. He then led his battalion through the first line of enemy resistance, and by nightfall had succeeded in establishing a tight defensive perimeter. Under a steady hail of mortar and heavy automatic weapons fire from three sides, the battalion fiercely fought to retain its position. Early in the morning of 4 February the perimeter came under an extremely heavy bombardment and shortly thereafter began receiving ground attacks by large numbers of North Vietnamese Soldiers. The battalion was soon encircled by a North Vietnamese regiment, and heavy enemy fire rained on the defenders from all directions. Colonel Sweet skillfully directed the perimeter defense, personally encouraging his troops’ fight. Following their commander’s example, the officers and men of the battalion fought savagely to repulse the enemy. After dark, Colonel Sweet devised a plan to deceive the surrounding North Vietnamese forces and move through their positions to a new location deeper in their lines of communication. The entire battalion slipped through the enemy’s encirclement without suffering one casualty. Again Colonel Sweet’s example provided the inspiration for his troops and by daybreak they had successfully occupied commanding terrain deep inside the enemy’s area of operations. Lieutenant Colonel Sweet’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4158 (August 28, 1968)
Born: May 17, 1929 at Providence, Rhode Island
Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island

TACKABERRY, THOMAS H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas H. Tackaberry (0-60504), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1966 while serving as Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) on a search and destroy operation near Bong Son. At approximately 1500 hours a fifteen man patrol was engaged in an intense fire fight with a reinforced company of the North Vietnamese Army. The platoon leader had been killed and the patrol was pinned down. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry ordered his unarmed command helicopter to land near the action. Running through the intense fire, he reached the besieged patrol and assumed personal command of the unit. He then called for a reserve force to reinforce his position. As the reinforcements arrived in the landing zone, Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry again exposed himself to the full observation and fire of the insurgents as he positioned them for an attack on the North Vietnamese emplacements. With complete disregard for his safety, he personally led the assault on the forward hostile bunkers and succeeded in driving the insurgents from their positions. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry directed and assisted his men in clearing the captured bunkers, steadily forcing the numerically superior hostile unit to withdraw. Receiving word to extract his force, the patrol quickly returned to the landing zone and established a defensive perimeter. Two of the pickup helicopters were hit by intense fire from the rapidly regrouping hostile troops. Despite the threat of an all out insurgent assault on the landing zone, Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry refused to leave until the rest of his men had been extracted. Along with two remaining Soldiers, he dauntlessly continued to fire on the advancing hostile troops until being picked up by the unarmed command helicopter. Through his courage and leadership under the most critical of conditions, he contributed immeasurably to saving the trapped patrol from being overrun, and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile force. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6537 (November 28, 1966)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea), Distinguished Service Cross w/2nd OLC (Vietnam)

TAYLOR, RONALD S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald S. Taylor (0-5237610), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 as acting executive officer of his company during a mission in the Que Son Valley. His unit became engaged in heavy fighting with a reinforced North Vietnamese battalion. As the battle developed, Lieutenant Taylor, and an element of fifty men became surrounded by the hostile forces. He immediately made two attempts to break the enemy encirclement, but both were driven back. Lieutenant Taylor then ordered his men, twenty of whom were already wounded, into a hasty defensive perimeter. Constantly exposing himself to the continuing enemy fusillade, he moved from position to position as he called for and adjusted a ring of friendly artillery fire around the location of his troops. The determined enemy repeatedly assaulted the defenders, attempting to overrun them. Each attack was successfully repulsed by Lieutenant Taylor’s skillful adjustment of coordinated artillery barrages and the small arms and automatic weapons fire of his men. For more than twenty six hours he successfully directed the defense of the position inflicting heavy casualties on the North Vietnamese foe. First Lieutenant Taylor’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4093 (August 23, 1968)

