DSC Korean War Citations

1st Cavalry Division Distinguished Service Cross

Korean War

Troopers of the 1st Cavalry Division have been awarded 261 Distinguished Service Crosses in four wars, with 113 of them being awarded posthumously.  There were no Distinguished Service Crosses awarded to First Team Troopers during the Gulf War or from service in Afghanistan.

Citations

ANDERSON, CLARENCE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clarence L. Anderson (0-61069), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Officer attached to the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Anderson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Unsan, Korea, on 1 and 2 November 1950. On the afternoon of 1 November 1950, and continuing through the following thirty-six hours, the regiment was subjected to a relentless, fanatical attack by the enemy. At approximately 0100 hours, the enemy penetrated the lines and the 3d Battalion was ordered to cover the withdrawal of the remaining regimental units. When the enemy mounted a strong attack against the battalion, Captain Anderson, with complete disregard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to administer medical attention to the wounded. At approximately 0200 hours, the battalion was ordered to begin its withdrawal. Fully realizing the hazards involved, Captain Anderson voluntarily remained behind as the battalion withdrew in order to give medical assistance to wounded personnel. Captain Anderson’s gallant decision to remain with his wounded comrades reflects utmost credit on himself and the medical profession.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 256 (May 1, 1951)
Home Town: Anderson, Tennessee*ASHWORTH, ALTON M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alton M. Ashworth (ER38589076), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Ashworth distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Unsan-ni, North Korea, on 2 December 1950. Sergeant Ashworth’s company was assigned the mission of securing the high ground along the edge of a route over which the regiment was planning a withdrawal to escape an enemy trap. As the men moved into the assault, they encountered intense machine-gun fire from an enemy emplacement on their left flank. As Sergeant Ashworth deployed his men into position to silence the weapon, they were pinned down by the fire of a second machinegun. Realizing that his initial mission could not be completed until this new threat was neutralized, he immediately moved forward to within ten feet of the emplacement and silenced the weapon with grenades. Suddenly an enemy Soldier charged down upon him with a grenade in his hand. Sergeant Ashworth successfully cut him down with a burst from his carbine, but was mortally wounded by fragments from the exploding grenade. Although he was dying on his feet, he refused evacuation but instead organized his men and led them forward in a charge which secured the main objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 620 (August 6, 1951)
Home Town: Muskogee, Oklahoma

*ATWOOD, VIRGIL MILTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Virgil Milton Atwood (0-2262952), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Atwood distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Okkye-ri, Korea, on 3 June 1951. Lieutenant Atwood was the leader of the assault platoon in an attack against an enemy-held hill. As the platoon advanced to the crest of the hill, it was suddenly subjected to intense enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from well-fortified and camouflaged emplacements manned by a hostile force estimated at battalion strength. Realizing that in their present exposed position the platoon faced annihilation, Lieutenant Atwood, with complete disregard for his personal safety, charged up the slope toward the entrenchments. His heroic single-handed assault so surprised the enemy that they momentarily forgot the platoon, granting it time to seek cover, and instead concentrated their fire on Lieutenant Atwood. Rapidly firing his carbine and throwing grenades among the confused enemy, he leaped into their midst and killed approximately twenty of them in addition to rendering six automatic weapons useless. With the enemy in his immediate vicinity eliminated, Lieutenant Atwood began to move forward once mere but was hit and instantly killed by a bursting enemy shell.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 695 (September 14, 1951)
Home Town: Talladega, Alabama

*BAXTER, EARL ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Robert Baxter (RA20134815), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Baxter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 15 September 1950. On that date, the 2d platoon of Company L had seized Hill 401 and was preparing to reorganize and establish a defensive perimeter when the enemy suddenly launched a fanatical counterattack. The platoon withstood the assault until an acute shortage of ammunition made a withdrawal inevitable. Sergeant First Class Baxter, who had temporarily assumed command while the platoon sergeant attended a wounded man, ordered the platoon to withdraw while he remained behind to furnish covering fire. Standing fully exposed to the enemy, Sergeant Baxter placed a withering stream of fire on the on-rushing enemy horde until he was killed by an enemy grenade. When Company L later regained the hill, Sergeant Baxter’s body was found with ten enemy Soldiers lying nearby, attesting to the accuracy of his fire and grim determination to prevent the enemy routing the platoon’s withdrawal. Undoubtedly the enemy suffered numerous other casualties as a result of his heroic action which enabled his comrades to withdraw with minimum losses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 328 (May 20, 1951)
Home Town: Milton, Vermont

*BELTZ, LLOYD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lloyd E. Beltz (RA24289099), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Beltz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonchon, Korea, on 5 October 1951. On that date, Private Beltz’s platoon was ordered to attack and secure commanding terrain tenaciously defended by superior enemy forces. Having advanced to within seventy-five yards of the objective, the platoon was pinned down by intense fire from two enemy machine-gun nests and sustained several casualties. On his own initiative, Private Beltz cradled his light machine-gun in his arms and advanced on the enemy entrenchments. In spite of the intense fire, seemingly directed only at him, Private Beltz, alone and unaided, dispersed and destroyed the enemy position. As the platoon moved forward to join him, Private Beltz charged the last, slightly lower fringe of terrain from which enemy fire emanated and, with very little ammunition remaining in his belt, successfully dispersed the enemy and secured the objective. In the last stages of the attack, he was mortally wounded by machine gun fire from an adjacent hill.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 20 (May 25, 1956)
Home Town: Elizabeth City, Virginia

*BRUINOOGE, MARINUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marinus Bruinooge (0-1334095), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Bruinooge distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Konjiam-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Committed to attack and secure commanding terrain tenaciously defended by a well-fortified hostile force, Lieutenant Bruinooge’s platoon was pinned down within 150 yards of its objective by intense automatic-weapons, small-arms, and mortar fire and suffered numerous casualties. After artillery and mortar fire had been placed on the enemy position, he again led his men forward, but was halted by a vicious barrage of fire from two machine-guns and an emplacement employing grenades. Making a one-man assault at approximately 1800 hours, he advanced within twenty yards and was wounded, but gallantly forged on and, after lobbing a grenade into the position, closed with the enemy and killed its four occupants. Observing the nearest machine-gun was but twenty-five yards distant, he harassed the gunners with grenades and then, fearlessly rushing forward, fired his carbine full automatic into the foxhole until he was mortally wounded. His intrepid actions retarded the onslaught, enabled evacuation of the wounded, and contributed significantly to the subsequent accomplishment of the mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)
Home Town: Bergen, New Jersey

BURKE, LLOYD LESLIE “SCOOTER”
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lloyd Leslie “Scooter” Burke, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Burke distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Samso-ri, Korea, on 26 November 1950. On that date, while Company F was moving toward Sunchon, Korea, contact was made with a strong enemy force that had infiltrated friendly lines and established a roadblock. Ordered to secure possession of a commanding ridge on which the enemy was well entrenched, Lieutenant Burke organized his men and personally led an attack against the enemy position. Blazing fire met the assaulting group and it was forced to fall back. Four times Lieutenant burke heroically rallied his men and with dogged determination led them against the death-spitting ridge, and each time they were forced to fall back because of the withering fire. Spotting the location of an enemy machine-gun position that was the major stumbling block in the attack, Lieutenant Burke crawled forward, heedless of the enemy fire which chewed and churned the dirt around him, until he was within grenade range. Despite the murderous fire now being directed at him, he accurately lobbed several grenades into the machine-gun nest, completely obliterating it. Having eliminated this obstacle, he dauntlessly arose and valiantly led his inspired men in a fifth furious assault on the ridge and successfully secured it.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 253 (May 1, 1951)
Born: September 29, 1924 at Tichnor, Arkansas
Home Town: Stuttgart, Arkansas
Other Award: Medal of Honor (Korea)

*CALDWELL, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James L. Caldwell (0-2005656), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Caldwell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Homangi, Korea, on 5 October 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and occupying commanding ground tenaciously defended by a strongly fortified hostile force, Lieutenant Caldwell’s platoon moved up the rugged slope of the hill under devastating small-arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. He led his platoon in a charge and was the first to enter the enemy position. Forced to withdraw for lack of ammunition, he reorganized and led a second but unsuccessful charge. Although wounded twice by small-arms fire while rallying and regrouping to renew the assault, he refused medical treatment and continued to lead the platoon through withering fire until he was struck by a mortar burst and fell mortally wounded on the crest of the hill. Inspired by the incredible courage of their valiant leader, Lieutenant Caldwell’s resolute Troopers stormed forward with such ferocity that the enemy was overwhelmed and the key terrain feature secured.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 54 (May 29, 1952)
Home Town: Wake, North Carolina

CARDOZA, HOWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard W. Cardoza (0-1177318), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Cardoza distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Waegwan, Korea, on 16 August 1950. Lieutenant Cardoza’s tank platoon was operating in direct support of the infantry whose mission was to take a hill just outside of Waegwan. The enemy, well entrenched on the hill, was delivering intense small-arms, mortar, and artillery fire. Lieutenant Cardoza moved his tank forward to the infantry positions in order to place fire on the enemy. Then, with total disregard for his personal safety, he crawled out of the tank onto the rear deck to direct the fire of his platoon. Firing the .50-caliber machine-gun, which was mounted on the turret, Lieutenant Cardoza in this manner pointed out the enemy targets to his gunners. During this action an enemy shell exploded next to Lieutenant Cardoza’s tank seriously wounding him in the head, legs and arm. Although his left arm was useless, he continued to fire the .50-caliber machine-gun with one arm until he collapsed from loss of blood. It was only because of the devastating tank fire directed by Lieutenant Cardoza on the enemy that the infantry was able to continue on and accomplish its mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 99 (October 5, 1950).
Home Town: Mercer, Pennsylvania

*CHANEY, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald L. Chaney (RA16323879), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Chaney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Shindo, Korea, on 9 August 1950. While participating in an attack, Private Chaney’s platoon was given the difficult mission of wresting and securing triangulation hill from the enemy who had deeply entrenched positions on its summit. As the platoon attacked up the forward slopes of the hill, it was pinned down by intense automatic weapons and small-arms fire. Private Chaney voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, stood erect and firing his automatic rifle from the hip charged up the hill. In this action he killed five of the enemy before he was wounded in the right shoulder by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. Disregarding orders from his superior to go to the rear for medical treatment, and despite excruciating pain in his right shoulder, Private Chaney changed position with his automatic rifle, shifting it to his left side and continued forward. By his act of aggressiveness and courage he single-handedly wiped out two machine-gun emplacements and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy, thereby enabling the platoon to secure the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 39 (January 23, 1951)
Home Town: Cass, Michigan