*TAYLOR, WILLIAM EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Edward Taylor (0-84004), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 and 15 August 1966 while serving as commanding officer during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. Upon entering the operational area, the lead platoon became pinned down after making contact with a large Viet Cong force. Captain Taylor, moving at the head of the second platoon, exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun and sniper fire to direct the movement of his company. He repeatedly braved hostile fire while maneuvering his company to the Viet Cong flank. When the artillery forward observer was wounded, Captain Taylor moved to an advanced position and directed aerial rocket artillery and tactical air strikes. These strikes were called to within twenty meters of the friendly forward elements and caused the Viet Cong to break contact. When darkness fell, Captain Taylor personally supervised the evacuation of the dead and wounded. The following morning, as the company was preparing to continue its mission, it was again attacked by the Viet Cong employing mortar fire. Captain Taylor, with complete disregard for his safety while receiving intense hostile fire, refused to leave his observation post and continued to direct the defense of his perimeter. Although wounded by shrapnel, he continued to issue orders and exercise control of his unit until he was mortally wounded by an incoming mortar round. Captain Taylor’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5967 (1966)
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*TIERNEY, BRIAN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Brian Edward Tierney (US52722852), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Tierney distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1968 while serving as a radio telephone operator near Quang Tri City. Specialist Tierney and two other Soldiers entered a small village to capture a Viet Cong whose position had been spotted from a helicopter. When the point man saw the enemy crouching in a thicket and ordered him to surrender, the communist started to stand up as if to give himself up, but suddenly threw a grenade that he had been concealing. Seeing the deadly missile land a few feet from himself and his companions, Specialist Tierney shouted a warning and lunged towards the grenade to shield the others from the blast. Specialist Tierney was mortally wounded when the grenade exploded, but by his selfless act he saved his companions from injury. Specialist Four Tierney’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 728 (March 1, 1969)
Home Town: Roxbury, Connecticut

*TILLQUIST, ROBERT ARNOLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Arnold Tillquist (US51500892), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 November 1965, Specialist Tillquist, a medical corpsman attached to Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, was accompanying Company B on a search and destroy mission near Plei Me, Republic of Vietnam. As the lead platoon hacked its way through the dense Vietnamese jungle growth, they suddenly came upon a well-fortified Viet Cong emplacement, whereupon the point man immediately opened fire on the insurgent position. As the remainder of the company reached the area, they began a full scale assault on the hostile position. In what seemed to be a final defensive effort on the part of the insurgents, they steadily increased their fire on the advancing group. During this affray, a member of the friendly attacking force was wounded. A cry for a “medic” was heard, and Specialist Tillquist, who was in the front line of the assault, immediately gathered his medical equipment; went to the aid of the wounded man; administered first aid; and moved him to a better sheltered position, some thirty meters from the main line of fire. After securing his patient, he noticed that another of his comrades was wounded and lying in the midst of hostile fire. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he charged through the intense hostile barrage to the aid of the wounded man and again administered first aid, moving his comrade to a safer position. As he secured the second man, he saw another of his comrades fall wounded, directly in front of a Viet Cong machine gun emplacement. Despite being almost completely exhausted and disregarding his own personal safety, Specialist Tillquist stripped off his web gear; grabbed his rifle and aid kit; and began to crawl to the aid of the wounded man. During this valiant attempt, he was mortally wounded when hit in the back by a burst of fire from the hostile machine gun. Specialist Tillquist’s extraordinary heroism, compassion for his fellow man, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 43 (February 28, 1966)
Born: July 10, 1942 at Branford, Connecticut
Home Town: Branford, Connecticut

TOLSON, JOHN J., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Tolson, III (0-20806), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major General Tolson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 14 February 1968 to 27 March 1968, as Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division in Hue. During the Tet offensive the city was gravely endangered by North Vietnamese Army Forces, and General Tolson decided that only by personal liaison could he determine the situation and proper course of action. On three separate occasions he piloted his helicopter at low level through heavy enemy ground fire and adverse weather conditions to the Hue Citadel for urgent operational conferences with the embattled South Vietnamese commander. By establishing close liaison with the South Vietnamese commander, General Tolson developed a coordinated plan to liberate the city with minimum destruction to property and its friendly inhabitants. His personal bravery and leadership by example were an inspiration to the beleaguered defenders and gave the South Vietnamese commander renewed hope and confidence. On 14 February the Citadel was under siege when he again flew his aircraft through the intense hostile small arms fire to land at an allied command post. Upon finding two wounded marines in need of medical treatment, he directed his pilot to fly to a hospital. During the infantry assault on Hue, General Tolson landed his aircraft at each of the commander posts of the four 1st Air Cavalry battalions to effectively coordinate their attack. In so doing he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he flew at three top level over occupied terrain and often times landed while the maneuver battalions were engaging in combat with insurgent forces. The divisions overwhelming success in the liberation of Hue can be attributed to General Tolson’s dynamic leadership. Major General Tolson’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2806 (June 11, 1968)
Home Town: Raleigh, North Carolina

TOWLES, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by an act of Congress, 9 July 1918, (amended by act of 25 July 1963) has awarded the Distinguished Service Cross to Specialist Robert L. Towles, United States Army, for Extraordinary Heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, Specialist Four Robert L. Towles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action at Landing Zone Albany on 17 November 1965. During the course of an overland march, a numerically superior enemy force initiated contact with a heavy mortar barrage and struck from well-concealed positions cutting through the battalion’s line of march. Disregarding his wounds and own personal safety, Specialist Four Towles unhesitatingly exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire and singlehandedly attacked and disabled an enemy machine gun position. Stunned by the assault, enemy troops momentarily broke contact and fled, enabling the beleaguered troops to withdraw and evacuate their casualties. Specialist Four Towles returned and led his comrades toward the battalion’s defensive position and continue to hold back enemy troops until all the wounded had been extracted. On arrival in the perimeter, he took an active role in the battalion’s defense and proved instrumental in repelling two major enemy assaults on the position. Though surrounded by enemy forces, Specialist Four Towles volunteered to leave the battalion’s defensive perimeter and go into a contested battle area to retrieve tactical radios left behind. Specialist Four Towles’ extraordinary heroism, indomitable courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division and the United States Army.
Awarded 27 December 2013

TUSI, RONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald L. Tusi, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery F (AFA), 79th Artillery, 3d Brigade (Separate) 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Chief Warrant Officer Tusi distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 April 1972 while serving as pilot of a Cobra helicopter gunship in support of Vietnamese forces defending An Loc, the provincial capital of Binh Long Province. Outnumbered by three enemy divisions and more than 20 enemy tanks, the defenders at An Loc were forced to withdraw to a small area where the 5th Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division Headquarters was located. Heavy tactical air support was urgently needed to halt the attack, but its use was denied because of the grave danger it posed to civilians who were being held hostage by the enemy and hundreds of Soldiers who had been pinned down by the enemy tanks. Confident in his ability to provide protective firepower with pinpoint accuracy, Chief Warrant Officer Tusi committed himself to the battle. Despite extremely intense anti-aircraft fire, he launched a solo attack against the threatening enemy force by flying through anti-aircraft explosions that enveloped his gunship in smoke and personally destroyed four enemy tanks and damaged another. His devastating rocket attacks forced the remaining tanks to seek cover, and enabled Army of the Republic of Vietnam infantrymen to destroy all but two of the remaining enemy tanks. After halting the armor just meters short of their objective, chief Warrant Officer Tusi engaged the enemy infantry and forced scores to retreat from their attacks. Chief Warrant Officer Tusi’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1798 (August 4, 1972

*VINASSA, MICHAEL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael G. Vinassa (RA19835678), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Vinassa was serving as a Grenadier in the 3d Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), on a search and destroy operation in Binh Dinh Province. About 1500 hours on 21 May 1966, Company C was engaged by a large Viet Cong force that halted their advancement. The 3d Platoon was then given the mission of moving through the intense hostile fire to reinforce the right flank of Company C. A machine gun caused the 2d Squad to be pinned down. Specialist Vinassa started moving up the left draw delivering supporting fire that caused several of the insurgents to be killed. As the squad continued up the hill, several friendly defenders were wounded, however, Specialist Vinassa encouraged his comrades to follow him as he pressed forward. As they came in close to the Viet Cong positions, the insurgents began throwing grenades, at which time Specialist Vinassa had managed to crawl within ten meters of the machine gun position. As the machine gun poured deadly fire at the remaining members of the squad, Specialist Vinassa, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged through the open ten meters and threw a grenade at the emplacement destroying the gun and its crew. Just before the grenade went off, Specialist Vinassa was mortally wounded. His valor made it possible for the rest of the company to continue up the hill. Specialist Vinassa’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 230 (September 22, 1966)
Home Town: Culver City, California