*CLINCH, WILLARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willard L. Clinch (RA12284679), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Clinch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pabalmak, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, Company C was engaged in an assault against a well-fortified and camouflaged enemy force holding positions on Hill 350. As Corporal Clinch led his squad forward, the men were suddenly subjected to intense and accurate fire from hidden enemy snipers. As the men began to falter, he moved out toward the objective, shouting words of encouragement to his squad and urging them to follow. Inspired by his courage, the men renewed their assault and had moved to within thirty yards of the crest of the hill when they were met by a devastating volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from the hostile emplacements. This forced them to seek cover. With the enemy hurling grenades down the hill, the positions soon became untenable and Corporal Clinch, realizing that his men faced annihilation, unhesitatingly charged forward across the fire-swept terrain. Upon reaching a point ten yards form the enemy defense, he knelt and threw grenades until he had succeeded in neutralizing the enemy resistance at that point. Then, while urging his men forward in the assault, he was hit and mortally wounded by sniper fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 716 (September 22, 1951)
Home Town: Madison, New York

*CONDON, STEPHEN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen A. Condon (RA37518416), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in a platoon of Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Condon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Korea, on 19 October 1950. On that date, Company F had the mission of enveloping and destroying hostile positions in the city of Pyongyang. As the lead squad, of which Sergeant Condon was leader, moved a short distance into the city, it encountered withering short-range fire from an enemy machine gun. Realizing that his squad was in imminent danger of annihilation unless the weapon was silenced, Sergeant Condon single-handedly charged the hostile emplacement and succeeded in destroying the machine-gun. While attempting to return to his squad, he was killed by a burst of small-arms fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 553 (July 17, 1951)
Home Town: San Bernardino, California

COOK, ARON E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Aron E. Cook (RA06289766), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Cook distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Konjiam-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Sergeant Cook’s platoon was given the mission of securing an objective on Hill 578, which had been holding up the regiment’s advance for two days. After overcoming heavy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire, Sergeant Cook so skillfully directed the seizure of the objective that no casualties were suffered by his platoon. While reorganizing his platoon, Sergeant Cook and the machine-gunner were wounded as the enemy launched a fierce counterattack. Disregarding his own wound, Sergeant Cook rushed forward and rolled his comrade from an exposed position to one of comparative safety and then began firing the machine-gun himself. The enemy, suffering extremely heavy losses as a result of his devastating fire, concentrated their assault against Sergeant Cook’s position. When they pushed to within a few feet of his emplacement, Sergeant Cook leaped from his position and charged the enemy, throwing hand grenades. This sudden and aggressive act so demoralized the enemy that they broke and fled in confusion. Wounded a second time in this action, Sergeant Cook refused medical aid until he had assured himself that his platoon was effectively reorganized and its position consolidated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 632 (August 11, 1951)
Home Town: Harris, Texas

COPELAND, LEE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lee E. Copeland (RA15203196), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Gunner with the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Copeland distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yong-dong, Korea, on 22 July 1950. When an enemy force of great strength launched a fanatical banzai attack against the 1st Battalion, Sergeant Copeland displayed great initiative and unfaltering fortitude. While his platoon withdrew to better ground, he held his position and started firing his machine-gun into enemy forces. As the enemy turned artillery and mortar fire upon him, he dashed from spot to spot carrying his machine-gun, stopping in each new position to fire his carbine and toss grenades while waiting for the machine-gun barrel to cool sufficiently to resume firing. Sergeant Copeland’s effectiveness and heroic action enabled the platoon time to withdraw and set up a new defense. He then fought his way back into the Company perimeter where he continued to lend supporting fire and helped to organize the defense during the five-hour grueling attack. His leadership, courage, and exemplary conduct were an inspiration to the members of the Company and spurred them to victory despite the overwhelming disadvantages. Sergeant Copeland’s outstanding performance and heroic action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 2 (January 14, 1963)

CROMBEZ, MARCEL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Marcel G. Crombez, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Colonel Crombez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koksu-ri and Chipyong-ni, Korea on 15 and 16 February 1951. After the 23rd Infantry Regimental Combat Team was cut off and surrounded by five enemy divisions, a task force consisting of twenty-three tanks and one infantry company was organized and committed to attempt a break-through to the beleaguered force. Realizing the desperate plight of the besieged combat team, Colonel Crombez elected to lead the task force and, proceeding toward Koksu-ri on a narrow valley road, the unit came under devastating automatic weapons, mortar, small arms, and rocket launcher fire from a well-fortified road block, halting the advance. Colonel Crombez immediately coordinated an attack on the roadblock, pointing out targets to the tank gunners and directing the infantry in dispersing fanatical bazooka teams and antitank crews. When the lead tank was disabled and the tank company commander became a casualty, Colonel Crombez gallantly moved his own tank forward to spearhead the advance and, dominating and controlling the critical situation by sheer force of his heroic example, effected the break-through to the regimental combat team, contained the assault, and reopened vital lines of communication. Colonel Crombez’s valor and intrepidity inspired his officers and men to fight with great courage and skill, culminating in a toll of approximately 500 enemy dead, routing remaining hostile troops, and reflecting utmost credit on himself and the esteemed traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 27 (January 29, 1952)

*DAVIS, COURTENAY CHIRM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Courtney Chirm Davis, Jr. (0-59384), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 13 September 1950. On 12 September 1950 the enemy, in overwhelmingly superior numbers, attacked a hill occupied by Company B and forced them to withdraw. On the following day, Company B initiated a counterattack to regain the lost ground, and Lieutenant Davis was assigned the mission of leading his platoon in the attack. Devoid of cover or concealment, he fearlessly led his men up the hill toward the heavily armed, well- entrenched enemy. As they struggled upward, they were subjected to intense machine-gun and small-arms fire. Shouting words of encouragement to his platoon, Lieutenant Davis courageously exposed himself to the withering fire, spurring his men to greater effort. As the attack continued against almost insurmountable odds, he was seriously wounded. Refusing to leave his men, he half-hobbled, half-crawled toward the objective, valiantly directing the assault until he was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. Inspired by the dauntless actions of their leader, the men of Lieutenant Davis’ platoon charged the enemy emplacement with such fury that the hostile troops became disorganized and fled in disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 267, (May 4, 1951)
Home Town: Laramie, Wyoming

*DAVIS, MARVIN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin L. Davis (RA16310338), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, Seventh Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill, preceded by an intense artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent that the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Corporal Davis a machine-gunner attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained at his gun delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his position was overrun, then began throwing hand grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Corporal Davis was found dead beside his machine-gun, and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead. The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Davis enabled his company to execute a successful withdrawal with minimum casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 460 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Floyd, Indiana

*DEPALMA, FRED P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fred P. DePalma (0-59828), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain DePalma distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. While attacking a heavily defended enemy position blocking the American drive northward along the Taegu-Waegwan road, Captain DePalma’s company came under and was pinned down by intense enemy tank, mortar and small-arms fire. In the ensuing action Captain DePalma, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved form position to position in the intense enemy fire to rally his troops and issue instructions for continuing the attack. When ambushed by two enemy snipers at very close range, he returned their fire and killed them both. Stimulated by is selfless courage and inspirational leadership, his men left their places of concealment and launched a full-scale attack on the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties and destroying large quantities of ammunition and equipment. Though wounded during the attack, he refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his men forward until the objective had been taken. When his company was directed to withdraw from their newly-won position, he voluntarily elected to remain behind to cover his unit’s withdrawal and insure that all the wounded were evacuated. In attempting to rejoin the company, Captain DePalma was ambushed by an enemy patrol and in the fighting that followed he single-handedly killed six of the enemy before he was killed. Captain DePalma’s selfless courage and conspicuous devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire was responsible for opening a main supply route on the United Nations drive to the north.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 182 (March 30, 1951)
Home Town: Westchester, New York

*DUBINSKY, STEPHEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen Dubinsky (0-1339149), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Dubinsky distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yong-dong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. On this date Lieutenant Dubinsky, with his platoon, was in a defensive position in an isolated platoon sector. During the hours of darkness numerically superior enemy forces infiltrated to within fifty yards of the platoon’s position and attacked at dawn, supported by mortar and automatic-weapons fire. Lieutenant Dubinsky repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in directing and coordinating the defense of his platoon’s position. When the position became untenable, he ordered his unit to withdraw, remaining behind to cover the withdrawal. By this time his position was completely surrounded and, without regard for his own personal safety, he called for mortar fire on his position. The well- directed fire struck the position, routing the enemy and saved the platoon’s position. After the third volley First Lieutenant Dubinsky was not heard from again.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

*EILER, RICHARD O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard O. Eiler (0-58140), First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company D, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Eiler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kasan, Korea, on 5 September 1950. Defending the right flank of the company perimeter, Lieutenant Eiler’s platoon was subjected to vicious hostile fire from two machine-guns which reduced its strength to twelve men, several of whom were wounded. In order to save his depleted unit from potential annihilation, Lieutenant Eiler crawled fifty yards up a slope, threw two grenades into an emplacement, and silenced one harassing gun. Returning to his platoon, he ordered its withdrawal in the face of a renewed and determined enemy attack, and proceeded to provide covering fire for his men. While assisting the wounded men over a high wall obstructing the withdrawal, he was seriously wounded, but ordered his men to continue on to safety without him. Selecting a position which provided an excellent field of observation, he delivered a withering fire into the hostile ranks until his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Pima, Arizona

FLERCHINGER, HUBERT P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hubert P. Flerchinger, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Flerchinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wanjong-dong, Korea, on 10 and 11 September 1950. While his unit was defending a hill position it came under, and was pinned down by, intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. In the ensuing action Sergeant Flerchinger moved about in the heavy enemy fire to successfully direct the defense of his platoon for more than six hours at which time the numerically superior enemy forced them to withdraw. Withdrawing to the base of the hill Sergeant Flerchinger immediately reorganized his forces and personally led them in a fierce counterattack which regained the summit despite bitter enemy resistance. While reestablishing a defense line in this position his unit was fired upon by a nest of enemy snipers which caused several casualties. Armed with only two hand grenades, Sergeant Flerchinger crawled forward to their position in an effort to destroy it. Finding ten enemy Soldiers occupying the fox-hole, he engaged them, killing two and wounding three with his hand grenades and forcing four to flee. Grappling with the last remaining enemy in hand to hand combat, Sergeant Flerchinger lifted his opponent above his head, holding him in this position until he was shot by another Soldier. Although severely mauled in the action Sergeant Flerchinger refused to be evacuated and remaining with his men effectively directed the successful defense of his regained position. Sergeant Flerchinger’s fearless courage, inspiring aggressiveness, and superb leadership was responsible for inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and turned a possible defeat into victory. His extraordinary heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951)