WAITE, RAYMOND F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond F. Waite, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Waite distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 April 1972 while serving as gunner for a Light Observation Helicopter, involved in rescue operations of besieged friendly forces near An Loc, Republic of Vietnam. The small friendly element was surrounded by a battalion-size enemy force augmented with anti-aircraft weapons that claimed one man’s life the day before. As the helicopter in which he was flying approached the friendly element, American gunships began putting suppressive fire onto the enemy machine-gun and anti-aircraft positions. Despite the firepower massed against them, the enemy continued to direct intensive fire at the rescue ship. Upon reaching the friendly position, Sergeant Waite dismounted the aircraft to assist a wounded American advisor aboard, even though the enemy was directing intensive machine-gun fire at their position. After returning to the aircraft, he provided the only secure grasp to keep another American advisor, who was precariously hanging outside the aircraft, from falling to his death during the arduous low-level flight to a safe area following the extraction. Even though it took numerous hits, his aircraft carried 3 American advisors and 4 ARVN personnel to safety. Sergeant Waite’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1674 (July 29, 1972)

*WALLER, CASEY OWEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Casey Owen Waller (226-72-9734), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry (Airmobile). Specialist Four Waller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1970 while Fire Support Base Illingworth against an enemy attack in Tay Ninh Province. Following an intense barrage of hostile rocket and mortar fire, the enemy launched an aggressive ground assault on the allied base camp. Specialist Waller immediately left the relative security of his bunker to engage the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades as they approached the base camp perimeter. As the battle raged on, the specialist’s weapons malfunctioned and his supply of grenades was exhausted. Refusing to withdraw, he remained on station and continued to resist the enemy utilizing hand-to-hand combat. When a nearby artillery ammunition storage area caught fire, Specialist Waller again refused to withdraw to a more secure position. As he continued his determined fight against the onrushing enemy, the nearby ammunition exploded and mortally wounded him. Specialist Four Waller’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4335 (September 15, 1970)
Home Town: Cumberland, Virginia

WATTS, ALBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert R. Watts (RA19304157), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Watts distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 September 1966 while serving with elements of the 12th Cavalry assaulting an entrenched Viet Cong force near Bong Son. During the initial moments of the engagement, Sergeant Watts’ company sustained several casualties, who lay exposed a few meters in front of three hostile bunkers. Repeated attempts to reach the wounded men had failed, as the well fortified emplacements remained impervious, even to heliborne cannon strikes. Undaunted, Sergeant Watts maneuvered his platoon through devastating automatic weapons and machine gun fire, moving among his men, shouting encouragement and directing the attack. Realizing that his wounded comrades would soon die without medical aid, he ordered one squad to assault from the side while he charged the center bunker alone. Unmindful of the dangers and armed only with two hand grenades, Sergeant Watts ran across forty meters of bullet-swept terrain directly into the insurgent fire. Throwing both grenades through the firing ports, he silenced the position, killing all four Viet Cong inside. With the main hostile threat eliminated, the flanking team quickly overcame the second emplacement, but the platoon leader was wounded as the unit advanced on the last insurgent bunker. Assuming command, Sergeant Watts courageously led the final assault and safely reached the wounded men. His unimpeachable valor and selfless concern for others ensured the success of the mission and saved the lives of several fellow Soldiers. Platoon Sergeant Watts’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1090 (March 14, 1967)

*WAYCASTER, RICHARD LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Lee Waycaster (US53527713), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Waycaster distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 February 1969 as a machine gunner during a search and clear mission near Landing Zone Saint Barbara in Tay Ninh Province. While the point element of his company was crossing an open field, it came under heavy fire from concealed positions and several members were seriously wounded. Specialist Waycaster immediately advanced through the bullet-swept area, firing his machine gun as he went. Reaching an unprotected sector, he laid down an effective barrage which silenced the enemy automatic weapons positions. After taking his machine gun to another point from which he could cover several of his comrades who were evacuating the casualties, he was wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire, but he continued to provide suppressive fire until the wounded had been brought to safety. As he started to withdraw to his company’s defensive perimeter, he spotted a wounded comrade who had not been seen by the others and moved to assist him. When he had reached the fallen Trooper the enemy unleashed a heavy volume of fire at the two men. Specialist Waycaster covered the man’s body with his own and was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Waycaster’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1533 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: Horse Shoe, North Carolina