GAY, HOBART R.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Hobart R. Gay, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division. Major General Gay distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea during the period from 18 July to 1 October 1950. During this period, although faced by overwhelming numerical superiority, General Gay so skillfully led his Division that the enemy’s advance was slowed and ultimately halted along the Naktong River Line. His continuous presence at the front under enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire with total disregard for his own personal safety was an inspiration to his men during the critical period of the United Nations buildup. On 25 September 1950, the Division made a break-through at Tabu-dong. General Gay joined the task force formed to exploit the success, placing his quarter-ton vehicle behind the two leading tanks, taking part in numerous firefights. In one instance the lead tank was hit by enemy antitank fire, halting the column. Realizing the seriousness of the situation and the necessity for pushing forward, General Gay made his way under enemy fire to the lead tank and personally directed accurate fire at the enemy antitank guns, which eliminated them. His aggressive leadership, courage under fire, and personal heroism, enable the task force to continue its rapid advance and prevented the enemy from organizing a defensive position which would have nullified the breakthrough.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 109 (October 10, 1950)
Born: May 16, 1894 at Rockport, Illinois
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*HAGAN, FRANK D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank D. Hagan (RA19301631), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Hagan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sonbyok, Korea, on the night of 28 September 1951. On that night Corporal Hagan’s company was occupying positions on a strategic hill when it was attacked by a large hostile force. The majority of the enemy troops concentrated their assault against the left flank of the company perimeter where Corporal Hagan’s position was located. The intense enemy fire caused the defenders in this sector to execute a limited withdrawal but Corporal Hagan, realizing that his own position was now the key to the friendly defense, remained in his emplacement with unflinching determination, firing rapidly into the charging foe. Observing that one position was all that barred their advance, the enemy force converged on Corporal Hagan, who fought with such ferocity and courageous singleness of purpose that eighteen of them were killed before his position was overrun. The heroic action of Corporal Hagan enabled his company to form a new defense line from which they counterattacked the hostile force and routed them from the hill with heavy casualties. When Corporal Hagan’s emplacement was retaken by his comrades, he was found dead among the enemy he had killed, still clutching his bayonet in his hand.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 102 (February 21, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*HANSEL, MORGAN B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Morgan B. Hansel (0-1825120), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Hansel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kunu-ri, Korea, on 3 and 4 November 1950. When his unit was heavily engaged in trying to seize and hold vital high ground, Lieutenant Hansel noticed that the platoon on his right flank was receiving very heavy enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire and was rapidly becoming disorganized. He left his position of relative safety and made his way out to them under a hail of fire to effect their reorganization. Locating the enemy machine-gun and automatic weapons that were firing upon the platoon with such telling effect, Lieutenant Hansel arose to his feet and, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged the enemy emplacements single-handed, armed only with his carbine. He succeeded in reaching the hostile positions and killed the machine-gunner, giving almost instant respite to our forces, but in the ensuing, action he was mortally wounded by one of the remaining enemy automatic riflemen. Because of First Lieutenant Hansel’s heroic attack despite the great odds and his gallant sacrifice, the endangered troops were able to complete their reorganization and rout the enemy from their positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 397 (June 4, 1951)
Home Town: Delaware, Ohio

HARRIS, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William A. Harris, Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Harris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hambung-ni, Korea, n the night of 26 – 27 September 1950. Task Force 777, a regimental combat team, was proceeding on a combat mission when it was ambushed by a hostile force of ten tanks, supported by infantry. The tanks moved directly into the friendly column, firing rapidly, smashing vehicles and equipment and disorganizing the friendly troops. Colonel Harris, realizing the perilous situation of his unit, immediately went toward the head of the column, completely disregarding the intense enemy fire. He quickly evaluated the situation, then personally reorganized his men and led them in a counterattack. Inspired by the dauntless actions of their commander, the men overwhelmed the enemy force, knocked out the ten tanks, destroyed five artillery pieces, and captured twelve enemy trucks. The extraordinary heroism and fearless leadership of Colonel Harris were directly responsible for the annihilation of the enemy force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 512, (July 5, 1951)

*HERNAEZ, PAULINO E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paulino E. Hernaez (US50000470), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Hernaez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yonchon, Korea, on 30 May 1951. On that date, Private Hernaez was acting as leading scout of a platoon whose mission was to break through hostile defenses in an effort to aid two friendly squads that had been encircled by the enemy. As the platoon advanced up a slope, it was subjected to intense fire from four hostile machine-guns and was pinned down. Realizing that his comrades faced annihilation, Private Hernaez quickly made his way to the left flank of the enemy positions and, without hesitation, single-handedly charged the hostile emplacements. Although hit almost immediately by the heavy volume of enemy fire concentrated on him, he continued his charge toward the enemy positions until mortally wounded. His sudden attack distracted the enemy, thereby enabling his comrades to renew their assault. Inspired by the courageous act of Private Hernaez, the friendly troops routed the enemy and successfully completed their mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 746 (October 6, 1951)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

HILL, JOHN GILLESPIE JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Gillespie Hill, Major (Armor), [then Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Major Hill distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 – 27 September 1950. On that night the battalion of which Major Hill was a member was moving rapidly forward in pursuit of hostile troops. Suddenly the column was subjected to a large volume of artillery and automatic weapons fire which pinned it down and inflicted several casualties. Simultaneously, two enemy tanks appeared and, directing murderous cannon and machine-gun fire against the friendly unit, succeeded in dividing it into two parts. Major Hill, with keen tactical perception, hurried up the road until he reached the battalion’s advance party, which he immediately organized into rocket-launcher teams and guided them back to the scene of the battle. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he supervised the emplacement and firing of the rocket launchers while simultaneously throwing grenades and firing his own weapon with deadly accuracy at the foe. Just as one of the hostile tanks was destroyed by the rocket launcher fire, six additional tanks reinforced with hostile troops, greatly increasing the threat to the friendly unit. Major Hill immediately launched an attack on the newly arrived tanks, and directed the fire of his men with great effectiveness until two more tanks were destroyed and the remainder retreated. Inspired by Major Hills’ courageous example, the friendly troops beat off the attack and continued their advance
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 578 (September 25, 1952)
Born: August 9, 1926 at Plattsburgh, New York

*HITCHNER, OMAR T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Omar T. Hitchner (0-291851), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Major Hitchner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Singi, Korea, on 6 September 1950. While inspecting the battalion’s forward position, Major Hitchner noticed that the enemy, having complete domination of terrain and observation, were rendering one section of his defense line untenable through a heavy barrage of well-directed fire. Realizing that in order to continue operations it would be necessary for the unit on his sector to shift position and regain fire superiority, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he personally and unhesitatingly exposed himself to extremely heavy enemy fire in order to draw the attention of the enemy away from his pinned-down unit. To assure that their deployment could be fully accomplished, he remained in his exposed and vulnerable position until he was mortally wounded. Due to this outstanding courage and conspicuous devotion to duty at the supreme sacrifice of his own life, his battalion was able to continue forward to a successful completion of the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 18 (January 12, 1951)
Home Town: Marion, Oregon

*HOPKINS, WILLARD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willard H. Hopkins (RA38518804), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Hopkins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 – 27 September 1950. Shortly after midnight, while the task force was moving northward to link with other United Nations elements, the leading column was suddenly ambushed ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines by a hostile force of ten T-34 tanks supported by infantry. As the enemy tanks opened fire on the column, despite the reigning confusion and trepidation following the surprise, Sergeant First Class Hopkins coolly went into immediate action. Seeing that one tank had penetrated to a vantage point that would bring the entire column under it fire, he, under a continuous rain of machine-gun bullets and flying shrapnel, gathered grenades from his comrades and boldly advanced on the tank. Upon reaching it and finding the hatch open, he quickly mounted the turret and threw eight grenades inside, silencing the crew. Without pausing, Sergeant Hopkins quickly organized a bazooka crew and moved toward the thick of the fighting. When the bazooka rounds were expended, he voluntarily traversed the fire-swept road for additional ammunition. While moving to the rear, he came under the direct assault of a hostile tank that was firing alternately into troops and vehicles as it blasted its way through the friendly position. Once again, armed only with grenades and a rifle, he fearlessly mounted the rear of the moving enemy tank. As he attempted to reach the tank’s turret, a shouted warning from a comrade caused him to leap to a ditch seeking cover as friendly artillery opened direct fire on the tank. The hostile tank returned fire, and in the burst of those shells Sergeant Hopkins was killed.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)
Home Town: Sabine, Louisiana

HUFF, GILMON A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gilmon A. Huff (0-408081), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Huff distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonpou, Korea, on 10 October 1950. On that date, when the battalion was engaged in the mission of attacking across the Yaesong-gang River in an attempt to capture the important city of Paekchan, Colonel Huff accompanied the lead company. Advancing on their objective, the lead company came under intense enemy small-arms fire from three sides which caused it to become disorganized and start falling back. Rallying and reorganizing these scattered troops, Colonel Huff shifted them to flank defenses and ordered a second company to pass through the first and renew the attack. This second company, personally led by Colonel Huff, also came under intense fire and received several banzai charges. Although seriously wounded in repelling a banzai charge, he refused to be evacuated for four hours, but chose to remain and hold his companies together by sheer leadership and his inspiring fearlessness. Not until he had reorganized and instilled his battalion with his courageous determination to such a high degree that they routed the enemy and captured the objective, would Colonel Huff permit himself to be ordered by a medical officer to relinquish his command and be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 52 (February 2, 1951)
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

HUGHES, DAVID R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David R. Hughes, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 7 October 1951. On that date, the company which Lieutenant Hughes commanded was engaged in an assault against a large hostile force occupying a strategic hill. As the battle raged, the enemy, holding commanding positions, hurled countless grenades down the slope toward the friendly troops. This, in conjunction with a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire, was responsible for numerous casualties among the assaulting element. From his command post, Lieutenant Hughes observed that his badly decimated force was in imminent danger of annihilation. Rapidly organizing all of the able-bodied men about him, he moved forward to lead a new attack. Reaching the hard-pressed men, he shouted words of encouragement to them and then single-handedly advanced against the enemy positions. Disregarding the concentrated fire of the foe, he charged to the crest of the hill, fired his automatic weapon until it no longer functioned, and then pressed the attack solely with grenades. His audacious assault completely demoralized the enemy and, as he moved among them fighting fiercely, his men charged up the slope and engaged the hostile troops in close combat. Imbued with his fearlessness, the friendly troops fought their way over the crest of the hill, inflicting heavy casualties on the foe and securing the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 131 (March 6, 1952)