WEST, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. West, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the 1st Cavalry Division engaged in operations against overwhelming enemy forces near a fire support base center in the Kingdom of Cambodia on 2 May 1970. When approaching a downed pilot who had parachuted from his crippled aircraft, Specialist West’s aircraft came under intense enemy antiaircraft, automatic weapons and rocket fire. Noticing that the pilot was suspended from a tree and that the vegetation was too dense to land, Specialist West unselfishly volunteered to rescue the injured individual. Despite the strafing enemy fire, Specialist West descended the rope, crossed a clearing and attempted to free the pilot from his harness. Unable to free the pilot, he returned 50 meters to the helicopter in order to obtain a knife. Again, and with great courage and daring Specialist West returned through the hostile fire to the stranded pilot. Cutting the pilot loose, Specialist West then dragged him, despite closely impacting rounds, to the survival rope hanging from the aircraft. Because of severe rope burns Specialist West was unable to climb the rope. He wrapped his body around the pilot to protect him. Still using his body to protect the pilot and hanging from the rope 70 feet below the aircraft, Specialist West was flown through 1,500 meters of enemy fire to an open field where the aircraft landed and the injured pilot was put aboard. His extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1971)

WHITEHEAD, JOHN B., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John B. Whitehead, III, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallant conduct while pilot of a light observation helicopter near An Loc, Republic of Vietnam on 8 April 1972. During rescue operations of a besieged friendly force, a friendly relief column was moving from An Loc to Loc Ninh to relieve the defenders of Loc Ninh. The relief column came under heavy enemy attack about four miles north of An Loc and an element of South Vietnamese Soldiers along with three American advisors were completely cut off and surrounded. Three attempts were made by helicopter to rescue the surrounded element, but all were repulsed by heavy antiaircraft fire. On 8 April 1972 another rescue attempt was made with Captain Whitehead as the pilot of one of the rescue aircraft. After numerous airstrikes on the enemy positions surrounding the friendly element, Captain Whitehead’s aircraft proceeded towards the friendly location, his aircraft began to receive intensive enemy small arms fire. Through his own courage and determination to save American lives, Captain Whitehead landed in the midst of the surrounded element under this intensive fire. With his aircraft designed to carry only four personnel, Captain Whitehead and his crew chief picked up the three American advisors and four South Vietnamese Soldiers, who held on to the skids of the aircraft. With the aircraft in this dangerously overloaded situation Captain Whitehead was barely able to take off and was unable to gain any altitude. He had to fly low over known enemy locations receiving enemy fire until they reached safety. Captain Whitehead knowingly flew into an area surrounded by hostile forces to save American lives at the risk of his own. Captain Whitehead’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 18 (May 29, 1973)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia

*WIDEMAN, ELVIN JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elvin Joseph Wideman (RA17584012), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Wideman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966 while serving as a squad leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry on a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. When the lead element became heavily engaged with a Viet Cong force, his platoon moved forward to provide fire support. As the unit maneuvered into position it was suddenly pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from several fortified bunkers to their immediate front. Pinpointing the insurgent positions, Sergeant Wideman directed three of his men to cover him as he dauntlessly crawled forward alone. When he arrived at a point near one bunker, he threw a grenade into it and destroyed the emplacement. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Wideman then ran through the fierce hostile barrage to another emplacement where he killed all the Viet Cong with his rifle. Unmindful of the inherent dangers, Sergeant Wideman courageously advanced toward another bunker a few meters away. As he raised up to toss a grenade, he was mortally wounded by machine gun fire. With the last effort of his strength, he flung the grenade into the emplacement, killing all the insurgents inside. His conspicuous gallantry saved many of his comrades from death or injury and contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the Viet Cong force. Staff Sergeant Wideman’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 354 (January 25, 1967)
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