*HUNDLEY, COLEMAN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Coleman C. Hundley (RA13293298), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Hundley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 6 August 1950. On that date, while leading a reconnaissance patrol three miles behind enemy lines, Corporal Hundley ordered his men to take cover in a stone house when they were fired upon. They returned the fire until the enemy began closing in. Corporal Hundley then ordered his patrol to withdraw to higher ground. Although seriously wounded in the action, he covered the withdrawal until each man had reached safety. Corporal Hundley then joined his patrol, reorganized them, and ordered them to return without him. By electing to remain behind to die of his wounds, Corporal Hundley’s extraordinary heroism in action permitted his patrol to withdraw safely.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 129 (October 21, 1950)
Home Town: Henry, Virginia

*HURR, DAVID A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David A. Hurr (RA17268393), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Hurr distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumch’on, Korea, on 1 and 2 August 1950. During the late afternoon of 1 August 1950, Company E, 5th Cavalry Regiment, to which Private Hurr was attached as a gunner, came under furious assault from hordes of enemy Soldiers. In the bitter and intense battle that ensued, he was severely wounded in the stomach by a mortar fragment, but refused evacuation and steadfastly continued to man his heavy machine-gun and deliver devastating fire into the ranks of the stubborn assailants. In the early morning hours of 2 August 1950, when the unit was finally ordered to withdraw in the face of increased and extremely intense hostile fire from this numerically superior enemy force, Private Hurr voluntarily remained at his position to provide protective fire for his comrades during the withdrawal. With indomitable courage and determination, he continued to sweep the assaulting force until his ammunition was expended. When last seen alive, armed with only his rifle, he was delivering deadly accurate fire into the charging foe. When the strongpoint was regained later in the day, his body was found beside his gun, with numerous enemy dead lying in his field of fire. The voluntary and heroic stand he took in the face of utmost peril resulting hi his death enabled his comrades to make an orderly withdrawal and evacuate the wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)
Home Town: Becker, Minnesota

ICKES, CHARLES V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles V. Ickes, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Ickes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 15 August 1950. When the enemy, with overwhelming numbers and firepower, attacked his platoon in an attempt to annihilate it and capture its mortars, Lieutenant Ickes exposed himself to intense enemy automatic weapons fire in order to establish a defense line. Moving from man to man, he assigned them to positions, distributed ammunition, and encouraged them in their assigned tasks. When one flank of the newly established defense line became pinned down and the operator of the machine-gun supporting it was killed, Lieutenant Ickes immediately manned the .50 caliber weapon and eliminated the enemy machine-gun crew. Although his platoon inflicted extremely high casualties on the enemy and halted their envelopment, withdrawal became necessary due to the sheer weight of the enemy’s numbers. During a lull in the battle, Lieutenant Ickes supervised the evacuation of dead and wounded and prepared his men and equipment for an orderly withdrawal. When the unit began to withdraw, he voluntarily elected to remain behind with an automatic rifle to cover their withdrawal. While engaged in this courageous action he was attacked by a banzai charge of approximately thirty enemy and single-handedly repelled the attack, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. By his inspiring leadership, tactical skill, and conspicuous devotion to duty, he enabled his platoon and its support weapons to be saved form a dangerous situation without undue loses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950)

JAMES, TYLEE N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Tylee N. James, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant James distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Turengi, Korea, on 26 January 1951. On that date, when Company A was given the mission of attacking and securing Hill 256, Lieutenant James observed that the enemy had concentrated intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire on the only approach to the hill. Although the hostile force was well dug in and awaiting the attack with fixed bayonets, Lieutenant James, without regard for his personal safety, volunteered to lead his platoon in an assault on the objective. The distance between the platoon’s position and the enemy position was approximately thirty-five yards and the intervening area was covered by intense mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire. As Lieutenant James led his platoon through the deadly hail of fire, the unit suffered a large number of casualties; however, his aggressive leadership and personal bravery so inspired the remaining members of the platoon that they stormed the hill, killing and wounding numerous hostile troops. Through the gallant and inspiring leadership of Lieutenant James, the enemy force was completely routed and Hill 256 secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 394 (June 3, 1951)

JENKINS, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James B. Jenkins (RA14313612), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Jenkins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Shindo, Korea, on 14 September 1950. When his company’s attack on a heavily fortified enemy hill position was suddenly halted by an extremely heavy and accurate mortar barrage, a platoon of tanks was sent forward to give support. Realizing that the tanks would be unable to observe the enemy and their concealed emplacements, Corporal Jenkins abandoned all cover and moved through the intense enemy fire to an open field where the tanks had taken up position. Then, with the use of the external tank phone, he proceeded to direct the fire of the tank. As the tanks moved forward, he – alone and exposed – remained but a few feet behind the lead tank, and totally disregarding the hail of enemy mortar fire that was falling around him, continued to give directions and point out enemy emplacements until the near miss of a mortar shell knocked him unconscious. Upon regaining consciousness, he still refused to abandon his vulnerable position, fearlessly resumed carrying out his self-appointed mission. Through his outstanding courage and aggressive action against overwhelming odds, Corporal Jenkins was directly responsible for the complete annihilation of an enemy strongpoint and the successful occupation of his unit’s objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 79 (February 17, 1951)
Home Town: Halifax, North Carolina

JENSEN, RAYMOND A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond A. Jensen (0-971104), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Jensen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nago-ri, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date, a friendly force was in the fourth day of an attack against a well-entrenched hostile force. The repeated assaults against the enemy emplacement had seriously decimated Lieutenant Jensen’s platoon. Left with only ten men, he decided to lead them in a final attack. Charging up the hill, the friendly troops were immediately met by a devastating volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Constantly exposing himself in order to encourage his men, he urged them forward. Although painfully wounded in the leg, he located an enemy bunker and, standing in full view of the enemy, neutralized it with grenades. Upon receiving the order to withdraw, he again exposed himself in order to draw the hostile fire. This action enabled his men to reach cover. Wounded again by shrapnel, he steadfastly remained in his position, destroying another hostile emplacement with grenades. Weak from loss of blood, he collapsed on the slope but he summoned enough strength to shout to his men to withdraw without him. However, his courageous actions so inspired his men that they moved to his position and carried him down the hill to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1034 (December 30, 1951)
Home Town: San Diego, California

JOHNSON, HAROLD K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold K. Johnson, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tabu-dong, Korea, on 4 September 1950. When his battalion had been forced to withdraw from their hill position by a series of fierce attacks by an overwhelming number of the enemy, Colonel Johnson immediately directed a counterattack in an attempt to regain the vitally important dominating terrain. Placing himself with the most forward elements in order to more effectively direct and coordinate the attack, Colonel Johnson rallied his men and led them forward. Moving about exposed to the heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small-arms fire, he directed fire, assigned positions and, by personal example, proved the necessary incentive to stimulate and keep the attack moving. When his battalion began to falter due to the devastating enemy fire, Colonel Johnson moved forward to close proximity of the enemy to establish and personally operate a forward observation post. Remaining in this exposed position, he directed effective mortar counter fire against the enemy. When his mortars became inoperable and his casualties very heavy due to the tremendous firepower and numerically superior enemy forces, he realized the necessity for withdrawal. Remaining in the position until the last unit had withdrawn, he directed the salvaging of both weapons and equipment. Reestablishing a new defensive position, he reorganized his battalion and supervised medical attention and evacuation of the wounded. His conspicuous devotion to duty and selfless conduct under enemy fire provided an inspiring example to his men and prevented a serious penetration of friendly lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 52 (February 2, 1951)
Born: February 22, 1912 at Bowesmont, North Dakota
Home Town: Grafton, North Dakota

*JOHNSON, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James B. Johnson (0-1335426), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup’a-ri, Korea, on 6 September 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Johnson led his platoon across the Imjin River under an extremely heavy enemy mortar and artillery barrage in an effort to relieve Company K, which had been subjected to fierce enemy attacks for several hours. Making his way to the company’s defensive area, Lieutenant Johnson quickly deployed his men to protect a flank of the perimeter. Almost immediately, the platoon was attacked by the enemy but, despite the intense hostile artillery, mortar and automatic-weapons fire, the men successfully defended their sector, repulsing the enemy with heavy casualties. After this attack, Lieutenant Johnson led his men in an assault against an enemy-held ridge line, but a heavy volume of hostile fire forced a withdrawal. Although painfully wounded, Lieutenant Johnson reorganized his men and led them in a second assault against the hostile positions. During this assault, he was again wounded when he courageously shielded one of his men from an exploding grenade. Undaunted, Lieutenant Johnson continued to lead the advance until mortally wounded by mortar fragments. His heroic actions so inspired his men that the ridge line was subsequently captured from a vastly superior number of hostile troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 768 (October 14, 1951)
Home Town: Okfuskee, Oklahoma

JONES, WAYNE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wayne D. Jones, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Jones distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mago- ri, Korea On that date, Company L was engaged in an attack against a hostile force, firmly entrenched in hill positions. As the company moved forward, it was subjected to a heavy volume of fire from the enemy elements and the attack began to falter. Observing this, Lieutenant Jones, without regard for his personal safety, moved to the advance elements and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, charged directly into the devastating enemy fire. Firing a captured enemy sub-machine gun, Lieutenant Jones single-handedly assaulted two bunkers from which most of the enemy fire originated. Completely demoralized by Lieutenant Jones’ fearless attack, the enemy force withdrew in disorder, leaving fourteen dead in the two bunkers. Inspired by the bravery and personal courage displayed by Lieutenant Jones, the friendly troops renewed their assault, and closing with the enemy in fierce hand-to-hand combat, routing them from the objective with extremely heavy casualties. After he had personally placed his men in the most advantageous defensive positions to guard against an enemy counterattack, Lieutenant Jones then personally supervised the evacuation of the wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 990 (December 14, 1951)
Born: March 11, 1924 at Newton, Illinois
Home Town: Newton, Illinois

LITZINGER, DUANE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Private First Class Duane E. Litzinger, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Litzinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mago-ri, Korea, on 11 and 12 October 1951. On that date, Private Litzinger’s company was engaged in an assault against well-fortified enemy emplacements. In the opening phases of the attack, Private Litzinger was assigned to provide overhead machine-gun fire to support the attacking infantry. The heavy enemy counter-fire soon disabled his weapon and wounded two of his comrades. Exposing himself to the direct observation of the enemy, he fearlessly moved to the two men and evacuated them to safety. Upon returning to the battle Private Litzinger, armed only with his carbine, single-handedly advanced against a hostile automatic-weapon emplacement and killed the crew manning the machine gun. Later, when another attack was launched by the friendly troops, Private Litzinger, observing that his comrades were pinned down by intense enemy automatic-weapons fire, organized five men and led them against the hostile bunkers. Working their way to within a few yards of the enemy positions, the men assaulted the emplacements with grenades under the direction of Private Litzinger and destroyed three of them. With the enemy automatic-weapons silenced, the friendly troops were able to renew their assault and secure their objective. The platoon was immediately arranged in a defense perimeter, with Private Litzinger and two comrades in a forward position. When the fanatical enemy counterattack came, Private Litzinger’s emplacement bore the brunt of the assault. Fighting fiercely and with great determination, he held his ground, repulsing the enemy with extremely heavy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1003 (December 20, 1951)

LOVISKA, FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francis Loviska, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery B, 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Loviska distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yong-dong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. While serving as a forward artillery observer attached to Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, Private Loviska and his comrades were cut off behind enemy lines by a machine-gun, pinning the unit to the ground. Private Loviska volunteered to carry ammunition for a bazooka team which was seeking to destroy the machine-gun position, constituting a part of the road block. Moving forward of an infantry platoon position, the team fired upon the road block and knocked out three machine-guns. Before it could deliver more fire, the bazooka team, except for Private Loviska, was killed. He immediately picked up the bazooka and single-handedly destroyed two more machine-gun positions, enabling his unit to withdraw without further opposition.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 114 (March 4, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 212 (1951)

LYNCH, JAMES H.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Lynch, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Lynch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 21 and 22 September 1950. As commander of Task Force LYNCH, Colonel Lynch was assigned the mission of organizing, coordinating, and directing the tactical operations of a task force to drive through enemy territory to a junction with Allied Forces near Seoul. Though faced by a confident enemy flush from recent victories, Colonel Lynch so skillfully maneuvered and employed his force that he confused and completely demoralized an enemy who had tremendous numerical superiority. Inspired by his courage and aggressive leadership, the men of Task Force LYNCH, in their drive northward, annihilated over nine hundred enemy troops and destroyed great quantities of enemy weapons, vehicles, and ordnance stores.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 189 (December 5, 1950)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

LYNCH, JAMES H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Lynch, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Lynch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hambung-ni, Korea, on 27 September 1950. As Colonel Lynch’s task force moved forward deeper into enemy territory, the motorized column suddenly was intercepted and brought under fire by an enemy force of ten tanks. Having no friendly tanks at his immediate disposal, and realizing that the enemy tanks, if unopposed, would bring about the annihilation of his command, Colonel Lynch, with total disregard for his personal safety, moved forward to effect the reorganization of his then scattered and confused force. Despite the devastating lane of enemy tank and machine-gun fire that was placed on the highway, he directed the placing of a two and a half ton truck across the road as a temporary road block, thus sufficiently retarding the advance of the enemy to allow friendly tanks to move forward from the rear guard position. During the vicious tank battle that ensued, he refused to take cover and moving about openly, organized rocket launcher teams and placed them in position. Through his courageous, aggressive action and superior leadership Lieutenant Colonel Lynch was directly responsible for the total annihilation of an overwhelming enemy force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 132 (March 11, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

*MATTA, ELMY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elmy L. Matta (0-38339), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Matta distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 3 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Matta was assigned mission of destroying an enemy road block which had cut the Division supply route and personally led the assault of his company against the enemy in the face of intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. Even after expending all his ammunition, Lieutenant Matta pressed the attack with his bayonet, causing the enemy to bolt and run. During this action Lieutenant Matta was killed. His fearlessness and aggressive leadership inspired his company to eliminate the enemy and successfully complete the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 46 (August 31, 1950)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

*MAYO, GREEN BERRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Green Berry Mayo (0-962708), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Mayo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Omaegok, Korea, on 29 January 1951. While Lieutenant Mayo’s platoon was participating in an attack against a well fortified and determined enemy force on Hill 312, it was suddenly subjected to intense and accurate fire from two enemy machine-gun emplacements, forcing the men to take advantage of the little cover available to them on the side of the hill. Lieutenant Mayo immediately realized that it would be impossible to withdraw without suffering heavy casualties and yet, to remain in their present position would subject the men to threat of annihilation from grenades rolled down the slope by the enemy. Instructing his men to stay under cover, he scrambled from his position and moved forward to assault the enemy emplacements. Single-handedly. Charging directly into the heavy fire, he began to throw grenades rapidly at all of the enemy strongpoints visible to him. As he drew closer to the enemy positions, the hostile troops rolled numerous grenades into his path, one of which exploded and fatally wounded him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 620 (August 6, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 633 (August 12, 1951) to correct his service number.
Home Town: Worth, Georgia

McKIM, JOHN S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John S. McKim, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant McKim distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kyongan-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, the defensive positions occupied by Lieutenant McKims’ platoon were attacked by approximately seventy-five enemy troops. As the hostile force overran the 57-mm. recoilless rifle section, he realized that this assault posed a serious threat to the key terrain feature occupied by his unit which, in addition, was an important sector in the battalion’s defense. He immediately rushed forward under intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire, set up a 60- mm. mortar in an exposed position directly on the skyline, and fired at the hostile troops in an effort to stem their attack. When his ammunition was exhausted, he stood erect, completely exposed to the enemy, and began hurling grenades at them. Throughout this action he shouted directions and words of encouragement to his men who, inspired by his great example of personal courage, fought fiercely to repulse the enemy. Through his determined efforts, the hostile force was repelled with heavy casualties and the vital positions were held. The gallantry and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant McKim on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and uphold the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 784 (October 19, 1951)

*McKIM, ROBERT BOYCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Boyce McKim (RA15243413), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class McKim distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 9 August 1950. As his platoon was attacking a heavily defended enemy position it suddenly came under the cross fire of two enemy machine-guns and was forced to take cover. Realizing that the attack could not continue until the enemy machine-guns were eliminated, Private McKim, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, seized his automatic rifle and charged toward the enemy positions. Disregarding the hail of enemy fire directed at him, Private McKim, moving to within a few feet of one of the enemy guns, opened fire and destroyed it. Turning his attention to the remaining machine-gun, Private McKim, moved directly towards its dug-in position, and through devastating fire, continued his one-man assault. At this point he was wounded in the leg, but refusing to give in, dropping to his knees, he continued delivering effective fire upon the enemy until he was killed by another burst from the enemy machine-gun. Through his inspiring example of courageous action at the sacrifice of his own life, Private McKim contributed materially to the successful completion of his unit’s mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 39 (January 23, 1951)
Home Town: Howard, Indiana

*McLAUGHLIN, PAUL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul J. McLaughlin (RA16296071), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Tank-Infantry Task Force, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class McLaughlin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kiokso-ri, Korea, on 15 February 1951. Private First Class McLaughlin’s Tank-Infantry Task Force had the mission of breaking through the enemy lines in an effort to relieve a beleaguered friendly unit. With the infantrymen riding the tanks, the task force advanced through a narrow draw and was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from enemy emplacements located on both sides of the road. The men were soon forced to abandon the tanks because of the intense fire and take up positions along the road. Private McLaughlin observed one of his comrades fall to the ground, seriously wounded. With a complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved across the fire-swept terrain in an effort to aid him. After carrying the wounded man to the safety of a ditch, he made his way back to the tank and secured ammunition for a friendly machine-gun position. As he made his way across an exposed paddy with the heavy boxes of ammunition, he was wounded in both legs by enemy fire. Undaunted, he crawled to the machine-gun emplacement, dragging the ammunition behind him. Private McLaughlin then took up a position to protect the machine-gunner with rifle fire but, weak from loss of blood, he collapsed. Upon regaining consciousness, he realized that the situation had become desperate and so, ordering the friendly troops about him to withdraw with the wounded, he crawled to the machine-gun and began firing at the on- rushing enemy with deadly accuracy. He was still firing the weapon when his position was overrun by the enemy and he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1002 (December 20, 1951)
Home Town: Sanilac, Michigan

*MILLER, JOHNNY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnny J. Miller (RA16314225), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Miller distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, Seventh Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill, preceded by a heavy artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Sergeant Miller, section sergeant of the machine-gun section attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained in position delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his gun emplacement was overrun, then began throwing grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Sergeant Miller was found dead beside his machine-gun and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 458 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Marshall, Indiana

MINNICK, EDWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward W. Minnick (RA35005105), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Minnick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 10 and 12 September 1950. After successfully attacking an enemy held hill, Sergeant Minnick, realizing that the enemy would soon counterattack, established his platoon defenses. When the contemplated attack finally came, his platoon, although vastly outnumbered, refused to give ground and for over two hours fought with the enemy, who at times approached to within twenty yards of friendly positions. Attack after attack was repulsed until the ammunition supply was exhausted, but even then Sergeant Minnick, setting an inspiring example for his men to follow, closed with the enemy with his bare fists. Although wounded six times during the ensuing action, bleeding profusely and weak from loss of blood, he refused to allow himself or his platoon to withdraw until he was ordered to do so by a senior officer. Even then, he elected to remain behind until he was certain that all the other wounded had been evacuated. Through his outstanding courage and inspiring leadership, he was able to keep his platoon completely organized and to withdraw with minimum of loss while at the same time inflicting extremely heavy casualties upon the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951)
Home Town: New York, New York

*MITCHELL, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John H. Mitchell (RA20212607), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Mitchell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. While engaged in an attack on the strategic enemy position on Hill 314, Master Sergeant Mitchell’s platoon began to falter under the deadly hail of enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire directed at them. With a display of extreme courage and selflessness, Sergeant Mitchell moved about in the intense enemy fire to assign positions and encourage and urge his men forward in the attack. His dauntless leadership under enemy fire provided an inspiring example to his men and stimulated them in the assault. Near the top of the hill, Sergeant Mitchell was seriously wounded in the chest by small-arms fire, but despite great pain and loss of blood, he continued to lead his platoon forward until the enemy, with heavy losses, was driven from the top of the hill. Not until the objective was completely secured could he be persuaded to seek medical aid. As Sergeant Mitchell started to leave the hilltop, he lost his life in an enemy mortar barrage, which suddenly struck the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 37 (January 22, 1951)
Home Town: Kenosha, Wisconsin

MOORE, HOWARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard M. Moore, Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while commanding Battery C, 61st Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pakchon, Korea, on 5 November 1950. On that date, Captain Moore’s battery had moved into a new position to provide supporting fire for the withdrawal of a friendly brigade when a numerically superior enemy force attacked the new position in an attempt to cut off the route of withdrawal. Although subjected to intense fire from the enemy, who occupied commanding terrain, Captain Moore, realizing the importance of repulsing the attack, moved among his men, organizing them and supervising their defensive actions. During the ensuring engagement he repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire to direct return fire. His courageous leadership was an incentive to his men who fought willingly and valiantly against tremendous odds. When enemy troops were storming his position, Captain Moore ordered 105-mm. howitzers to be brought into action and used as direct fire weapons. His selfless devotion to duty and inspiring leadership were directly responsible for the success of the battery in repulsing the enemy attack and protecting the only route of withdrawal for the friendly brigade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 508 (July 4, 1951)