WRIGHT, LARRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry D. Wright (RA16798308), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Five Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 October 1966 while serving as door gunner on the command helicopter during aerial support of combat maneuvers near Hung Lac. Prior to the infiltration of infantry units into this area, Specialist Wright’s helicopter surveyed the territory, spotting small groups approaching the village of Hung Lac. An infantry platoon was helilifted into a landing zone to search the village and made heavy contact with a Viet Cong Battalion. Specialist Wright’s aircraft quickly flew in and hovered over the friendly unit, enabling him to pour suppressive fire into the enemy emplacements. During the fierce firefight, he spotted several Viet Cong in a trench about to ambush a friendly element. His extremely accurate fire, to within three meters of the friendly Soldiers, destroyed the ambush and killed several of the attackers. When confronted with a machine gun position firing directly at his aircraft, Specialist Wright disregarded his personal safety by stepping out onto the skid of the helicopter and destroying that emplacement. Having landed near a pinned down squad, Specialist Wright again ignored the threat of hostile fire which ravaged the zone to race to the side of a wounded man lying in the open. He carried the casualty to the aircraft and placed him aboard just as enemy rounds hit the helicopter’s hydraulic system and fuel cell. After the pilot flew to safety 150 meters away, Specialist Wright returned to the battlefield in an unarmed helicopter to rescue two more wounded men. Throughout the battle, he dauntlessly ignored imminent danger to himself to support the infantry forces. Specialist Five Wright’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2497 (May 30, 1967)

WYMER, MERRILL F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Merrill F. Wymer, Jr. (0-5241669), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Wymer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 August 1967 while serving as surgeon of an infantry battalion on a search and destroy mission in the Soui Ca Valley. Notified that wounded members of his battalion were in critical need of medical assistance, Captain Wymer immediately secured a helicopter and flew to the battle site. He landed in total darkness with fighting raging all around him and dashed to the front to treat the wounded who were pinned down close to enemy bunkers. He constantly exposed himself to ravaging Viet Cong firepower, disregarding his own safety to treat his seriously wounded comrades. With bullets constantly striking all around him, he moved from man to man administering aid and moving the men to more secure positions. For more than five hours he repeatedly refused to take cover although enemy fire constantly raked his positions as he moved across the bullet-swept terrain in front of friendly positions. He repeatedly and skillfully administered treatment in the darkness while the insurgents sought to stop his gallant efforts. His fearless actions in the face of grave danger were responsible for saving twelve lives and greatly inspired the friendly ground forces to fight on through the night to defeat the determined enemy. Captain Wymer’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6208 (December 1, 1967)

*ZERR, KENT MARTIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Kent Martin Zerr (263-70-5993), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Zerr distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 March 1970 while serving as point man of a rifle platoon operating near the Cambodian border in search of a suspected enemy bunker complex. While moving toward the suspected enemy area, Specialist Zerr spotted the first enemy bunker and alerted the rest of the platoon. As the platoon began to sweep the bunker complex, they came under intense machine gun and automatic weapons fire from an estimated company-size enemy force. One of Specialist Zerr’s comrades was wounded at the beginning of the conflict. Specialist Zerr exposed himself to intense enemy fire as he rushed to his comrade’s aid and moved him to a rear area. When Specialist Zerr returned to the contact area, he found his unit embattled from the front and on both flanks. Noticing an enemy machine gun position only fifteen meters away, Specialist Zerr crawled forward through enemy fire and threw a hand grenade into the bunker, destroying the machine gun and killing the bunker’s three occupants. Ordered to withdraw so that gunships could be called in on the enemy positions, Specialist Zerr volunteered to provide cover fire for his platoon’s withdrawal. Specialist Zerr’s bravery exposed himself as he placed suppressive fire on the enemy positions and received return fire. While performing this mission, he was mortally wounded by enemy automatic weapons fire. Specialist Four Zerr’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1944 (June 21, 1970)
Home Town: Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

*Awarded Posthumously

Distinguished Service Cross

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces). It is awarded for extraordinary heroism:

While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States;
While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy and Marine Corps, and Coast Guard when operating under the authority of the Department of the Navy) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force).

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