*NICHOLS, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Nichols (RA13165264), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Nichols distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Waegwan, Korea, on 18 September 1950. During a company attack against a hill heavily defended by intense enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire, Corporal Nichols observed his platoon commander approaching, unknowingly, into the fire of a hostile machine-gun approximately fifty yards away. He shouted a warning, but it was lost in the noise of battle. Acting without hesitation and well aware of the personal risk involved, Corporal Nichols hurled himself between his platoon commander and the point- blank machine-gun fire, absorbing with his own body the bullets aimed at the officer. During this noble selfless act, he suffered critical wounds that resulted in his death.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (April 4, 1951)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

NONNWEILER, EDWARD PHILIP
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward Philip Nonnweiler (RA16307361), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Nonnweiler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Ma-dong, Korea on 13 August 1950. In the course of a sneak attack on his unit’s position, Sergeant Nonnweiler spotted the enemy and shouted a warning to his comrades. He immediately moved forward and placed into action a 75-mm. recoilless rifle on the exposed slopes of the hill in complete view of the enemy, firing the weapon as fast as it could be loaded. With complete disregard for his own safety he deliberately diverted the heavy enemy fire on himself, thus enabling his comrades to place themselves in a more advantageous firing position. The mortar crews were able to divert their fire from another target and place the full force of the mortar fire to their unit’s front. Sergeant Nonnweiler was hit by a burst of machine-gun fire, but despite serious wounds and with his right arm useless, he managed to load and fire the weapon into the charging enemy’s midst, until twice again he was wounded leaving him in such pain that he had to crawl from his position to seek safety where his wounds could be treated. His selfless courage and conspicuous devotion to duty saved his unit from possible annihilation by the overwhelming enemy force. The extraordinary heroism of Sergeant Nonnweiler reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 74 (February 15, 1951)
Home Town: Sheboygan, Wisconsin

PACHECO, ROBERTO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roberto Pacheco, Jr. (AKA: Roberto Siqueiros-Gamez, Jr.) (RA19330456), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Pacheco distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Saradong, Korea, on 9 August 1950. In the course of an attack on an enemy-held hill, Private First Class Pacheco’s platoon was pinned down by murderous a murderous hail of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Upon receiving word from one of his comrades that his platoon leader had been wounded, Corporal Pacheco took the initiative and charged up the forward slopes in the face of intense enemy fire. Upon reaching high ground, he paused momentarily to survey an enemy position to his front. Upon spotting a number of the enemy, he lobbed grenades and fired his automatic weapon into their midst. The enemy became so surprised and bewildered by this one-man onslaught that they left their positions and fled in panic. Taking full advantage of their rout, Corporal Pacheco charged on the retreating enemy, firing his weapon on the run. Single-handedly the hill was wrested and secured for the platoon to occupy. In this outstanding display of aggressiveness and courage, Private First Class Pacheco personally accounted for at least thirty of the enemy dead and was solely responsible in causing the withdraw of the remainder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 42 (January 26, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California
Roberto Pacheco’s Distinguished Service Cross was awarded under that assumed name. He was subsequently killed in action on February 10, 1951, at which time his Family acknowledged his true identity.

*POSTLETHWAIT, CLARENCE EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence Eugene Postlethwait (RA06898582), Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a medical aidman with Company C, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Postlethwait distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Unsan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. On that date, the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) was completely surrounded and contained in a small defense perimeter in an open field and pinned down by heavy concentrations of enemy automatic small-arms fire. There were approximately 125 American wounded within the defense perimeter who had received no medical attention due to the fact that all medical supplies were aboard a truck which had to be abandoned during the preceding night’s furious engagement and which was located at an exposed point approximately 75 yards outside the defense perimeter, in full view of the enemy. Sergeant First Class Postlethwait fearlessly volunteered to attempt to reach the truck and bring back medications and bandages to enable the battalion surgeon to render emergency treatment to the wounded. With utter disregard for his own safety, he left the comparative cover of the defense perimeter, made his way to the truck amidst bursts of fire from enemy snipers, and collected the necessary medical supplies. He had all but arrived back at the defense perimeter when he was mortally wounded by fragments from enemy grenades.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 51 (November 29, 1956)
Home Town: Erie, Pennsylvania

RADICE, MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael Radice (RA12276936), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Radice distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 10 May 1951. On that date, Company E was assigned the mission of securing commanding terrain approximately 5000 yards north of Uijongbu. As Private Radice and his platoon moved up a steep, rocky slope to attack bitterly defended enemy positions, they were pinned down by heavy machine-gunfire halting their advance. Private Radice, realizing that drastic action was required, began to crawl and dodge from rock to rock, edging toward the enemy foxholes near the summit. Accurately throwing grenades and aggressively assaulting one position after another, he destroyed three separate strongpoints, each containing three hostile riflemen. Despite a withering hail of bullets, Private Radice inched father up the fire-swept incline and was wounded in the right arm while silencing two machine-gun positions. Although bleeding profusely from his wound, he grabbed several abandoned enemy grenades and continued his lone attack on two dugouts, killing four riflemen. Fearlessly proceeding toward a mortar position, which was delivering crippling fire on the company command post, he neutralized a mortar position and its crew. Although seriously weakened by excessive loss of blood, Private Radice reached an exposed area where he rescued a wounded comrade, moving him to a place of comparative safety and refusing medical aid until the man had been treated.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 195 (July 28, 1951)
Home Town: Mercer, New Jersey

RECTOR, EDWARD G. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward G. Rector (RA16263945), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Rector distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. When his 4.2 mortar platoon was threatened by a machine-gun supported enemy force numbering about twenty-five, Sergeant Rector attacked the force alone. To reach the enemy, he charged fifty yards uphill in the face of intense fire from the enemy machine-gun. Arriving at the enemy position, he destroyed the machine-gun crew and inflicted heavy casualties upon the other enemy Soldiers in the area, forcing the survivors to withdraw. He continued his harassing attack until his ammunition was exhausted.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Van Buren, Michigan

*REDDICK, BILLY F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Billy F. Reddick (RA18358022), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Reddick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nago-ri, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date the platoon of which Corporal Reddick was a member was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a strategic hill from a large hostile force. As the friendly troops advanced up the precipitous slope, they were subjected to a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire which forced them to halt their attack and seek cover. Locating the position from which the major portion of the hostile fire originated, Corporal Reddick, without regard for his personal safety, moved forward over the fire-swept terrain. Upon reaching a position a few yards from the enemy emplacement, he threw several grenades inside. Then, fixing his bayonet, he leaped within the bunker and engaged the hostile troops occupying it in hand-to- hand combat. Fighting fiercely, Corporal Reddick single-handedly killed seven of the enemy and neutralizing the bunker. Inspired by his fearlessness, the friendly troops renewed their advance and, as they advanced, Corporal Reddick took charge of an automatic-rifle team. Leading his men directly toward the objective, he directed their fire with great skill until he was hit and killed by hostile fire. His courage and devotion to duty were instrumental in the success achieved by his platoon in seizing its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 163 (March 26, 1952)
Home Town: Richland, Louisiana

ROBERTS, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Roberts (RA15259546), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonchon, Korea, on 8 June 1951. As Company G, the right company of a battalion attack against Hill 541, was attacking in a column of platoons along the top of a ridgeline which led into the final objective, its leading platoon was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire from the enemy dug in on one of the main knobs astride the company’s route of advance. Completely disorganized, the leading platoon started to fall back. Sergeant Roberts’ platoon, which was next in the column, attempted to deploy and return the enemy’s fire. Sergeant Roberts gave up his rifle to an assistant, seized an abandoned light machine-gun and a full belt of ammunition. Throwing the loose end of the ammunition belt over his shoulder, he sprang to his feet, and in complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward and up the knoll. Firing the machine-gun from his hip, he ignored the enemy fire directed at him and a flesh wound which he sustained. Yelling at the top of his voice, and keeping a steady volume of fire directed at the enemy, he pressed forward. As he neared the top of the knoll, the enemy under this onslaught abandoned their position and retired The men of company G who witnessed this one-man assault, were so inspired that they moved forward and joined Sergeant Roberts in the final assault as he reached the top of the knoll.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 7 (February 24, 1956)
Home Town: Summit, Ohio

*ROBERTS, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert S. Roberts (0-60192), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving commanding a rifle platoon of Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokchong-Myon, Korea, from 1 to 5 September 1950. During this period First Lieutenant Roberts’ platoon had the mission of holding an important position between two battalions. This position was subjected to continual attacks by the numerically superior enemy who attempted to use it as a main route of infiltration. During the day, enemy mortar and artillery fire were concentrated on the small area, and after darkness, Lieutenant Roberts and his men were repeatedly subjected to fanatical attacks by hostile troops. Despite the tremendous odds, Lieutenant Roberts valiantly directed the defensive actions of his platoon and repelled the attacks, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. When ammunition ran low and the supply from the rear was cut off, Lieutenant Roberts crawled forward and stripped the enemy dead of rifles, ammunition and grenades for use against future banzai thrusts. On the night of 5 September 1950, the battered platoon was attacked by an overwhelming enemy force and in the ensuing action Lieutenant Roberts was mortally wounded while directing the fire of his men. However, as a result of his gallant and intrepid leadership, enormous casualties were inflicted on the enemy and when the platoon withdrew, more than one hundred and forty enemy dead littered three sides of the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 510 (July 4, 1951)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

ROBINSON, LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leroy Robinson (RA34284673), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Robinson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Igok-tong, Korea, on 11 September 1950. On that date, Company G was assigned the mission of defending a strategic hill near Igok-tong. When the enemy launched a fierce attack against the left flank of the company, several positions were overrun and others on the verge of collapsing, thus endangering the entire line. Sergeant Robinson, observing this disastrous turn of events, left his unit’s position and moved through the withering hail of fire to the left flank area. Quickly and aggressively moving among the fire-swept positions, Sergeant Robinson assumed command of the scattered, disorganized men and reformed them in a defense line. For several hours of bitter close combat, he displayed superb leadership and bravery in directing the fire of his men, advantageously re-deploying them and exhorting them to greater effort. After finally beating back the enemy assaults, Sergeant Robinson boldly decided to counterattack. When he defiantly led his men in a charge against the numerically superior hostile force, the enemy troops, dismayed at their inability to penetrate the stubborn defense line, became confused and bewildered, and fled in wild disorder. Although he was painfully wounded during this action, Sergeant Robinson valiantly fought the enemy until the last hostile Soldier had retreated. As a result of his quick thinking and aggressive action, the crumbling defense of his company was organized into a bulwark of resistance that successfully thwarted the enemy’s desperate attempt to secure the strategically vital hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 400 (June 5, 1951)
Home Town: Appling, Georgia

*RODSTROM, DONALD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald E. Rodstrom (RA18099417), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with as a Medical Aidman attached to an Infantry Company of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Rodstrom distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. Corporal Rodstrom was an aidman to an infantry company attacking a heavily defended and fortified enemy position when it came under a barrage of extremely heavy enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire and was forced to seek cover. Seeing a comrade lying wounded in an open area in full view of the enemy and completely exposed to their devastating fire, Corporal Rodstrom, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, left his position of cover and moved forward to render emergency medial treatment. Disregarding the hail of enemy fire that was directed at him, and though in a position that offered no cover whatsoever, Corporal Rodstrom continued to aid his comrade until he himself was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 37 (January 22, 1951)
Home Town: Dallas, Texas

SANDERFORD, HOMER E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Homer E. Sanderford, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Sanderford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 21 September 1950. Corporal Sanderford’s company was engaged in an attack in an attempt to seize vital high ground and encountered heavy enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire and was pinned down. Despite the heavy volume of enemy fire and with an additional hazard form overhead supporting fire from friendly troops, he voluntarily and without regard for his own personal safety, rose to his feet and began to advance aggressively on the enemy. When he made his way about 150 yards, he began to throw grenades at the enemy, continuing this until he exhausted his supply. He then commenced firing on the enemy with his rifle until he also exhausted his ammunition. Withdrawing and replenishing his supplies four times, he repeatedly and heroically assaulted the enemy position. When his comrades, inspired by his fearlessness and enabled by the confusion caused in the enemy ranks, overran the enemy position a total of seventeen enemy dead were counted in the area of his single- handed assaults.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 79 (February 17, 1951)

*SCHIERMAN, THEODORE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Theodore A. Schierman (RA39482804), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Schierman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tuksong-dong, Korea, on 10 August 1950. Sergeant First Class Schierman was in command of a combat patrol en-route to establish an outpost when it was pinned down by a hail of deadly semi-automatic and automatic- weapons fire. Realizing that the lives of the men in his patrol were in danger, Sergeant Schierman, without thought of his own personal safety, moved through the enemy fire to a new position. From there he deliberately laid a heavy volume of fire on the enemy in order to draw all of their fire on his position. This selfless act enabled his comrades to withdraw to safety. Artillery was called for and directed on the enemy position, neutralizing their fire. Sergeant Schierman then regrouped his patrol and again led his comrades into enemy territory. Once more the patrol was pinned down, this time by fire from an anti-tank gun. Courageously, he maneuvered to a position from which he single-handedly destroyed the anti-tank gun, permitting him to move forward with his patrol and accomplish his mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 113 (March 4, 1951)
Home Town: Whitman, Washington
Killed in action on 15 August 1950

SHELL, BUSTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Buster Shell (RA14323453), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Shell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hukkyo- ri, Korea, on 18 October 1950. An infantry company, attacking the high ground along the main highway leading into the North Korean capitol of Pyongyang, was halted by a heavy concentration of flat trajectory fire from concealed enemy positions. This enemy fire was becoming increasingly effective, and every effort was being made to find the source. Private Shell suddenly shouted that he had discovered the location and that the fire was from two enemy tanks. Disregarding his own safety, he voluntarily moved forward, armed only with a loaded rocket launcher, into the enemy fire to within fifty yards of the first enemy tank and destroyed it with his only rocket. He then returned to his original position, reloaded his launcher, and fearlessly moved up until he was within point-blank range of the second tank, and then destroyed it. His extreme courage and outstanding devotion to duty at great risk to his own life broke up an enemy roadblock and enabled his company continue their attack on Pyongyang.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950)
Home Town: Carter, Tennessee

*SMITH, REGINALD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Reginald D. Smith (US55024532), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Onnamu-go, Korea, on 8 October 1951. When his platoon came under withering cross-fire from strongly fortified positions, Private Smith moved boldly forward, hurled grenades into an enemy emplacement, and wiped out a machine-gun crew, thereby enabling his unit to move forward. While nearing a second bunker, the valiant group was pinned down by intense enemy fire. Private Smith crept up the fire-swept hill, lobbed two grenades with deadly accuracy, and poured rifle fire into the position, killing all occupants. Although painfully wounded by a mortar burst, he continued forward until hostile fire reached such intensity that his unit was ordered to move back. He voluntarily remained in position, covering the retrograde movement. As he withdrew, he observed his platoon leader wounded and unable to move. He promptly administered first aid and began the slow, tortuous evacuation, crawling toward friendly lines. During this action, both men were mortally wounded by mortar fire.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 106 (November 28, 1952)
Home Town: Kent, Michigan

SWING, WILLARD V., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willard V. Swing, Jr. (RA16301390), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Swing distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Madong, Korea, on 13 August 1950. On that date, the mortar platoon of which Private First Class Swing was a member came under devastating attacks by overwhelmingly numerically superior enemy forces and was forced to withdraw to new positions. In the hurried withdrawal to more tenable positions, the mortar ammunition, sorely needed by the mortar crews, was left behind in a trailer directly in the path of the advancing enemy forces. Realizing the helpless condition adjacent friendly forces would be in if their mortar support fire was withdrawn, Private Swing voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own safety, left his position of comparative safety and ran through the deadly hail of enemy machine-gun and small arms fire the trailer containing the ammunition. Upon his arrival, he noticed that increments of a number of mortar rounds in the trailer had been ignited by enemy fire and were in danger of exploding. Removing them, he pulled the trailer back to mortar positions and re-supplied the mortar crews. When he was wounded by a mortar shell landing a few feet away, Corporal Swing refused to be evacuated and, seizing his rifle, continued to fire at the advancing enemy until all his ammunition was expended, and then moved forward to drag several wounded comrades to cover. Despite the intense pain from his wounds, he remained in the enemy fire to care for the wounded and load rifle and carbine clips for his comrades until he was forcibly moved from the front lines. His selfless courage, aggressiveness and conspicuous devotion to duty in the face of grave danger was an inspiration to his entire company, saved many lives, and led to the successful repulse of the enemy attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 42 (January 26, 1951)
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

*SWINNEY, CLARICE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarice C. Swinney (RA18335761), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Swinney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, 7th Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill preceded by a heavy artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent that the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Private Swinney, a machine-gunner attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained at his gun delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his position was overrun, then began throwing hand grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Private Swinney was found dead beside his machine gun and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 461 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Tarrant, Texas

*WAGNER, BURTON ALES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Burton Ales Wagner (RA16242452), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wagner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yopo-ri, North Korea, on 2 December 1950. Given the mission of providing security for a crew from his company in the process of building a bridge across the Taedong River, Sergeant First Class Wagner was checking his positions for maximum defense when suddenly attacked by Chinese Communist troops apparently intent on sweeping through his line of resistance and destroying the bridgehead. He courageously moved forward alone to engage and sufficiently delay the foe in order that the members of the crew might be alerted against surprise attack. Armed only with a carbine, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy observation and action and delivered a deadly accurate fire into the advancing hostile force until his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Wagner’s magnificent stand alerted the company and enabled the men to contain the enemy attack and save the bridgehead.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Stephenson, Illinois

*WALKER, ROBERT BENJAMIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Benjamin Walker (0-39384), Captain (Cavalry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Walker distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. Cavalry Regiment, First Cavalry Division, on 12 September 1950. When his company was pinned down by heavy enemy fire during an attack on stubbornly held Hill 314, it was viciously counterattacked by North Korean troops who inflicted heavy casualties. With utter disregard for his safety, Captain Walker charged forward into a veritable hail of enemy fire, shooting his carbine and exhorting his men to follow him. His company, inspired by their commander’s courage, moved forward, aggressively following him in the vicious and bloody assault, engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, and pursued the foes down the mountain until halted by Captain Walker. On 24 September 1950, while leading a reinforced platoon on patrol through enemy-infested territory in the vicinity of Sangju, his patrol suddenly receive heavy automatic fire from enemy entrenched in a rice paddy. While the troops were deploying to return the fire, they were fired on from the rear by an enemy group that had been by-passed in the aggressive advance. Captain Walker was seriously wounded, but he voluntarily exposed himself to draw fire in his direct, thus enabling his men to take cover, locate the enemy and annihilate them. During this fierce fight he was fatally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Born: September 11, 1918 at Grant, Wisconsin
Home Town: Madison, Wisconsin

WEBEL, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James B. Webel, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Operations Officer of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Webel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 – 27 September 1950. As the leading elements of the task force entered the sleeping village of Hambung-ni, ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines, they were suddenly ambushed by a force of ten hostile T-34 tanks supported by foot troops. When the rapidly firing enemy tanks smashed the column, the outnumbered and outgunned men withdrew to the flanks to make their stand. As the ensuing battle raged fiercely in and near the village, Captain Webel, realizing that drastic action would be necessary to save the column, stepped out to destroy the leading tank. Suddenly swerving and almost overrunning its daring adversary, the enemy tank averted Captain Webel’s attempt to climb aboard to drop grenades through an open periscope slot. Continuing to smash through the column, the tank swung off the road and into a rice field, gaining a more advantageous firing position. In the meantime, Captain Webel moved swiftly to a point opposite the tank’s new location. Seeing the ineffectiveness of a group of men attempting to put the tank completely out of action by throwing grenades into an open hatch, he seized a five-gallon can of gasoline from the nearest vehicle, ran to the side of the tank, and after a comrade had failed to set fire to it by dashing gasoline on its sides, he climbed aboard. Knowing full well that an explosion might cost him his life, Captain Webel poured the gasoline through the ventilator over the hot engine; whereupon, in a burst of flame, he was blown approximately thirty feet through the air by the resultant blast. The lull provided by the spectacular destruction of the lead tank enabled the task force to reorganize. Disregarding shock, two broken ribs, and second-degree burns on his face and hands and, notwithstanding concentrated enemy fire that continuously swept the narrow streets, Captain Webel refused medical attention as he established cohesive defensive positions. Then, with a loaded bazooka, he proceeded to a point on the edge of the city where, from a range of approximately twenty-five yards, he fired alternately into two assaulting enemy tanks until they were destroyed. As enemy troops started withdrawing, Captain Webel dropped the bazooka and, from an exposed position on the road, opened fire with his submachine-gun. Then he again refused medical attention until all other wounded persons were treated.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)

*WENTZEL, DAVE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dave W. Wentzel (RA27550994), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant with an Company F, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wentzel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on the night of 21 November 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wentzel was occupying an outpost position with his men when it was suddenly subjected to a fierce attack by approximately two battalions of the enemy. Without hesitation, he left his own position and made an immediate circuit of the entire defense perimeter, passing through intense enemy artillery, mortar, automatic-weapons, and small-arms fire to instruct his men. When the first wave of the assaulting enemy neared the outpost, Sergeant Wentzel moved along the top of the defensive positions, completely exposed to the hostile fire. His calmness under fire and his shouted words of encouragement gave the friendly troops the necessary courage to repel the assault. With the first attack repulsed, Sergeant Wentzel reorganized his men in anticipation for the next hostile assault and, although he was painfully wounded, he moved to other sections of the perimeter to coordinate the defense. Despite the fact that he was seriously weakened by his wound, Sergeant Wentzel, realizing that all available firepower was needed, refused to be evacuated and insisted on maintaining his own position. When the final enemy attack was launched, Sergeant Wentzel fearlessly leaped from his emplacement and killed six of the enemy with his carbine who were attempting to blast through the friendly barbed-wire entanglements with explosives. As he made his way back to his position, a hostile grenade exploded at his feet and killed him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 183 (April 6, 1952)
Home Town: Mower, Minnesota

WEST, HERMAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herman L. West, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain West distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 7 September 1950. When his unit, almost surrounded by the enemy, received orders to withdraw to new positions under cover of darkness, Captain West improvised litters for his wounded and began the descent from the hill they occupied. Half way down heavy enemy artillery fire cut off the Company from other withdrawing units. During this barrage, Captain West received a painful back injury, but proceeded to re-form his Company and led it down another escape route. By making a personal reconnaissance despite his severe injury, he moved his company through three miles of enemy territory until dawn, when a brisk fight developed with the enemy on all sides. The company succeeded in driving off the enemy after killing a regimental commander and his staff and capturing valuable documents which disclosed friendly artillery positions known to the enemy. Proceeding toward a friendly unit, the company came under artillery and mortar fire which cut off the last platoon, which was carrying the wounded. Captain West, completely disregarding his own safety and the intense pain from his back injury, dashed 500 yards through the heavy fire to rally and move up the last platoon. When radio contact was made and the heavy shelling was found to be from friendly units, he dashed through the barrage a second time to radio and have the fire lifted. Only by his extremely courageous leadership and selfless disregard of his own safety and despite his injured condition, was Captain West’s company, with its wounded, enabled to return to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950), as amended by paragraph 3, Section III, of General Orders No. 121, HQ Eighth US Army Korea (1951)

*WHITE, EDWARD ANSEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Ansel White (0-57152), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant White distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant White was in command of an outpost comprising eleven men when an enemy force of two platoons launched a pre-dawn attack. In the face of overwhelming odds, Lieutenant White calmly withheld the order to fire until the enemy approached within twenty-five yards, then his outpost delivered such devastating fire from small arms and grenades that thirty of the enemy were killed. During this action the outpost expended nearly all of its ammunition and Lieutenant White, although the road was swept for machine-gun fire, drove a jeep to the rear for more ammunition. Obtaining the ammunition, he started back through the concentrated enemy fire. During the return trip First Lieutenant White was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (September 7, 1950)
Home Town: Monterey, California

*WILBUR, WILLIAM HALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Hale Wilbur (0-59308), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Wilbur distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tabu-dong, Korea, on 3 September 1950. From the 28th of August 1950, when he joined the Eighth Cavalry Regiment, Lieutenant Wilbur continually volunteered for extra hazardous duties, leading several combat and reconnaissance patrols deep into enemy territory and securing important information as to enemy gun emplacements and troop dispositions. On the morning of 4 September 1950, Company I was given the mission of halting the enemy’s advance by cutting the road north of Tabu-dong, even though the village and terrain to their rear was held by the enemy. Realizing the necessity of clearing the enemy from the village, Lieutenant Wilbur volunteered to lead a thirty-man patrol into it. Although continually harassed by enemy small arms fire, he succeeded in clearing a sector. Then, despite the heavy enemy small arms and machine-gun fire, he aggressively led his patrol to the far side of the town where they successfully recovered and evacuated a seriously wounded man. While clearing out the remainder of the village, Lieutenant Wilbur skillfully directed his patrol in repelling an enemy attack, killing six. When the enemy, approximately seventy-five in number, launched a second attack and nearly overwhelmed his troops, he called for artillery fire upon his own position and broke up the hostile force, allowing his patrol to withdraw to his company’s position. His courage, initiative, and superior leadership were largely responsible for Company I successfully withstanding successive attacks of an enemy in vastly numerical strength over a period of three days. He constantly exposed himself to intense enemy fire, and on 5 September 1950, was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 14 (January 8, 1951)
Home Town: Lake, Illinois

WILSON, NORMAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norman E. Wilson (US56111054), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Wilson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tokchol-li, Korea, on 6 September 1951. On that date, the friendly forces were occupying a patrol base that had been surrounded and was undergoing an attack by elements of three enemy regiments. Although wounded in the initial assault, Private Wilson refused medical aid and steadfastly remained at his post, delivering a devastating volume of machine-gun fire into the charging enemy’s ranks. During lulls in the attack, he fearlessly exposed himself to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire to obtain re-supplies of ammunition for his weapon. Although wounded twice more by small-arms fire, Private Wilson still refused to be evacuated, and when his platoon executed a limited withdrawal, he voluntarily remained in his position to cover his comrades as they fell back. At this time he noticed three friendly riflemen in an isolated position. Immediately, he attracted the attention of the hostile force and by causing the enemy fire to be concentrated on him, enabled the three men to crawl to safety. In this action, Private Wilson succeeded in neutralizing two hostile automatic-weapons and killing approximately twenty-five enemy Soldiers.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 772 (October 16, 1951)
Home Town: Canyon, Idaho

WISEMORE, ROYAL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Royal A. Wisemore, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Wisemore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kasan, Korea, on 28 November 1950. On that date, Company I’s defensive positions were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by intense artillery and mortar fire. Working tirelessly, Sergeant Wisemore moved among the friendly troops, giving medical aid to the many wounded. As the battle raged, enemy troops infiltrated the friendly defenses and Sergeant Wisemore, in order to evacuate the seriously wounded, was forced to move across terrain occupied by the enemy. Although it meant exposing himself to the concentrated fire of the hostile force, Sergeant Wisemore evacuated two men in this manner. After moving these men to positions of safety, he returned to Company I’s defense line and found a man with a badly wounded foot. Upon attempting to carry him to the rear, Sergeant Wisemore found that the route was cut off by the enemy. He then carried the wounded man toward a road which he had observed earlier. Upon reaching the road, he found two men, who were cut off from the friendly forces which had withdrawn to a new defense line, engaged in a fierce firefight with the enemy. Joining them in a position which was subjected to the concentrated fire of the enemy, Sergeant Wisemore used his own body to shield the wounded man from the many enemy grenades being hurled at them. As Sergeant Wisemore and his comrades distracted the enemy, the wounded man attempted to drag himself to safety. After remaining in their position for twenty minutes, the men, believing that the wounded man had reached the friendly lines, withdrew through the surrounding enemy to the new defense perimeter. As they reached a position of comparative safety, Sergeant Wisemore heard the wounded man, who had not been able to reach the friendly lines, call for help. Unhesitatingly, he rushed back across the fire-swept terrain and carried him to cover.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 875 (November 11, 1951)

*WOO, THEODORE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Theodore R. Woo (0-2202513), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Woo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Mago-ri, Korea, on 3 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Woo led his platoon to the company’s objective under intense mortar and small-arms fire. In the initial assault, he outdistanced his leading elements and knocked out an enemy bunker. Although wounded in the arm, he left the hill, reorganized the platoon, and again led them to the objective. Before he could organize to hold the captured hill, a powerful enemy counterattack struck the position. Lieutenant Woo was again wounded, the platoon’s ammunition was exhausted, and its withdrawal become necessary. While he was courageously directing the withdrawal and the evacuation of the wounded, he was killed by an enemy mortar shell.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 89 (October 3, 1952)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

WOODSIDE, WILLIAM W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William W. Woodside, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Woodside distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, n the night of 26 – 27 September 1950.0. On 26 September 1950, Lieutenant Woodside moved northward in a motor column to link with other United Nations elements in Korea. Shortly after midnight as the column entered the town of Hambung-ni, ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines, it was suddenly ambushed by ten enemy T-34 tanks with infantry support. In the pitch darkness and under an intense hail of machine-gun and tank cannon fire, Lieutenant Woodside quickly organized a group of four enlisted men, armed with grenades, and led them against a tank. Reaching the tank, he hurled grenades into the open hatch until the crew was silenced, enabling final destruction by a comrade who poured gasoline into the hot engine, causing the tank to explode. Moving quickly to the front of the column, reorganizing the confused troops as he went, he led them into the thick of the fighting. He then assisted in destroying a tank that had smashed through the head of the column and then, standing in an exposed position approximately twenty yards form enemy foot Soldiers, he fired his carbine with such fearless tenacity that they dispersed wildly. At daybreak, after the enemy tanks had withdrawn, a hostile machine-gun crew opened intense fire on the column. Unhesitatingly, again with complete disregard for his life, Lieutenant Woodside led two men in a spectacular charge, overrunning the position and killing the crew. First Lieutenant Woodside, through his tenacious intrepidity, sustained courage, and inspiring gallantry contributed materially to the successful counterattack of the enemy ambush and continuation of the column’s movement to accomplish its objective.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)

WURST, HOWARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard C. Wurst, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wurst distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chung-myon, Korea, on 14 July 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wurst was placed in charge of an ambush patrol in an outpost position with the mission of checking any enemy attempts to attack the battalion’s patrol base. In the early morning hours a squad of hostile troops launched a surprise assault and succeeded in overrunning the patrol’s machine-gun emplacement. Observing this, Sergeant Wurst charged the enemy-held position in a fearless, single-handed assault, firing his carbine and hurling grenades. This sudden and aggressive action caused the enemy troops to withdraw from the emplacement and Sergeant Wurst immediately called to his men to move forward and reoccupy the position. While the friendly forces were still in the process of setting up their defenses, they were again attacked, this time from the front and both flanks, by an estimated two companies of the enemy. Quickly, Sergeant Wurst organized his men, put the machine-gun in operating condition, and deployed his forces for an effective defense. Despite the heavy volume of enemy fire concentrated on him, Sergeant Wurst repeatedly moved form position to position across the exposed terrain, calming and encouraging his men and directing their fire. He then called for friendly mortar and artillery support by radio and directed fire against the enemy with such devastating precision that the attack was broken and the hostile troops were forced to withdraw with many casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 738 (October 1, 1951)

*Awarded Posthumously

Distinguished Service Cross

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces). It is awarded for extraordinary heroism:

While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States;
While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy and Marine Corps, and Coast Guard when operating under the authority of the Department of the Navy) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force).

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